Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Presentations
Michael William Hall Last modified date:2019.06.14

Associate Professor / Social System Design / Department of Design Strategy / Faculty of Design


Presentations
1. Michael Hall, ESL Lessons Utilizing Design Concepts to Facilitate Effective Presentation Skills for Japanese University Students, Clute Institute, 2017.07,
This ESL course for design students incorporates videos that introduce design concepts and processes in natural English. Even though the comments from last year’s course were mostly positive, it has been revised to meet the students’ request to increase the focus on presentation skills instead of the equal weight on listening and presentation skills supplied in the original plan. The course still provides listening and writing tasks that promote analytical thinking, which is often lacking in university ESL lessons in Japan, but examines the finer details, including teacher/student critiques to produce higher-level presentations. This course is also unique in that it was specifically developed for design majors that need to become familiar with technical language, and provide exercises to challenge them to reveal their innovative talents to serve them after they graduate. The results from the two surveys given to students, one at the half waypoint in the semester, and the other in the last class, showed that they gained confidence in public speaking and increased their listening comprehension and became more aware of the importance of critical thinking and the processes necessary to develop innovative solutions. .
2. Michael William Hall, An ESL Lesson Plan Focusing on Design Concepts to Facilitate Analytical Cognition, Clute Institute , 2016.08.
3. Michael William Hall, A PROPOSAL FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL ENVIORNMENTAL EDUCATION UTILIZING BIOCHAR AS THE CORE IN A PROBLEM BASED LEARNING SCHEME, Involen, 2015.09, Traditional approaches to education in Asia and other advanced countries have focused on memorization as the method to educate our youth, however, the future demands more creative cognitive schemes to stimulate students to meet the future challenges that we will face due to environmental challenges that we have brought on by uncontrolled industrialization. This paper introduces a Problem-based Learning (PBL) approach that utilizes sustainable local carbonized organic material—biochar, which not only acts as a soil amendment to improve vegetable production, in addition, acts as an affordable and an effective carbon sequestration method. Carbon Dioxide and methane levels have reached historical and dangerous levels recently, but little is being done to limit them on a global scale. The author believes that an important step in reducing them and other pressing environmental issues is to educate the primary school students through an educational scheme introduces the basics and builds a strong foundation with local volunteers and experts to produce innovative solutions to solve local problems. If replicated locally on a wide scale it can have a greater impact globally. The three main goals of the scheme are to raise the creative capabilities to transform a problem like the excessive overgrowth of bamboo in western Japan into a productive solution, and to revitalize a community’s social interconnectivity, and restore the natural environment. After consultation with Japanese elementary school teachers, it was decided that ten one-hour workshops could be realistically integrated into the existing 5th grade Japanese annual elementary school science curriculum. Workshop facilitators range from experts in agriculture and environmental studies to local volunteers who are dedicated to protecting the local environment. Creativity and human relations have become muted in present education and society due in part to technology, so this scheme aims to reconnect them to fulfil our potential. .
4. Michael William Hall, A Specially Designed Academic Oral Communication Course to Improve English Interaction Skills for University Students in an Elective ESL Program, Clute Institute, 2015.08, This paper introduces a unique approach to improve university ESL students reading, listening, discussion, and presentation abilities. Currently, the course is divided into two main parts over a 15-week semester for the author’s university class, but could easily be applied to shorter or longer modules. There are six units in total with the first two introducing the author’s original presentation technique material, tailored for a wide range of ESL students from beginner to advanced levels. The second part utilizes TED Talk videos and transcripts that focus on conceptual issues to stimulate stimulating discussions. After the instructor deems students have acquired sufficient presentation and PowerPoint design skills, they advance to the TED Talks portion of the course. They are given the entire English transcript for each selected talk along with a question sheet created to improve their techniques to scan a document for essential information, and the answers provide comprehension of the main talking points. This is assigned as homework and then checked in class. Students compare their answers before the instructor goes over the correct answers to increase analytical discussion opportunities and group cohesion. Next, small group discussion (2 to 3 students) is carried out to address the two to three discussion points provided by the instructor. The group members write down their responses as well as verbally express their opinions on each discussion point. In this case, the students are Japanese sophomores at a pre-intermediate level and have limited English-speaking experience, so the author allows their group discussions to be in Japanese, but the written and the in-class response must be in English. After each group has had its chance to express itself, there is a class discussion facilitated by the instructor to expand upon each point. There are 21 students divided into nine groups in the class introduced in this paper. One class is 90 minutes long, so with twenty-one students, the homework correction, group discussion, and the final class discussion takes an entire period. The final step for each TED Talk unit is a group presentation (2-3 students) from three to five minutes on the main topic, for example, as in unit 3—education. The students are given freedom to choose from a wide variety of directions, from Japanese education issues to systems used in other countries. In addition, they may choose to focus on one side of the topic, or one student can choose one side and the other partner can support the opposing viewpoint. This is the first semester to utilize this material, so it is essential to acquire student evaluations several times during the semester to determine areas of weakness and strength. The first was already completed at the beginning of the semester to ascertain students’ motives for taking this elective course. The second was conducted after seven lessons, and the final will be carried out in the last class at the end of July. The initial survey results indicated a high interest in improving their current difficulties in expressing themselves. The second evaluation revealed that a majority felt their presenting skills had significantly increased after completion of units one and two. However, the difficult vocabulary in the transcripts causes confusion and some frustration, which has reduced some students’ motivation and led to a lack of participation. One remedy is to create clearer question-answer scanning through highlighting significant areas in the transcript paragraphs. Even though this course is only presently used at the author’s Japanese university, it is believed to have practical application in other cultures and in various ESL settings..
