Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Papers
Naruto Furuya Last modified date:2019.10.08

Professor / Agricultural Bioresource Sciences / Department of Bioresource Sciences / Faculty of Agriculture


Papers
1. Nguyen Thanh Ha, Tran Quang Minh, Pham Xuan Hoi, Nguyen Thi Thanh Thuy, Naruto Furuya, Hoang Hoa Long, Biological control of potato tuber soft rot usingN-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-degradingendophytic bacteria., Current Science, 115, 10, 1921-1927, 2018.08.
2. Kikuhara K, Iiyama, Mastumoto, Furuya N, First report of occurrence of resistance to DMI fungicides in Gymnosporangium asiaticum, the causal agent of Japanese pear rust, in Japan., JGPP, 85, 1, 49-56, 2019.01.
3. Htet Wai Wai Kyaw, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Matsumoto Masaru, Seint San Aye, Kazuhiro Iiyama, Daisuke Kurose, Mitsuo Horita, Naruto Furuya, Molecular characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum strains causing bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Myanmar by rep-PCR analysis, Journal of General Plant Pahology, 85, 1, 33-38, 2019.01.
4. Norimitsu Hamaoka, Hideshi Yasui, Yoshiyuki Yamagata, Yoko Inoue, Naruto Furuya, Takuya Araki, Ueno Osamu, Atsushi Yoshimura, A hairy-leaf gene, BLANKET LEAF, of wild Oryza nivara increases photosynthetic water use efficiency in rice, Rice, 10.1186/s12284-017-0158-1, 10, 1, 2017.12, Background: High water use efficiency is essential to water-saving cropping. Morphological traits that affect photosynthetic water use efficiency are not well known. We examined whether leaf hairiness improves photosynthetic water use efficiency in rice. Results: A chromosome segment introgression line (IL-hairy) of wild Oryza nivara (Acc. IRGC105715) with the genetic background of Oryza sativa cultivar ‘IR24’ had high leaf pubescence (hair). The leaf hairs developed along small vascular bundles. Linkage analysis in BC5F2 and F3 populations showed that the trait was governed by a single gene, designated BLANKET LEAF (BKL), on chromosome 6. IL-hairy plants had a warmer leaf surface in sunlight, probably due to increased boundary layer resistance. They had a lower transpiration rate under moderate and high light intensities, resulting in higher photosynthetic water use efficiency. Conclusion: Introgression of BKL on chromosome 6 from O. nivara improved photosynthetic water use efficiency in the genetic background of IR24..
5. Daisuke Kurose, Naruto Furuya, Tetsuya Saeki, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Seiya Tsushima, Marion K. Seier, Erratum to
Species-Specific Detection of Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati as a Biological Control Agent for Fallopia japonica by PCR Assay (Molecular Biotechnology, (2016), 58, 10, (626-633), 10.1007/s12033-016-9962-x), Molecular Biotechnology, 10.1007/s12033-017-0023-x, 59, 9-10, 2017.10, The article “Species-Specific Detection of Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati as a Biological Control Agent for Fallopia japonica by PCR Assay”, written by Daisuke Kurose, Naruto Furuya, Tetsuya Saeki, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Seiya Tsushima, and Marion K. Seier, was originally published Online First without open access. After publication in volume 58, issue 10, pages 626-633, the author decided to opt for Open Choice and to make the article an open access publication. Therefore, the copyright of the article has been changed to.
6. Htet Wai Wai Kyaw, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Matsumoto Masaru, Kazuhiro Iiyama, Seint San Aye, Myo Zaw, Daisuke Kurose, Mitsuo Horita, Naruto Furuya, Genetic diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum strains causing bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Myanmar, Journal of General Plant Pathology, 10.1007/s10327-017-0720-0, 83, 4, 216-225, 2017.07, In 2013 and 2014, an extensive survey of bacterial wilt in Myanmar was performed, and 70 strains of Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) were collected from wilting plants of tomato, potato, chili and eggplant. Myanmar Rs strains were characterized by traditional and molecular methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using Rs-specific primer set amplified one specific band (281-bp) from template DNA of all strains. Pathogenicity tests on the four solanaceous plants differentiated the strains into six pathogenic groups. Biovar determination tests showed that biovar 3 strains predominated (63%) among all Rs strains. Biovar 4 strains (7%) were obtained from both tomato and chili strains, whereas biovar 2 (30%) strains were isolated only from potato. Multiplex-PCR analysis indicated that tomato, eggplant and chili strains belonged to phylotype I, whereas potato strains comprised phylotype I and phylotype II. Strains in phylotype I, which was suggested to have originated from Asia, were the most prevalent in all surveyed areas. Phylogenetic analysis based on the endoglucanase (egl) gene sequences revealed that Myanmar strains partitioned into two major clusters that corresponded to phylotype I and II. Strains in phylotype I were further divided into seven subclusters, each corresponding to a distinct sequevar (15, 17, 46, 47, 48, unknown 1 or unknown 2). All strains in phylotype II belonged to sequevar 1. This is the first comprehensive report of the presence of diverse Rs strains in Myanmar..
7. Shunichiro Takano, Midori Tuda, Keiji Takasu, Naruto Furuya, Yuya Imamura, Sangwan Kim, Kosuke Tashiro, Kazuhiro Iiyama, Matias Tavares, Acacio Cardoso Amaral, Unique clade of alphaproteobacterial endosymbionts induces complete cytoplasmic incompatibility in the coconut beetle, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 10.1073/pnas.1618094114, 114, 23, 6110-6115, 2017.06, Maternally inherited bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods manipulate host reproduction to increase the fitness of infected females. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, in which uninfected females produce few or no offspring when they mate with infected males. To date, two bacterial endosymbionts, Wolbachia and Cardinium, have been reported as CI inducers. Only Wolbachia induces complete CI, which causes 100% offspring mortality in incompatible crosses. Here we report a third CI inducer that belongs to a unique clade of Alphaproteobacteria detected within the coconut beetle, Brontispa longissima. This beetle comprises two cryptic species, the Asian clade and the Pacific clade, which show incompatibility in hybrid crosses. Different bacterial endosymbionts, a unique clade of Alphaproteobacteria in the Pacific clade and Wolbachia in the Asian clade, induced bidirectional CI between hosts. The former induced complete CI (100% mortality), whereas the latter induced partial CI (70% mortality). Illumina MiSeq sequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns showed that the predominant bacterium detected in the Pacific clade of B. longissima was this unique clade of Alphaproteobacteria alone, indicating that this endosymbiont was responsible for the complete CI. Sex distortion did not occur in any of the tested crosses. The 1,160 bp of 16S rRNA gene sequence obtained for this endosymbiont had only 89.3% identity with that of Wolbachia, indicating that it can be recognized as a distinct species. We discuss the potential use of this bacterium as a biological control agent..
8. Fukuda Katsuto, Aya Yanagawa, Gen Sakurai, Satoshi Kamitani, Furuya, N., Sexual difference in antennal sensilla abundance, density and size in Callosobruchus rhodesianus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae), Appl Entomol Zool, 10.1007/s13355-016-0441-4, 51, 641-651, 2016.12.
9. Katsuto Fukuda, Aya Yanagawa, Midori Tuda, Gen Sakurai, Satoshi Kamitani, Naruto Furuya, Sexual difference in antennal sensilla abundance, density and size in Callosobruchus rhodesianus (Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae), Applied Entomology and Zoology, 10.1007/s13355-016-0441-4, 51, 4, 641-651, 2016.11, Sexual difference in antennal sensilla size and per area density has rarely been studied in insects. The bruchine seed beetle Callosobruchus rhodesianus (Pic) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) is distributed over Central and Southern Africa and is a pest of stored legume seeds, especially cowpeas Vigna unguiculata. Here, we study the type, abundance, morphology and per area density of antennal sensilla on each antennal segment and their sexual differences in C. rhodesianus. The antennae of normal individuals consist of the scape, pedicel and nine flagellomeres as in other congeneric species. Sizes of most antennomeres are larger in males than in females. We observed the following eight different types of antennal sensilla: sensilla trichodea types 1 and 2 (ST1, ST2), sensillacavitae (SCa), sensilla chaetica (SC), sensilla basiconica types 1, 2 and 3 (SB1, SB2, SB3) and Böhm bristles (BB). The SCa is found on all antennomeres unlike in congeners (C. chinensis and C. maculatus). The ST1, the most numerous and longest antennal sensilla type, is denser and thinner in females than in males but more abundant in males than in females. Since the ST1 is considered to serve as a chemoreceptor, the sexual difference in the ST1 may benefit males in searching for mates..
10. Kurose, D., Furuya, N., Saeki, T., Kenichi Tsuchiya, Tsushima、S., Seier, MK., Species-Specific Detection of Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati as a Biological Control Agent for Fallopia japonica by PCR Assay, Mol Biotechnol, 10.1007/s12033-016-9962-x, 58, 626-633, 2016.10.
11. Daisuke Kurose, Naruto Furuya, Tetsuya Saeki, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Seiya Tsushima, Marion K. Seier, Species-Specific Detection of Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati as a Biological Control Agent for Fallopia japonica by PCR Assay, Molecular Biotechnology, 10.1007/s12033-016-9962-x, 58, 10, 626-633, 2016.10, The ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerellapolygoni-cuspidati has been undergoing evaluation as a potential classical biological control agent for the invasive weed Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed), which has become troublesome in Europe and North America. In advance of the potential release of a biocontrol agent into a new environment, it is crucial to develop an effective monitoring system to enable the evaluation of agent establishment and dispersal within the target host population, as well as any potential attacks on non-target species. Therefore, a primer pair was designed for direct, rapid, and specific detection of the Japanese knotweed pathogen M. polygoni-cuspidati based on the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions including the 5.8S rDNA. A PCR product of approximately 298 bp was obtained only when the DNA extracted from mycelial fragments of M. polygoni-cuspidati was used. The lower limit of detection of the PCR method was 100 fg of genomic DNA. Using the specific primer pair, M. polygoni-cuspidati could be detected from both naturally and artificially infected Japanese knotweed plants. No amplification was observed for other Mycosphaerella spp. or fungal endophytes isolated from F. japonica. The designed primer pair is thus effective for the specific detection of M. polygoni-cuspidati in planta..
12. Hyo Jin Lim, Eun Young Seo, Hyun Seung Kim, Jung Kyu Kim, Chan Hwan Park, Jun Su Gong, Ik Hyun Kim, Sang Huk Han, James P. Kilcrease, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, John Hammond, Hyoun Sub Lim, 2015 nationwide survey revealed Barley stripe mosaic virus in Korean barley fields, Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 61, 1, 71-77, 2016.02, A seed-transmitted virus has consistently caused significant economic damage to barley crops in Korea in recent years, and may be increasing because many farmers save seed for replanting. Because some barley seed is imported, there is the potential for introduction of new seed-transmitted viruses, causing diseases which may spread. Barley cultivation in South Korea is expanding nationwide due to the increasing popularity of health foods, so both production and quality of barley grain is important. Although Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) has been reported previously as a small percentage of all barley viruses present in Korea, increases in imports of barley seed may lead to increased occurrence of this seed-transmitted virus. We therefore investigated the virus status of beirley crops around Iksan and Wanju. On several newly cultivated barley farms, we observed areas showing symptoms typical of BSMV, and confirmed BSMV infection in 24% of the samples examined. In order to understand the occurrence and seed transmission of Korean BSMV isolates, we examined sequence variation within the Triple Gene Block proteins, and subcellular localization of two of these proteins. The newly identified Korean BSMV isolates show low sequence variability and high sequence homology to previously reported US isolates. With these results, we expect to confirm distribution of barley viruses and possible emerging viruses, which mu serve as base line data to document virus prevention and control measures..
13. Daisuke Kurose, Tomoo Misawa, Takahito Suzui, Kazunori Ichikawa, Gan Kisaki, Long H Hoang, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Seiya Tsushima, Toyozo Sato, Taxonomic re-examination of several Japanese Stemphylium strains based on morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses, Jouarnal of General Plant Pathology, 81, 5, 358-367, 2015.09.
14. Daisuke Kurose, Tomoo Misawa, Takahito Suzui, Kazunori Ichikawa, Gan Kisaki, Long H. Hoang, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Seiya Tsushima, Toyozo Sato, Taxonomic re-examination of several Japanese Stemphylium strains based on morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses, Journal of General Plant Pathology, 10.1007/s10327-015-0607-x, 81, 5, 358-367, 2015.09, Most of the many Stemphylium species on record as plant pathogens in Japan have been identified by morphology. Using molecular phylogenetic analysis of four loci (rDNA-ITS, EF-1α, GPD, and vmaA-vpsA) combined, we re-examined the taxonomy of 31 Stemphylium strains that had been identified morphologically before or after their deposit in the NIAS Genebank, Japan. In the present study, these Japanese strains were separated into three groups (Groups A, C, and E). Sixteen Japanese strains formed a new subgroup (designated Subgroup C2) that contained no type or ex-type strains of existing species. Four of the strains had been identified correctly, whereas the other 27 strains appear to have been misidentified based on our phylogenetic analysis. We examined the conidial morphology of four representative misidentified strains selected from each clade. While the morphological characteristics of a strain isolated from Welsh onion resembles those of the S. vesicarium type, this strain belongs to Subgroup C2 rather than Subgroup C1 and, therefore, could not be identified at the species level. Conversely, three pathogenic strains isolated from aster, asparagus, and Chinese chive were re-identified based on our combined morphological and phylogenetic data. We propose the scientific names of the aster leaf spot pathogen as S. lycopersici, and the asparagus Stemphylium leaf spot and Chinese chive brown leaf blight pathogens as S. herbarum..
