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Naoya Tate Last modified date:2019.06.26



Graduate School
Undergraduate School


E-Mail
Homepage
http://naoya-tate.net/index_e.html
Naoya TATE .net .
Phone
092-802-3694
Academic Degree
Ph.D. degrees in information science
Country of degree conferring institution (Overseas)
No
Field of Specialization
Nanophotonic information processing
Total Priod of education and research career in the foreign country
00years00months
Research
Research Interests
  • Nano-photonic information system
    keyword : Information photonics, Nanophotonics
    2014.10~2018.03.
Academic Activities
Books
1. Naoya Tate, "Nanophotonics-Based Self-optimization for Macro-optical Applications" in Nanophotonic Information Physics: Nanointelligence and Nanophotonic Computing, Springer, 2017.01.
Papers
1. Naoya Tate, Makoto Naruse, Nanoscale hierarchical optical interactions for secure information, Nanophotonics, 10.1515/nanoph-2016-0134, 6, 3, 613-622, 2017.05, We propose a novel method for observing and utilizing nanometrically fluctuating signals due to optical near-field interactions between a probe and target in near-field optical microscopy. Based on a hierarchical structure of the interactions, it is possible to obtain signals that represent two-dimensional spatial patterns without requiring any scanning process. Such signals reveal individual features of each target, and these features, when appropriately extracted and defined, can be used in security applications—an approach that we call nanophotonic security. As an experimental demonstration, output signals due to interactions between a SiO2 probe and Al nanorods were observed by using near-field optical microscopy at a single readout point, and these signals were quantitatively evaluated using an algorithm that we developed for extracting and defining features that can be used for security applications..
2. Naoya Tate, Tadashi Kawazoe, Wataru Nomura, Motoichi Ohtsu, Shunsuke Nakashima, Development of Zinc Oxide Spatial Light Modulator for High-Yield Speckle Modulation, IEICE Transactions on Electronics, 10.1587/transele.E99.C.1264, E99-C, 11, 1264-1270, 2016.11, In order to realize high-yield speckle modulation, we developed a novel spatial light modulator using zinc oxide single crystal doped with nitrogen ions. The distribution of dopants was optimized to induce characteristic optical functions by applying an annealing method developed by us. The device is driven by a current in the in-plane direction, which induces magnetic fields. These fields strongly interact with the doped material, and the spatial distribution of the refractive index is correspondingly modulated via external control. Using this device, we experimentally demonstrated speckle modulation, and we discuss the quantitative superiority of our approach..
3. Tsutomu Matsumoto, Naoki Yoshida, Shumpei Nishio, Morihisa Hoga, Yasuyuki Ohyagi, Naoya Tate, Makoto Naruse, Optical nano artifact metrics using silicon random nanostructures, Scientific Reports, 10.1038/srep32438, 6, 32438, 2016.09, Nano-artifact metrics exploit unique physical attributes of nanostructured matter for authentication and clone resistance, which is vitally important in the age of Internet-of-Things where securing identities is critical. However, expensive and huge experimental apparatuses, such as scanning electron microscopy, have been required in the former studies. Herein, we demonstrate an optical approach to characterise the nanoscale-precision signatures of silicon random structures towards realising low-cost and high-value information security technology. Unique and versatile silicon nanostructures are generated via resist collapse phenomena, which contains dimensions that are well below the diffraction limit of light. We exploit the nanoscale precision ability of confocal laser microscopy in the height dimension; our experimental results demonstrate that the vertical precision of measurement is essential in satisfying the performances required for artifact metrics. Furthermore, by using state-of-the-art nanostructuring technology, we experimentally fabricate clones from the genuine devices. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the genuine and clone devices are successfully exploited, showing that the liveness-detection-type approach, which is widely deployed in biometrics, is valid in artificially-constructed solid-state nanostructures. These findings pave the way for reasonable and yet sufficiently secure novel principles for information security based on silicon random nanostructures and optical technologies..
4. Naoya Tate, Tadashi Kawazoe, Wataru Nomura, Motoichi Ohtsu, Current-induced giant polarization rotation using a ZnO single crystal doped with nitrogen ions, Scientific Reports, 10.1038/srep12762, 5, 12762, 2015.08, Giant polarization rotation in a ZnO single crystal was experimentally demonstrated based on a novel phenomenon occurring at the nanometric scale. The ZnO crystal was doped with N+ and N2+ ions serving as p-type dopants. By applying an in-plane current using a unique arrangement of electrodes on the device, current-induced polarization rotation of the incident light was observed. From the results of experimental demonstrations and discussions, it was verified that this novel behavior originates from a specific distribution of dopants and the corresponding light–matter interactions in a nanometric space, which are allowed by the existence of such a dopant distribution..
5. Naoya Tate, Makoto Naruse, Tsutomu Matsumoto, Morihisa Hoga, Yasuyuki Ohyagi, Shumpei Nishio, Wataru Nomura, Motoichi Ohtsu, Non-scanning optical near-field microscopy for nanophotonic security, Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, 121, 4, 1383-1387, 2015.07, We propose a novel method for observing and utilizing nanometrically fluctuating signals due to optical near-field interactions between a probe and target in near-field optical microscopy. Based on a hierarchical structure of the interactions, it is possible to obtain signals that represent two-dimensional spatial patterns without requiring any scanning process. Such signals reveal individual features of each target, and these features, when appropriately extracted and defined, can be used in security applications—an approach that we call nanophotonic security. As an experimental demonstration, output signals due to interactions between a SiO2 probe and Al nanorods were observed by using near-field optical microscopy at a single readout point, and these signals were quantitatively evaluated using an algorithm that we developed for extracting and defining features that can be used for security applications..
Presentations
1. Naoya Tate, Tadashi Kawazoe, High-efficiency wavelength conversion material based on nano-scale optical near-field interactions, 5th Japan-Korea Joint Symposium on Advanced Solar Cells 2018 (2nd International Symposium on Energy Research and Application), 2018.02.
2. Naoya Tate, Nanoscale character extraction for nano-optical metric system, The 7th Korea-Japan Workshop on Digital Holography and Information Photonics (DHIP2017), 2017.12.
3. Naoya Tate, Nanophotonics-based optical energy conversion for solar cell applications, 4th Japan-Korea Joint Symposium on Advance Solar Cells 2017, 2017.02.
Membership in Academic Society
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • The Optical Society
  • The Japan Society of Applied Physics
Awards
  • Nanophotonic code embedded in embossed hologram for hierarchical information retrieval
  • Nanophotonic code embedded in embossed hologram for hierarchical information retrieval
  • Hierarchical Hologram based on Nanophotonic Coding