Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Papers
Michael William Hall Last modified date:2019.06.14

Associate Professor / Social System Design / Department of Design Strategy / Faculty of Design


Papers
1. Michael William Hall, Shinogi Yoshiyuki, Project-based Learning to Promote Organic Vegetables and Sequester Carbon for a Local Economy in Japan, Clute Institute, 2014.09, This project delivers unique collaborative opportunities for graduate students at the Kyushu University Graduate School of Design and the Agriculture Department to develop original promotional materials and high quality organic vegetables to sell to the local community. During the past two years of this project-based learning (PBL) assignment, students have conducted field surveys, carried out laboratory experiments, gathered surveys at local events, and have learned farming skills from local volunteers. The two years of testing various vegetables grown in three percent, five percent, and the control group without bamboo biochar, have produced results that strongly indicate root vegetables like sweet potatoes, burdock, and carrots production and quality can be significantly increased compared to the non-biochar samples. Due to the positive outcome of the field tests, the next phase of this project will focus on promoting the various benefits of bamboo biochar. It will also include assignments to create original environmental education materials for primary, junior high and high school students. In addition, a new agri-business model will be developed to stimulate a healthier and more profitable farming method in order to attract Japanese youth to support local agriculture and the future needs of the country. This PBL supplies graduate students with essential analytical and practical skills necessary to match the future trends and environmental challenges. .
2. Michael William Hall, Utilizing Bamboo Biochar for Carbon Sequestration and Local Economic Development, Causes, Impacts and Solutions to Global Warming Springer Publishing, 643-656, 2013.07, This project is a collaborative one that produces and promotes the use of bamboo biochar as a means to sequester carbon while improving the local environment and economy. It involves Master’s students from the Department of Design Strategy at Kyushu University, Undergraduate and Graduate students from the Department of Agriculture at Kyushu University, local volunteer Satoyama members, and support from the Japan Biochar Association. In this initial stage of the project, the students conducted a survey of people living in Fukuoka, Japan to determine their general knowledge about the environment, the carbon credit scheme, and their interest in buying pesticide free vegetables in order to determine if environmental education and promotion is necessary for the success of the project’s goal of using biochar as a means for carbon sequestration and marketing strategy for vegetables. Results showed that there is no knowledge about the carbon credit scheme, only some general environmental awareness, and modest interest in buying pesticide free biochar grown vegetables if more expensive than ones grown under normal conditions. Therefore, the next step will be to develop effective materials and carry out events to educate and promote the positive impacts of the system, and develop production methods that maintain a competitive price to widely used pesticides..
3. Michael William Hall, Shinogi Yoshiyuki, Utilization of Bamboo Biochar as a Soil Amendment to Test the Effects on Two Varieties of Sweet Potato: A Report on Phase Two in a Carbon Sequestration and Local Economic Revitalization Project, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, 2013.09, The purpose of this collaborative project based learning (PBL) research is to revitalize the local farming economy, improve the local environment, and raise students environmental knowledge through design, science, and contribution. The core group of this PBL consists of Master’s students from the Department of Design Strategy at Kyushu University along with undergraduate and graduate students from the Faculty of Agriculture at the same university. This paper details the results from the second stage and outlines the goals for the third one. The first stage focused on benchmarking of biochar producers and retailers, results from surveying Fukuoka Prefecture consumer’s purchasing attitudes and knowledge, developed packaging and logo proposals, and joined a local Satoyama volunteer group to provide support to the local community. In the second stage, collaboration with Kyushu University’s Agro-environmental Sciences researchers was established to incorporate a more scientific approach to the social and design elements in this PBL.
The surrounding hillsides in the project’s area were densely planted with Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) in the 1950s as a national government policy to reduce the dependence on imported timber; however, these Sugi forests have been neglected over the years because the lumber prices declined making them unprofitable to maintain. In the absence of forest protection, bamboo growth has brought direct and indirect environmental damages. This project aims to convert the overgrowth of bamboo from a natural menace into a positive impact on the local environment and economy through biochar production and utilization.
The school semester begins in April in Japan, so the first task for the second phase was for the students to make bamboo biochar using a portable low cost kiln. This kiln maintains a low oxygen atmosphere and burns at approximately 500oC, which are conditions necessary to produce high quality biochar used as a soil amendment. Likewise, this process delivers a low cost and effective carbon sequestration method. This biochar was then tilled into the test plot at the Satoyama group’s site at 3% and 5% by volume in May. Two varieties of sweet potato were planted in two 20-meter long rows, one with the biochar mix and the control row without it. During the summer, students removed the weeds several times, and the Satoyama members watered the plot when necessary.
In October, the potatoes were harvested and the total weight of the biochar and control group was measured. Samples were sent to the Agriculture Department members to analyze the brix content. Results were mixed: the total weight of potatoes grown in the biochar-amended soil was 20.2 kilograms more than the potatoes from the control group. However, the brix content was not significantly different for the two sets. The positive aspect of greater harvest for the biochar group is encouraging, but testing at the same plot will continue for the next two years to determine if there is any change in the brix levels, condition of the soil, and health of the plants.