15. Daisuke Kurose, Naruto Furuya, Marion K. Seier, Djamila H. Djeddour, Harry C. Evans, Yuko Matsushita, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Seiya Tsushima, Factors affecting the efficacy of the leaf-spot fungus Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati (Ascomycota)
A potential classical biological control agent of the invasive alien weed Fallopia japonica (Polygonaceae) in the UK, Biological Control, 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2015.03.002, 85, 1-11, 2015.06, Fallopia japonica, commonly known as Japanese knotweed, is an increasingly serious invasive alien weed in the UK and large parts of mainland Europe, as well as in North America. There is an urgent need to include classical biological control (CBC) into any integrated pest management strategy. The leaf-spot pathogen Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati, a coevolved natural enemy of F. japonica present throughout its native Japanese range, is considered to have high potential as a CBC agent. In this study, the disease development of M. polygoni-cuspidati in the field and the optimum infection parameters under controlled conditions were investigated to elucidate the pathogen's potential biocontrol efficacy against Japanese knotweed. Field observation in Japan showed that M. polygoni-cuspidati caused severe damage to its host plant. When sentinel knotweed plants from the UK were placed amongst naturally-infected field populations of F. japonica, disease incidence and severity were highest in July when monthly precipitation was also highest. In greenhouse inoculation tests, F. japonica was shown to be most susceptible at the young leaf stage (7-12. days after opening). Disease severity was highest after an initial dew period of 42-48. h, and severe defoliation followed inoculation at a temperature range of 15-25. °C. The optimum post-inoculation temperature after dew treatment for disease severity was 20-25. °C. In field inoculation tests, high disease incidence and severity indicate that the pathogen has the potential to control the plant effectively in the field. Humidity and temperature were shown to be the main factors influencing disease expression and lesion development of M. polygoni-cuspidati in a field situation. These results provide valuable information for any future use of M. polygoni-cuspidati as a CBC agent for management of Japanese knotweed in the UK..
16. Koji Nomiyama, Takahide Sasaya, Hiroyuki Sekiguchi, Keisuke Tomioka, Hideki Osaki, Minoru Takeshita, Toshiaki Takehara, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, DAS-ELISA quantification of resting spores of Olpidium vbirulentus in roots and correlation between resting spore density in soil and severity of lettuce big-vein disease, Journal of General Plant Pathology, 81, 3, 243-248, 2015.05.
17. Koji Nomiyama, Takahide Sasaya, Hiroyuki Sekiguchi, Keisuke Tomioka, Hideki Osaki, Minoru Takeshita, Toshiaki Takehara, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, DAS-ELISA quantification of resting spores of Olpidium virulentus in roots and correlation between resting spore density in soil and severity of lettuce big-vein disease, Journal of General Plant Pathology, 10.1007/s10327-015-0586-y, 81, 3, 243-248, 2015.05, A method to quantify resting spores of Olpidium virulentus, fungal vector of Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus, which causes lettuce big-vein disease, in lettuce roots was developed using a DAS-ELISA with a polyclonal antibody against the resting spores and used to evaluate the relationship between the resting spore density in soil and disease severity. When lettuce seedlings were grown on soils containing a powder made from diseased roots with a known number of resting spores, symptoms developed from ca. 102 spores/g of soil or more. This simple method can be used in soil diagnosis and risk assessment of the disease..
18. Ha T. Nguyen, Ha T.T.Nguyen, Hoi X. Pham, Ham H. LE, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Long H. Hoang, Identification of agents causing brown rot of Cymbidium iridioidesin Sa Pa, Lao Cai province, Vietnam. , J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 60, 1, 1-6, 2015.02.
19. Phoowanarth Maneechoat, Minoru Takeshita, Misa Uenoyama, Maki Nakatsukasa, Atsuko Kuroda, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, A single amino acid at N-terminal region of the 2b protein of cucumber mosaic virus strain m1 has a pivotal role in virus attenuation., Virus Research , 197, 67-74, 197, 2015.02.
20. Ha T. Nguyen, Ha T T Nguyen, Hoi X. Pham, Ham H. Le, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Long H. Hoang, Identification of agents causing brown rot of Cymbidium iridioides in Sa Pa, Lao Cai Province, Vietnam, Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 60, 1, 1-6, 2015.02, Cymbidium orchid (Cymbidium iridioides) is widely cultivated in Northern mountainous provinces of Vietnam, especially in Sa Pa, Lao Cai province. However, severe outbreaks of brown rot disease in C. iridioides occurred in July, 2013 due to abnormal weather conditions that resulted in significant loss for growers. In order to identify exactly the causal agent of the disease, the infested samples were collected. Twenty-five bacterial isolates were selected and no fungus was present in the samples. Pectolytic activity of those bacterial isolates was determined on potato tuber slices and the virulence was assessed on cymbidium cut leaves in vitro. As results, three bacterial isolates [M3(1), M3(2) and M4(3)] induced different rot symptoms on potato tuber slices and cymbidium cut leaves. Based on their bacteriological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, these bacterial isolates M3(1), M4(3) and M3(2) were identified as Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, P. carotovorum and Pseudomonas sp., respectively. The results suggested that bacterial brown rot disease of C. iridioides in Sa Pa, Lao Cai province, might involve three causal bacterial species..
21. Kurose, D., Furuya Naruto, Marion K. Seier, Djamila H. Djeddour, Harry C. Evans, Yuko Matsushita, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Seiya Tsushima, Factors affecting the efficacy of the leaf-spot fungus Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati (Ascomycota):A potential classical biological control agent of the invasive alien weed Fallopia japonica (Polygonaceae) in the UK, Biological Control, 85, 1, 1-11, 2015.01.
22. Phoowanarth Maneechoat, Minoru Takeshita, Misa Uenoyama, Maki Nakatsukasa, Atsuko Kuroda, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, A single amino acid at N-terminal region of the 2b protein of cucumber mosaic virus strain m1 has a pivotal role in virus attenuation, Virus Research, 10.1016/j.virusres.2014.12.020, 197, 67-74, 2015.01, Host responses to infection by a mild strain of cucumber mosaic virus, termed CMV-m1, were re-examined in several plant species in comparison with those by a severe strain CMV-Y. Mild systemic symptoms were developed on the six plant species inoculated with CMV-m1. Virus titer in the Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with CMV-m1 was significantly lower than those infected with CMV-Y, although infection by CMV-m1 interfered with further infection by CMV-Y in the plants. Subsequently, the attenuated virulence of CMV-m1 was analyzed by reassortment and recombination analyses between CMV-m1 and CMV-Y RNAs. The results suggested that the 2b protein of CMV-m1 (m1-2b) is involved in the formation of mild symptoms in N. benthamiana. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that Thr18 of m1-2b is responsible for formation of mild symptoms. Local RNA silencing suppressor activity of m1-2b was a little lower than that of severe strain CMV-Y. We discuss the relationship between attenuation of CMV-m1 and the features of m1-2b..
23. Mitsuo Horita, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Yasuhiro Suga, Kazutaka Yano, Takamitsu Waki, Daisuke Kurose, Naruto Furuya, Current classification of Ralstonia solanacearum and genetic diversity of the strains in Japan, Journal of General Plant Pathology, 10.1007/s10327-014-0537-z, 80, 6, 455-465, 2014.11, Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal organism of bacterial wilt of more than 200 species representing 50 families of plants in tropical, subtropical, and warm temperate regions in the world. Traditionally classified into five races based on differences in host range, R. solanacearum has also been grouped into six biovars on the basis of biochemical properties. With recent developments in molecular biology, various DNA-based analyses have been introduced and used to confirm that this binary system does not completely represent the diversity within R. solanacearum strains. Therefore, a new hierarchical classification scheme has been suggested, which defines R. solanacearum as a species complex and reorganized the concept of the species as a monophyletic cluster according to a phylogenetic analysis based on genomic sequence data. Here we discuss the current bacterial wilt situation and genetic relationships based on the recent classification system of Japanese R. solanacearum strains as well as worldwide strains. We also review the genetic, biochemical, and pathological characteristics of R. solanacearum strains, in particular, those affecting potato and Zingiberaceae plants as distinctly important pathogens in relation to continuously problematic and recent emergent diseases in Japan..
24. Kurose, D., Hoang, L.H, Furuya Naruto, Minoru Takeshita, Sato, T, Tsushima, S, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Pathogenicity of Stemphylium lycopersici isolated from rotted tobacco seeds on seedlings and leaves., J. Gen. Plant Pathol, 80, 147-152, 2014.03.
25. Minoru Takeshita, Okuda, M, Okuda, S, Hyodo, A, Hamano, K, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Induction of Antiviral Responses by Acibenzolar-S-Methyl Against Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus in Melon, Phytopathology, 103, 960-965, 2013.05.
26. Noriko Takano-Kai,, Hui Jiang, Susan McCouch, Itsuro Takamure, Naruto Furuya, Kazuyuki Doi, Atsushi Yoshimura, Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice.

, Breeding Science , 10.1270/jsbbs.63.77, 63, 1, 77-85, 2013.03.
27. Nguyen N.M.T., L.H.Hoang, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Nguyen T.T.T, Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with drought tolerance in Vietnamese local rice
(Oryza sativa L.) , J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 58, 1, 1-6, 2013.02.
28. Y. Suga, M. Horita, M Umekita, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Pathogenic characters of Japanese potato strains of Ralstonia solanacearum
, J Gen Plant Pathol, 10.107/s10327-013-0429-7, 79, 110-114, 2013.01.
29. Y.Y. Myinta, Nakahira Kengo, Takagi Masami, Furuya Naruto, R.H. Shaw, Using life-history parameters and a degree-day model to predict climate suitability in England for the Japanese knotweed psyllid Aphalara itadori Shinji (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), Biological Control, 63, 2, 129-134, 2012.07.
30. D. Kurose, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, S. Tsushima, H. C. Evans, Endophytic fungi associated with Fallopia japonica (Polygonaceae) in Japan and their interactions with Puccinia polygoni-amphibii var. tovariae, a candidate for classical biological control., Fungal Biology, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2012.04.011, 116, 785-791, 2012.07.
31. Furuya Naruto, Satoru Taura, T. Goto, Bui Trong Thuy, Phan Huu Ton, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Yoshimura Atsushi, Diversity in virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae from northern Vietnam, JARQ , 46, 329-338, 2012.02.
32. Payapanon, A., Suthirawut, S., Shompoosang, S., Tsuchiya, K., Furuya, N., Roongraweet, P., Kulpiyawat, T. and Somrith, A. , Increase in yeild of the straw mushuroom (Vovariella volvacea)by supplement with Paenibacillus and Bacillus to the compost, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ. , 56, 2, 249-254, 2011.10.
33. Minoru Takeshita, Naoko Nagai, Mitsuru Okuda, Shohei Matsuura, Shiori Okuda, Furuya Naruto, Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Molecular and biological characterization of Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus isolates from distinct regions in Japan, 2011.05.
34. Niwa, R., Yoshida, S., Furuya, N., Tsuchiya, K. and Tsushima, S., Method for simple and rapid enumeration of total epiphytic bacteria in the washing solution of rice plant. , Can. J. Microbiol, 57, 62-67, 2011.01.
35. Takahiro Goto, Tadayuki Matsumoto, Naruto Furuya,, Kenichi Tsuchiya and Atsushi Yoshimura, Mapping of bacterial blight resistance gene Xa11 on Rice chromosome 3, Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly, 43, 3, 221-225, 2009.08.
36. Kurose, D., Evans, H. C., Djeddour, D. H., Cannon, P. F., Furuya, N. and Tsuchiya, K., Systematic of Mycosphaerella species associated with the invasive weedFallopia japonica including the potential biological control agent M. polygoni-causpidati. , Mycoscience, 50, 179-189, 2009.07.
37. Minoru Takeshita, Yuka Matsuo, Masashi Suzuki, Naruto Furuya, Kenichi Tsuchiya, Yoichi Takanami, Impact of a defective RNA 3 from cucumber mosaic virus on helper virus infection , Virology, 389, 1-2, 59-65, 2009.06.
38. Naruto FURUYA, Takaya ITO and Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Occurrence of bacterial brown stripe of creeping bentgrass on golf course green in Kyushu, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 54,13-17, 2009.02.
39. Shinyou JYUFUKU, Naruto FURUYA, Takahiro GOTO, Kenichi TSUCHIYA and Atsushi YOSHIMURA , Pathogenic and genetic diversity in Asian strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ, 54,19-23, 2009.02.
40. Nobuaki Matsuyama, Makiko Daikohara, Keiko Yoshimura, Kayo Manabe, Md.Abu Ashraf Khan, Maria Salete de Melo, Hiromitsu Negishi, Kazuo Suyama, Kenichi Tsuchiya and Naruto Furuya, Presumptive differentiation of phytopathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria by improved rapid -extraction TLC method, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ, 54,1-11, 2009.02.
41. Daisuke KUROSE, Naruto FURUYA, Masaru Matsumoto, Djamila H. DJEDDOUR, Harry C. EVANS and Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Identification of an Aecidial Rust on Fallopia japonica , J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 54,53-57, 2009.02.
42. Daisuke KUROSE, Naruto FURUYA, Masaru Matsumoto, Djamila H. DJEDDOUR, Harry C. EVANS and Kenichi TSUCHIYA, Evaluation of a Puccinia Rust as a Potential Biological Control Agent of Fallopia japonica., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 54,59-64, 2009.02.
43. Takeshita, M., Matsuo, Y., Yoshikawa, T., Suzuki, M., Furuya, N., Tsuchiya, K. and Takanami, Y. , Characterization of a defective RNA derived from RNA 3 of the Y strain of cucumber mosaic virus, Archives of Virology , 153: 579-583, 2008.11.
44. Aye, S.S., Matsumoto, M., Kaku, H., Goto, T., Furuya, N., Yoshimura,A., Evaluation of resistance in rice plants to Myanmar isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 2007.02.
45. Y.Maeda, H. Shinohara, A. Kiba, K. Ohnish, N. Furuya, Y. Kawamura, T. Ezaki, P. A. R.Vandamme, S. Tsushima and Y. Hikichi , Phylogenetic study and multiplex PCR based detection of Burkholderia plantarii, Burkholderia glumae and Burkholderia gladioli using gyrB and rpoD sequences., International Jounal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology , 56: 1031-1038, 2006.10.
46. Kurose, D., Renals, T., Shaw, R., Furuya, N., Takagi, M., Evans, H., Fallopia japonica, an increasingly intractable weed problem in the UK: Can fungi help cut through this Gordian knot?, Mycologist, 126-129, 2006.07.
47. Were, H. K., Takeshita, M., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Molecular characterization of a new begomovirus infecting tobacco in Kagoshima, Japan: an evidence for interspecific recombination., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 50, 1, 83-91, 50: 83-91, 2005.01.
48. H. Ura, N. Furuya,K. Iiyama, K. Tsuchiya, N. Matsuyama, Burkholderia gladioli associated with symptoms of bacterial grain rot and leaf-sheath browning of rice plants, J. Gen. Plant Pathol, vol.72, No.2, 2005.01.