5. Michael William Hall, Project-based Learning to Promote Organic Vegetables and Sequester Carbon for a Local Economy in Japan, Clute Institute, 2014.08, This project delivers unique collaborative opportunities for graduate students at the Kyushu University Graduate School of Design and the Agriculture Department to develop original promotional materials and high quality organic vegetables to sell to the local community. During the past two years of this project-based learning (PBL) assignment, students have conducted field surveys, carried out laboratory experiments, gathered surveys at local events, and have learned farming skills from local volunteers. The two years of testing various vegetables grown in three percent, five percent, and the control group without bamboo biochar, have produced results that strongly indicate root vegetables like sweet potatoes, burdock, and carrots production and quality can be significantly increased compared to the non-biochar samples. Due to the positive outcome of the field tests, the next phase of this project will focus on promoting the various benefits of bamboo biochar. It will also include assignments to create original environmental education materials for primary, junior high and high school students. In addition, a new agri-business model will be developed to stimulate a healthier and more profitable farming method in order to attract Japanese youth to support local agriculture and the future needs of the country. Through these practical and collaborative activities with the Agriculture Department and local volunteers, students acquire essential social, practical, and creative skills to manage the possible inclusion into Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which strongly challenge the current system through low-priced imported goods. In addition, this project addresses the increasing negative affects from climate change and trans-boundary air pollution. This PBL supplies graduate students with essential analytical and practical skills necessary to match the future trends and environmental challenges. .
6. Michael William Hall, Utilization of Bamboo Biochar as a Soil Amendment to
Test the Effects on Two Varieties of Sweet Potato: A
Report on Phase Two in a Carbon Sequestrationi and
Local Economic Revitalization Project, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences , 2013.09.
7. Michael William Hall, UTILIZING BAMBOO BIOCHAR FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, Global Conference on Global Warming, 2012.07, This paper introduces a collaborative project that produces and promotes the use of bamboo biochar as a means to sequester carbon, improve the local environment and economy. It involves Master’s students from the Department of Design Strategy at Kyushu University, local volunteer Satoyama members, and support from the Japan Biochar Association. In this initial stage of the project, the students conducted a survey of people living in Fukuoka, Japan to determine their general knowledge about the environment, the carbon credit scheme, and their interest in buying pesticide free vegetables in order to determine if environmental education and promotion is necessary for the success of the project’s goal of using biochar as a means for carbon sequestration and marketing strategy for vegetables. Results showed that there is no knowledge about the carbon credit scheme, only some general environmental awareness, and modest interest in buying pesticide free biochar grown vegetables if more expensive than ones grown under normal conditions. Therefore, the next step will be to develop effective materials and carry out events to educate and promote the positive impacts of the system, and develop production methods that maintain a competitive price to widely used pesticides..
8. Michael William Hall, A Project Utilizing University and Local Tacit Knowledge to Develop a Branding Strategy to Expand the Positive Impacts of Biochar , Asian Pacific Biochar Conference, 2011.09.
9. Michael William Hall, A Project Utilizing University and Local Tacit Knowledge to Develop a Branding Strategy to Expand the Positive Impacts of Biochar , Asian Pacific Biochar Conference, 2011.09.
10. Hall William Michael, UTILIZING BAMBOO BIOCHAR FOR
CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, Global Conference on Global Warming, 2012.07, This paper introduces a collaborative project that produces and promotes the use of bamboo biochar as a means to sequester carbon, improve the local environment and economy. It involves Master’s students from the Department of Design Strategy at Kyushu University, local volunteer Satoyama members, and support from the Japan Biochar Association. In this initial stage of the project, the students conducted a survey of people living in Fukuoka, Japan to determine their general knowledge about the environment, the carbon credit scheme, and their interest in buying pesticide free vegetables in order to determine if environmental education and promotion is necessary for the success of the project’s goal of using biochar as a means for carbon sequestration and marketing strategy for vegetables. Results showed that there is no knowledge about the carbon credit scheme, only some general environmental awareness, and modest interest in buying pesticide free biochar grown vegetables if more expensive than ones grown under normal conditions. Therefore, the next step will be to develop effective materials and carry out events to educate and promote the positive impacts of the system, and develop production methods that maintain a competitive price to widely used pesticides..
11. Proposed a collaborative project based learning program to prevent point source pollution programs at SMEs..
12. The project developed a trial for local children to learn about the ecosystem and enjoy nature..
13. A Proposal for Project Based Learning to Promote a Pollution Prevention Program at Small and Medium-sized Enterprises to Prevent Soil Contamination:
Case Studies from the Printing Sector
.