Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
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Yuki Sato Last modified date:2019.05.30





Phone
092-642-6049
Fax
092-642-6923
Academic Degree
Ph.D in Biological science
Country of degree conferring institution (Overseas)
No
Field of Specialization
Developmental Biology, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Biological Imaging
ORCID(Open Researcher and Contributor ID)
0000-0001-8974-2059
Total Priod of education and research career in the foreign country
03years00months
Research
Research Interests
  • Blood vessels display hierarchal network patterns corresponding to the blood volume in a central to peripheral manner. To understand the roles of blood flow in the vascular patterning process, we aim to experimentally manipulate the bloodstream by using an artificial heart pump. Through this manipulation, we aim to elucidate the correlation between blood flow and endothelial cell behavior, as well as simulate the process of vascular patterning. The ultimate goal of this study is to achieve complete control of blood vessel networks through manipulation of blood flow at a single point.
    keyword : Developmental biology, Blood vessels, Patterning
    2014.04~2017.03.
Current and Past Project
  • Blood vessels display hierarchal network patterns corresponding to the blood volume in a central to peripheral manner. To understand the roles of blood flow in the vascular patterning process, we aim to experimentally manipulate the bloodstream by using an artificial heart pump. Through this manipulation, we aim to elucidate the correlation between blood flow and endothelial cell behavior, as well as simulate the process of vascular patterning. The ultimate goal of this study is to achieve complete control of blood vessel networks through manipulation of blood flow at a single point.
Academic Activities
Papers
1. Yuki Sato, Kei Nagatoshi, Ayumi Hamano, Yuko Imamura, David Huss, Seiichi Uchida, Rusty Lansford, Basal filopodia and vascular mechanical stress organize fibronectin into pillars bridging the mesoderm-endoderm gap, Development (Cambridge), 10.1242/dev.141259, 144, 2, 281-291, 2017.01, Cells may exchange information with other cells and tissues by exerting forces on the extracellular matrix (ECM). Fibronectin (FN) is an important ECM component that forms fibrils through cell contacts and creates directionally biased geometry. Here, we demonstrate that FN is deposited as pillars between widely separated germ layers, namely the somitic mesoderm and the endoderm, in quail embryos. Alongside the FN pillars, long filopodia protrude from the basal surfaces of somite epithelial cells. Loss-of-function of Ena/VASP, α5β1-integrins or talin in the somitic cells abolished the FN pillars, indicating that FN pillar formation is dependent on the basal filopodia through these molecules. The basal filopodia and FN pillars are also necessary for proper somite morphogenesis. We identified a new mechanism contributing to FN pillar formation by focusing on cyclic expansion of adjacent dorsal aorta. Maintenance of the directional alignment of the FN pillars depends on pulsatile blood flow through the dorsal aortae. These results suggest that the FN pillars are specifically established through filopodia-mediated and pulsating force-related mechanisms..
2. Yuki Sato, Greg Poynter, David Huss, Michael B. Filla, Andras Czirok, Brenda J. Rongish, Charles D. Little, Scott E. Fraser, Rusty Lansford, Dynamic analysis of vascular morphogenesis using transgenic quail embryos., PLoS One, 5, 9, 2010.09, One of the least understood and most central questions confronting biologists is how initially simple clusters or sheet-like cell collectives can assemble into highly complex three-dimensional functional tissues and organs. Due to the limits of oxygen diffusion, blood vessels are an essential and ubiquitous presence in all amniote tissues and organs. Vasculogenesis, the de novo self-assembly of endothelial cell (EC) precursors into endothelial tubes, is the first step in blood vessel formation. Static imaging and in vitro models are wholly inadequate to capture many aspects of vascular pattern formation in vivo, because vasculogenesis involves dynamic changes of the endothelial cells and of the forming blood vessels, in an embryo that is changing size and shape. We have generated Tie1 transgenic quail lines Tg(tie1:H2B-eYFP) that express H2B-eYFP in all of their endothelial cells which permit investigations into early embryonic vascular morphogenesis with unprecedented clarity and insight. By combining the power of molecular genetics with the elegance of dynamic imaging, we follow the precise patterning of endothelial cells in space and time. We show that during vasculogenesis within the vascular plexus, ECs move independently to form the rudiments of blood vessels, all while collectively moving with gastrulating tissues that flow toward the embryo midline. The aortae are a composite of somatic derived ECs forming its dorsal regions and the splanchnic derived ECs forming its ventral region. The ECs in the dorsal regions of the forming aortae exhibit variable mediolateral motions as they move rostrally; those in more ventral regions show significant lateral-to-medial movement as they course rostrally. The present results offer a powerful approach to the major challenge of studying the relative role(s) of the mechanical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of vascular development. In past studies, the advantages of the molecular genetic tools available in mouse were counterbalanced by the limited experimental accessibility needed for imaging and perturbation studies. Avian embryos provide the needed accessibility, but few genetic resources. The creation of transgenic quail with labeled endothelia builds upon the important roles that avian embryos have played in previous studies of vascular development..
3. Yuki Sato, Tadayoshi Watanabe, Daisuke Saito, Teruaki Takahashi, Shosei Yoshida, Jun Kohyama, Emi Ohata, Hideyuki Okano, Yoshiko Takahashi, Notch signaling mediates the segmental specification of angioblasts in somites and their directed migration toward the dorsal aorta in avian embryos, Developmental Cell, 10.1016/j.devcel.2008.03.024, 14, 890-901, 2008.06.
4. Yuki Sato, Toshiharu Kasai, Shinichi Nakagawa, Koji Tanabe, Koichi Kawakami, Yoshiko Takahashi , Stable integration and conditional expression of electroporated transgenes in chicken embryos, Developmental Biology, 10.1016/j.ydbio.2007.01.043, 305, 616-624, 2007.02.
Presentations
1. Yuki Sato, Vascular mechanical stress organizes Fibronectin into pillars bridging tissue gap, The 54th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society of Japan, 2016.11.
2. Yuki Sato, Kei Nagatoshi , Yuko Imamura , Basal Fillopodia and Vascular Pulsing Organize Fibronectin into Pillars That Bridge Somites and the Endoderm, Asia-Pacific Developmental Biology Conference, 2015.09.
Membership in Academic Society
  • The Molecular Biology Society of Japan
  • Japan Society for Cell Biology
  • Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists