Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Presentations
Akito Yasuda Last modified date:2019.06.17

Associate Professor / Division for Humanities and Social Sciences / Faculty of Arts and Science


Presentations
1. Akito Yasuda, Hunting and wild meat eating in Japan, World Social Science Forum 2018, 2018.08, In recent years, human-wildlife conflicts, notably against wild boar and deer, have become a serious problem in Japan. Particularly highlighted has been agricultural crop damage, the damage of which has caused an average loss of 20.4 billion yen annually between 1999 and 2016, peaking at 23.8 billion yen in 2010. In effort to regulate the noxious wildlife population, hunting of specific species is permitted throughout the year, regardless of the hunting seasons. In 2016, approximately 520,000 wild boars and 590,000 deer were captured between common hunting and pest control efforts. However, only 83,000 were made available for human consumption, which makes merely 7.5 percent of the total captured. Conversely, this means that the remaining 92.5 percent was disposed of through either burial or incineration.
The Government of Japan and Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) reacted to this trend by implementing a new policy to promote wild meat consumption to better utilize the captured wildlife, along with local economic revitalization. The mass media took up this initiative which resulted in the current “gibier (wild meat) boom”.
How will such social trends to promote such forms of resource use impact human-wildlife relations? This paper will attempt to untangle the history of hunting and the consumption of wild meat in Japan, and also discuss the future prospects of human-wildlife relations through showcasing actual practices of hunting and wild meat utilization.
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2. Akito Yasuda, Recreational hunting in Cameroon:“Meat” or “Poison” for local community, Vth International Wildlife Management Congress, 2015.07, Recreational hunting is one of the oldest known tourism activities using wildlife. Leader-Williams (2009) defined it as the hunting where the hunter or hunters pursue their quarry for recreation or pleasure. Some researchers have suggested that controlled recreational hunting can benefit the development of local communities in Third world, thereby promoting the protection of wildlife resources as well as both ecological and economic sustainability. However, important debates remain regarding the social impacts of conservation and tourism on local communities.
This presentation aimed to introduce a social impact of recreational hunting on local community in Cameroon. Approximately two years of fieldwork, mainly based on interviews and observations, showed that recreational hunting in North Province, Cameroon generated tax revenues more than safari in National parks did. A part of economical benefits shared with local communities as profit sharing and employment opportunities. However, the local inhabitants were affected by regulations of their rights to use natural resources. Moreover, some villages experienced forced migration because of the beginning of hunting tourism in this area.
Recreational hunting brings to local community not only positive impacts such as profit sharing and employment opportunity, but also negative one as control of the livelihoods of local people and forced migration. Even if recreational hunting can play an important role in community conservation and wildlife management with its great economic benefit, the independence of local people and their connection with wildlife should be considered to re-conceptualize "Sustainability".
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3. 安田 章人, Recreational hunting in Africa: “Meat” or “Poison” for local community
, XVIII ISA (International Sociological Association) World Congress of Sociology2014, 2014.07, [URL], Recreational hunting is one of the oldest known tourism activities using wildlife. Leader-Williams (2009) defined recreational hunting as the hunting where the hunter or hunters pursue their quarry for recreation or pleasure. Same as in colonial period, hunters, mainly from Europe and U.S.A., range over hill and dale in developing country to obtain trophy of big game and their pleasure.
Some researchers have suggested that controlled recreational hunting can benefit the development of local communities, thereby promoting the protection of wildlife resources as well as both ecological and economic sustainability. However, important debates remain regarding the social impacts of conservation and tourism on local communities.
This presentation aimed to introduce a social impact of recreational hunting on local community in Cameroon. Approximately two years of fieldwork, mainly based on interviews and observations, showed that recreational hunting in North Province, Cameroon generated tax revenues of approximately 0.9 million US dollars in 2009/2010, that is, 200 times as large as than safari in National parks did in the same year. A part of economical benefits shared with local communities as profit sharing and employment opportunities. However, the local inhabitants were affected by regulations of their rights to use natural resources. Moreover, some villages experienced forced migration because of the beginning of hunting tourism in this area.
Recreational hunting brings to local community not only positive impacts such as profit sharing and employment opportunity, but also negative one as control of the livelihoods of local people and forced migration. Even if recreational hunting can play an important role in community conservation and wildlife conservation with its great economic benefit, the independence of local people and their connection with wildlife should be considered to re-conceptualize "Sustainability".
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4. Killing for "Protection"? "Sustainability" of sport hunting in Africa and local community .
5. Akito Yasuda, The Concept of Sustainability and the Social Influences of Sport Hunting on the Livelihoods of Local People: A Case Study of Bénoué National Park, Cameroon., Perspectives on human-nature relationships in Africa: Interrelations between epistemology and practice, 2012.09.
6. Yasuda, A. "the solution of global environmental problem from "Negative stage"; Wildlife and Sport hunting in Northern Cameroon", Symposium of ILEK project, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Kyoto Heian Hotel, Japan, Sep. 17th, 2012..
7. Akito Yasuda, The village named "obligation": forced migration of local people for sport hunting in North Province, Cameroon, Society and Natural Resources, The 18th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, 2012.06.
8. Yasuda, A. "Killing for Conservation? Potential and Problem on sport hunting in Africa", Society for the Study of Human Animal Relation, Tokyo Uni., Mar. 11th, 2012..
9. Yasuda, A. "Light and Shadow of Sport hunting; Community Conservation, Ethical Critics and Local Community", Tokyo University of Agriculture, Wildlife Conservation Society Japan, Oct. 15th, 2011..
10. Yasuda, A. "Sport hunting and Community Conservation", Japan Association For African Studies, Hirosaki Uni., Japan, May 22th, 2011..
11. Akito Yasuda, The concept of sustainability and the social influences of sport hunting on the livelihoods of local people: A case study of Bénoué National Park, Cameroon, Society and Natural Resources, The 16th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, 2010.06.
12. Yasuda, A. "Wildlife management and conservation, report from Africa", Green Forum 3, Wildlife Conservation Society Japan, youth Group, Seminar House in Hachioji, Japan, May 15th, 2010..
13. Akito Yasuda, The impacts of sport hunting on the livelihoods of local people: A case study of Bénoué National Park, Cameroon, コンゴ盆地森林居住民の文化と現代的課題, 2010.03.
14. Yasuda, A. "Local community and the Resourcialization of Wildlife on sport hunting in Benoue National Park, Cameroon", MINPAKU Seminar for youth researcher, National Museum of Ethnology, Nov. 25th, 2009. .
15. Akito Yasuda, The Impact of Sport Hunting on the Local People in North Province, Cameroon, International Symposium Biological Conservation and Local Community's Needs Lessons from Field Studies on Nature-Dependent Societies, 2009.02.
16. Yasuda, A. "Problems of Sport hunting in Africa; Sustainability and Local Community", Wildlife Conservation Society Japan, Nagasaki International Uni., Nov. 8th, 2008..
17. Akito Yasuda, The significance of sport hunting in conservation policy and impact on the livelihood of the local people: A case study of Bénoué National Park, Cameroon, International Workshop Re-conceptualization of wildlife conservation: toward resonatable action for living people, 2008.08.
18. Yasuda, A. "Killing for Conservation?; Potential and Problem of Sport hunting in Africa", the Japanese Association for Environmental Sociology, Minakami, Gunma, Japan, June 8th, 2008..
19. Yasuda, A. "The relationship between local people and conservation policy in Benoue National park, Cameroon; dependence on and conflict over sport hunting", The Society for Ecological Anthropology, Takeo Onsen Heights, Saga, Japan, Mar. 21st, 2006..
20. Yasuda, A. "The relationship between local community and hunting zone in Benoue National Park, Cameroon", Japan Association For African Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, May 28th, 2005..