Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
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Takefumi MOKUDAI Last modified date:2019.05.23



Graduate School


E-Mail
Phone
092-802-6901
Fax
092-802-6901
Academic Degree
Ph.D
Country of degree conferring institution (Overseas)
No
Field of Specialization
Management of Technology, Corporate Strategy
Total Priod of education and research career in the foreign country
00years00months
Outline Activities
I resarch strategic management on technology in automotive industry. Current research topics are 1) architectural analysis on module strategy of automakers; 2) evolution of suppler systems; and 3) development of automotive parts clusters in Kyushu, Tohoku and Chugoku region in Japan.
I teach Strategic Management and Production Operations Management at Kyushu University Business School (QBS) and seminar for doctoral students at AMS.
Social activities: 1)Lecturer of corporate education for engineers and managers; 2) Member of advisory committees on industrial policies for automotive industry in Kyushu and Chugoku region.
Research
Research Interests
  • Analysis on strategies for vehicle electrification from real option reasoning approach
    keyword : electric vehicle, uncertainty, real option, strategy
    2016.04~2019.03.
  • Module strategy in automotive industry
    keyword : automotive industry, modularity, architecture, production strategy
    2002.04.
  • Development of cluster of automotive suppliers
    keyword : automotive industry, suppliers, industrial cluster
    2001.04.
Current and Past Project
  • Lean Production System (LPS) has been introduced not only by manufacturing but also service sectors across the world.
    However, not all firms have succeeded in introducing and running the LPS. As noted later, we consider that one of major causes of the failure can be attributed to insufficient visualization of the lean transformation process and its consequences.
    For this reason, this project aims at (1) developing mapping tools, which visually represent value creating processes in a production line; (2) defining metrics to measure consequences of the lean transformation. With these analytical tools, the project empirically assesses interlinkages of the introduction of LPS practices, lean transformation, and economic consequences.
  • This study focuses on the meanings and impacts of modular strategies, e.g. Volkswagen’s Modular Transverse Matrix (MQB), Nissan’s Common Module Family (CMF), Mazda’s Common Architecture, and Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA). We collectively call these vehicle development initiatives “Mega-platforms,” and analyze influences of mega-platforms to production systems and supply chain.
Academic Activities
Papers
1. Zuhara Chavez, Takefumi Mokudai, Divergence between Value Stream Mapping Western Understanding and Material and Information Flow Chart Principles: A Japanese Automotive Supplier’s Perspective, Journal of Service Science and Management, 10.4236/jssm.2018.112016, 11, 2, 219-241, 2018.04, Through visualization, mapping techniques help manufacturing organizations prioritize and guide improvement strategies. For this reason, mapping of the value chain is applied as a method of progress toward lean manufacturing. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the essence of the material and information flow chart (MIFC) approach, known as value stream mapping (VSM) in the West, to provide a different perspective and understanding and to identify its manner of integration with measurement systems. Metrics complement mapping tools allow the tracking of various stages of an organization’s lean journey and continuous improvement (CI). While the time dimension is predominant in performance metrics in lean environments, these metrics do not link the economic factor directly to improvements. The research comprises a case study in which lessons are learned from tool placing and metric determination. Empirical research included critical case sampling and semi-structured interviews, and data were analyzed to compare the conventional Western understanding of VSM with that of a Japanese supplier that learned the principles directly from the source and applied their own version of MIFC. An understanding of the tool based on core knowledge will enable organizations to reevaluate their current measurement systems and choose more suitable ones..
2. Selection of Electrification Technologies of Automotive Powertrains and Uncertainty Management Strategy.
3. Design Principles of Renault-Nissan’s Common Module Family and Mazda’s Common Architecture.
4. 目代 武史, Will Cars Be Modularized? New Vehicle Development Approaches of Renault-Nissan and Mazda, Proceedings of Scientific Forum for Mobility 2015, 2015.06, This study illustrates Renault-Nissan’s Common Module Family (CMF) and Mazda’s Common Architecture (CA), and discusses their differences and implications for modular product development.
Global carmakers face a dilemma of emergent markets. Growing demands in emergent markets have put pressures to develop wider variety of models at lower costs, while tightening requirements on vehicle safety and fuel economy have increased complexity of vehicle engineering. Realization of modularity is one of solutions for the dilemma between cost reduction via commonality and enhancement of vehicle performance and variety.
Renault-Nissan’s CMF is an approach that creates various models by changing combinations of four physical modules and a set of electric/electronic units. The four modules include engine compartment, cockpit, front and rear under bodies. Each has two to three variations, e.g. light, middle, and heavy under bodies. Majority of engineering works will complete by selecting modules from the matrix of the modules and their pre-developed variants.
Mazda takes a different approach. Although it retains traditional platform structure, CA creates various models flexibly by copying the common design rules, e.g. engineering principles and standard structures, to successive models in the same shape but in different size.
The study discusses why the two Japanese carmakers take different approaches to meet the same challenge. With larger product variety, sales volume and more production plants Renault-Nissan can justify heavier investments in its advanced development to build finer matrix of the technological platform, i.e. CMF, while Mazda, with annual sales of only 1.3 million units, prefers a less modularized approach. .
5. Localization of parts supply toward strengthening competitiveness of Automotive industry in Kyushu.
6. Achievements and challengs of module strategy in automotive industry: A comparative study of European and Japanese automakers.
7. Transformation in product architecture and dynamics of product development organizations: A case study on product development of an automotive center panel module.
Presentations
1. A Study of Toyota Hybrid System as Real Options.
2. A Preliminary Study of Toyota Hybrid System as Real Options.
3. Takefumi MOKUDAI, Managing Supply Chain Disruptions: Lessons of Japanese Industries, AGSB Forum "The Contingency Plan: Managing the Risk of Business Disruptions" , 2017.08.
4. 目代 武史, Convergence and Divergence of Vehicle Development toward Modularity: A Comparative Study of European and Japanese Carmakers, Innovation in the East-Asian Automotive Industry, 2015.06, Modularization is one of the solutions to address a dilemma between ever-advancing vehicle functionalities and increasing pressures to lower development and production costs. In the automotive industry, a number of carmakers have been paving the way for modularity-in-design. This paper illustrates the movement toward modular vehicle developments by one European and two Japanese carmakers, and discusses their similarities and differences. Through in-depth case studies, this paper identifies the working principles of VW’s Modular Transverse Matrix (MQB), Renault-Nissan’s Common Module Family (CMF), and Mazda’s Common Architecture (CA). Both MQB and CMF build a fine matrix of modules and their variants and develop a variety of models by the mix and match of the modules with standardized interfaces. Meanwhile, CA places priority on design similarity rather than the commonization of physical components. The paper also analyzes underlying factors that lead to differences in the modular approaches. With a large variety of products and a big worldwide volume of sales, VW and Renault-Nissan can justify large-scale investments in their advanced development to build a finer matrix of modules, while a full-scale modular approach would be too risky to employ for a small-size carmaker like Mazda. .
5. 目代 武史, Will cars be modularized? New vehicle development approaches of Renault-Nissan and Mazda. , Scientific Forum for Mobility, 2015.07, This study illustrates Renault-Nissan’s Common Module Family (CMF) and Mazda’s Common Architecture (CA), and discusses their differences and implications for modular product development.
Global carmakers face a dilemma of emergent markets. Growing demands in emergent markets have put pressures to develop wider variety of models at lower costs, while tightening requirements on vehicle safety and fuel economy have increased complexity of vehicle engineering. Realization of modularity is one of solutions for the dilemma between cost reduction via commonality and enhancement of vehicle performance and variety.
Renault-Nissan’s CMF is an approach that creates various models by changing combinations of four physical modules and a set of electric/electronic units. The four modules include engine compartment, cockpit, front and rear under bodies. Each has two to three variations, e.g. light, middle, and heavy under bodies. Majority of engineering works will complete by selecting modules from the matrix of the modules and their pre-developed variants.
Mazda takes a different approach. Although it retains traditional platform structure, CA creates various models flexibly by copying the common design rules, e.g. engineering principles and standard structures, to successive models in the same shape but in different size.
The study discusses why the two Japanese carmakers take different approaches to meet the same challenge. With larger product variety, sales volume and more production plants Renault-Nissan can justify heavier investments in its advanced development to build finer matrix of the technological platform, i.e. CMF, while Mazda, with annual sales of only 1.3 million units, prefers a less modularized approach. .
6. Module strategies of automotive makers: From descriptve study to explanatory analysis.
7. Achievements and challenges of module production systems: Cross plant comparison of European automakers.
8. Modularization strategies of Japanese automakers and an international comparison with Western automakers: Implications for Japanese automakers' Asian strategies and environmental strategies.
9. Logic and limitations of optimizing product architecture using design structure matrix.
Membership in Academic Society
  • The International Association of Engineers
  • The Academic Association for Organizational Science
  • Japan Society of Business Administration
  • Japan Academy of International Business Studies
  • Japan Academy of Small Business Studies
Educational
Educational Activities
I teach Strategic Management and Production Operations Management at Kyushu University Business School (QBS) as well as Advanced Study on Automotive Science E at Department of Automotive Science (AMS), Graduate School of Integrated Sciences.
Since QBS is a professional school, the majority of students have around 10 years working experiences. To take full advantage of the working profiles of the students, I use interactive teaching methods, such as class discussion, group works, and case teaching methods in addition to ordinary lectures.
At AMS I am in charge only of doctoral programs. We address research questions inspired from actual problems in the industry from an academic perspective.
Currently seminars are taken place for master's and doctoral students. Students survey and discuss intensively academic literatures on strategic management on technology and innovations. Field research such as plant tour to local automakers and suppliers are also implemented.
Social
Professional and Outreach Activities
Instructor in training program, "Tourism development and environmental protection" at JICA Chugoku from 2002 to 2005. .