49. S. Chisada, Y. Horibata, Y. Hama, M. Inagaki, N. Furuya, N. Okino, M. Ito, The glycosphingolipid receptor for Vibrio trachuri in the red sea bream intestine is a GM4 ganglioside which contains 2-hydroxy fatty acids., BBRC, 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.05.110, 333, 2, 367-373, 367-373, 2005.01.
50. Takeshita, M., Shigemune, N., Kikuhara, K., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Spatial analysis for exclusive interactions between subgroups I and II of Cucumber mosaic virus in cowpea., Virology, 10.1016/j.virol.2004.06.046, 328, 1, 45-51, 328: 45-51, 2004.01.
51. Seo, S.T., Furuya, N., Iiyama, K., Takeshita, M., Takanami, Y., Tsuchiya, K. and Lim, C.K., Characterization of antibacterial substance produced by Erwinia carotovora subsp.carotovora Ecc 32, J. Gen. Plant Pathol., Vol70. No 50, 273-277, 2004.01.
52. Takeshita, M., Kikuhara, K., Kuwata, S., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Competioton between wild-type virus and a reasortant from subgroups I and II of CMV and activation of antiviral responses in cowpea., Arch Virol, 10.1007/s00705-004-0332-9, 149, 9, 1851-1857, 149: 1851-1857, 2004.01.
53. Marcela, A.T., Takeshita, M., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Characterization of two Cucumber mosaic virus isolated from Solanum mammosum and Nicotiana affinis, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 49, 2, 243-252, 49: 243-252, 2004.01.
54. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N., Lim, C. K., Takanami, Y. and Tsuchiya, K., Phenotipic and genetic characterization of Erwinia carotovora from mulberry trees (Morus spp.), Plant Pathol., 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2003.00816.x, 52, 2, 140-146, 52: 140-146, 2003.01.
55. Okuno, K., Hama, T., Takeshita, M., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., New potyvirus isolated from Cryptotaenia japonica., J. Gen. Plant Pathol, 69: 138-142, 2003.01.
56. Long, H. H., Furuya, N., Kurose, D., Takeshita, M. and Takanami, Y., Isolation of endophytic bacteria from Solanum sp. and their antibacterial activity against plant pathogenic bacteria, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 48, 1-2, 21-28, 48, 2003.01.
57. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N., Lim, C. K., Takanami, Y. and Tsuchiya, K., Phenotipic and genetic characterization of Erwinia carotovora from mulberry trees (Morus spp.), Plant Pathol., 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2003.00816.x, 52, 2, 140-146, 52: 140-146, 2003.01.
58. Kita, K., Sakaguchi, K., Furuya, N., Iida, T. and Ito, M., Possible involvement of Pseudomonas sphingolipid ceramide N-deacylase in red spot disease of eels., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ, 46, 2, 331-338, 46(2):331-338, 2002.01.
59. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N., Lim, C. K., Takanami, Y. and Tsuchiya, K., Phenotipic and genetic diversity of Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora strains from Asia, J. Phytopathology, 10.1046/j.1439-0434.2002.00722.x, 150, 3, 120-127, 150: 120-127, 2002.01.
60. Okuno, K., Kameya-Iwaki, M., Takeshita, M., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., A Cucumber mosaic virus isolated from Silene armeria., J. Gen. Plant Pathol., 68: 120-127, 2002.01.
61. Furuya, N., Ura, H., Iiyama, I., Matsumoto, M., Takeshita, M. and Takanami, Y., Specific oligonucleotide promers based on the sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region for the detection of Burkholderia gladioli by PCR., J. Gen. Plant Pathol., 68: 220-224, 2002.01.
62. Differentation of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and carotovora by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR..
63. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N., Takeshita, M. and Takanami, Y., Genotyping of Erwinia carotovora subsp. corotovora strains from Asia based on recA gene restriction fragment length polymorphisms., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 47, 1, 7-12, 47 (1): 7-12, 2002.01.
64. Furuya, N., Taura S., Thuy, B. T., Matsumoto, M., Aye, S. S. and Ton, P. H., Isolation and preservation of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae from Vietnam in 2001-2002, Bull. Inst. Trop. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 25: 43-50, 2002.01.
65. S. T. Seo, N. Furuya and Y. Takanami, Genetic diversity within Thai strains of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora based on ERIC and RFLP of a pel gene profiles., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ.,, 45(1):15-19, 2001.01.
66. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N., Lim, Chun-Keun, Tsuchiya, K. and Takanami, Y., Variation of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora isolated from Korea, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 45, 2, 431-436, 45(2): 431-436, 2001.01.
67. Seo, S. T., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Caharacterization Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora strains on the basis of cellular fatty acid composition, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 46(2), 2001.01.