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4. Michael William Hall, Utilizing Bamboo Biochar for Carbon Sequestration and Local Economic Development, Global Conference on Global Warming 2012, 7-7, 2012.07, This project is a collaborative one that produces and promotes the use of bamboo biochar as a means to sequester carbon while improving the local environment and economy. It involves Master’s students from the Department of Design Strategy at Kyushu University, Undergraduate and Graduate students from the Department of Agriculture at Kyushu University, local volunteer Satoyama members, and support from the Japan Biochar Association. In this initial stage of the project, the students conducted a survey of people living in Fukuoka, Japan to determine their general knowledge about the environment, the carbon credit scheme, and their interest in buying pesticide free vegetables in order to determine if environmental education and promotion is necessary for the success of the project’s goal of using biochar as a means for carbon sequestration and marketing strategy for vegetables. Results showed that there is no knowledge about the carbon credit scheme, only some general environmental awareness, and modest interest in buying pesticide free biochar grown vegetables if more expensive than ones grown under normal conditions. Therefore, the next step will be to develop effective materials and carry out events to educate and promote the positive impacts of the system, and develop production methods that maintain a competitive price to widely used pesticides..
5. Michael Hall, A Project Utilizing University and Local Tacit Knowledge to Develop a Branding Strategy to Expand the Positive Impacts of Biochar, Asian Pacific Biochar Conference Kyoto, 2011.09, The author created this project to be carried out by Master’s students and teaching staff from the Department of Design and Agriculture of Kyushu University to develop an effective branding strategy that will bring a better understanding about the benefits of this environmentally friendly product to farmers, home gardeners, and to apartment dwelling veranda growers and promote local development..
6. Michael Hall, University-Industry Project Based Learning to Promote a Pollution Prevention Program for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, World Universities Congress Proceedings, Proceeding Vol II page 946-957, 2010.10.
7. Michael Hall and Kengo Saeki, Project Based Learning to Promote Conservation on a Hillside in Japan, North American Association for Environmental Education, Proceeding page 7, 2010.09.
8. Michael Hall, A Proposal for Project Based Learning to Promote a Pollution Prevention Program at Small and Medium-sized Enterprises to Prevent Soil Contamination:
Case Studies from the Printing Sector (full paper)
, International Conference on Applied Business Research , pp. 443-462, 2009.09.
9. Michael W. Hall, A Study on Collaborative Environmental Risk Management: Modeling to Facilitate the Prevention of Soil Contamination by Local Governments, Businesses, and Local Stakeholders
(Doctoral dissertation), 202 pages, 2007.01.
10. Michael W. Hall, Kousuke Miyaji, A Comparative Study of Leading U.S. and Japanese Firms Risk Management Policies:In Search of New Risk
Management Strategies
, National Association of Environmental Professionals , National Association of Environmental Professionals 30th
Annual Conference
pp.1-11, 2005.04.
11. The Importance of Including Soil Contamination Measures in Environmental Risk Management Systems.
12. Michael W. Hall, Kousuke Miyaji, In Search of New Risk Management Strategies Using a Comparative Evaluation of Environmental Laws for Soil Contamination in the United States, Germany and Japan
, 2004 IEEE International Engineering Management , 2004 IEEE International Engineering
Management Conference Volume 1
pp.27-31, 2004.10.
13. Michael W. Hall, Customer Derived Revenue: A Dynamic Model of Creation
, Information Resources Management Association, IRMA International Conference
pp.168~170, 2003.05.
14. Michael W. Hall, A Survey of Fukuoka Supermarket Consumers on Packaging and Organic Vegetable Buying Patterns, Nakamura Gakuen Journal, 中村学園大学流通科学研究第2巻第1号
pp.95~99, 2002.11.
15. Michael W. Hall, Value Creation Through Customer Derived Revenue
, 経営情報学会, 経営情報学会2002年度
全国研究発表大会予稿集
pp.104~107, 2002.11.
16. Junji Matsuda, Michael W. Hall, A Dynamic Mechanism of Value Creation: A Model for Intangible Assets
, Information Resources Management Association, IRMA International Conference
pp.261~262, 2002.05.
17. Michael W. Hall, An IT Revolution in the Hakata Dockyard System
, Nakamura Gakuen Journal, 中村学園大学流通科
学研究第1巻第2号
(pp.73~77), 2002.03.
18. Michael W. Hall, A Case Study of a Micro Vegetable Grower in Fukuoka Prefecture
, Nakamura Gakuen Journal, 中村学園大学流通科学
研究創刊号
pp.42~56, 2001.03.
19. Michael W. Hall, An 0verview of U.S Farming Operations: Implications of E- commerce in Agriculture
, Nakamura Gakuen Journal, 中村学園大学研究紀要
第33号
pp.131~139, 2001.03.