68. A.A.Khan, N.Furuya, H.Ura and N.Matsuyama, Rapid identification of Erwinia chrysanthemi isolated from soft rotted eggplant and Phalaenopsis sp. by lipid and fatty acid profiling., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 44, 3-4, 257-263, 44 (3・4), 257-263, 2000.01.
69. Khan, A. A., Furuya, N., Matsumoto, M. and Matsuyama, N., Differentiation of phytopathogenic Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas pathovars and strains by PCR analysis for DNA topoisomerase genes., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 45, 1, 1-6, 45(1): 1-6, 2000.01.
70. Furuya, N., Masunaga, T., Khan, A., Iiyama., Matsumoto, M. and Matsuyama, N., Bacterial Wilt of Russell Prairie Gentian caused by Burkholderia caryophylli., Journal of General Plant pathology,, 66, 316-322, 2000.01.
71. Kyung-Hee Kim, S. Inoue, M. Kawanani, N. Furuya and N. Matsuyama, Antagonistic action of Bacillus sp. AB89 to Phloeospora maculans, causal agent of mulberry leaf spot, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 43, 3-4, 337-342, 43(3・4): 337-342, 1999.01.
72. M. Kawanami, N. Furuya, K. Iiyama, K. H. Kim, S. Morimoto and N. Matsuyama, Purification and characterization of anti-Pholeospora maculans substance produced by Bacillus subtilis AB89., Ann. Phytopath. Soc. Japan,, 65(6) 616-619., 1999.01.
73. A. A.Khan, N. Furuya, M. Matsumoto and N. Matsuyama, Identification of Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from wilted tobacco plant by fatty acid profiles and PCR-RFLP analysis., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 44, 1-2, 59-65, 44(1・2): 59-65, 1999.01.
74. Maria Salete de Melo, N. Furuya, M. Matsumoto and N. Matsuyama, Comparative studies on fatty acid composition of the whole-cell and outer membrane in Brazilian strains of Ralstonia solanacearum., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 44, 1-2, 17-23, 44(1・2) 17-23., 1999.01.
75. M. S. Melo, N. Furuya, K. Iiyama, A. A. Khan and N. Matsuyama., Geographical distribution of biovars of Ralstonia solanacearum in Brazil., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 44, 1-2, 9-15, 44(1・2) 9-15., 1999.01.
76. M.S. Melo, Takatsu,A., Uesugi, C.H., N.Furuya and N.Matsuyama., Population dynamics of Ralstonia solanacearum isolates in root system of various crops., Bulletin of the Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Kyushu University,, Vol.22, pp45-50., 1999.01.
77. M.S.Melo, N.Furuya and N. Matsuyama., Comparative memnrane characterization of Brazilian strains of Ralstonia solanacearum., Bulletin of the Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Kyushu University,, Vol. 22, pp39-44., 1999.01.
78. Morimoto, S., Tateishi, N., Matsuda, T., Tanaka, H., Taura, F., Furuya, N., Matsuyama, N. and Shoyama, Y., Novel hydrogen peroxide metabolism in suspension cells of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, The Jouranal of Biological Chemistry,, 10.1074/jbc.273.20.12606, 273, 20, 12606-12611, 273(20):12606-12611, 1998.05.
79. Iiyama, K., Furuya, N.,Ura, H. and Matsuyama, N., Role of phytotoxins in the pathogenesis of Burkholderia species, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 42, 3-4, 289-293, 42(3・4): 289-293, 1998.01.
80. Yamasaki, S., Furuya, N. and Matsuyama, N., Effect of specific ions in agar on antibiotic production by Burkholderia glumae, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 42, 3-4, 309-314, 43(3・4): 309-314, 1998.01.
81. Matsuyama, N., Ueda, Y., Iiyama, K., Furuya, N., Ura, H., Khan, A. A. and Matsumoto, M., Rapid extraction-HPLC as a tool for presumptive identification of Burkholderia gladioli, B.glumae and B. plantarii, causal agents of various rice diseases, J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 42, 3-4, 265-272, 42(3・4): 265-272, 1998.01.
82. Rapid identification of Ralstonia solanacearum by the direct colony TLC and simple TLC.
83. Khan, A. A., Furuya, N., Matsumoto,M. and Mtsuyama, N., Trail for rapid identification of pathogens from blasted pear blossom and rotted radish leaves by the direct colony TLC and whole cellular fatty acid analysis., J. Fac. Agr.,Kyushu Univ., 43(3・4): 327-335.
84. Furuya, N., Shimokusuzono, F., Nakamura, Y., Nishimura, K., Takeshita, M., Matsuyama. N., Manabe, K. and Takanami, Y., Crown Gall of tobacco caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens biovar I in tobacco fields., J. Gen. Plant Pathol., 70.
85. Were, H. K., Takeshita, M., Furuya, N. and Takanami, Y., Molecular characterization of a new begomovirus infecting honeysuckle in Kobe, Japan., J. Fac. Agr., Kyushu Univ., 50: 61-71.