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Takafumi Maeda Last modified date:2018.09.04

Professor / Physiological Anthropology
Department of Human Science
Faculty of Design


Graduate School
Undergraduate School
Other Organization
Other
Administration Post
Other


E-Mail
Homepage
http://www.design.kyushu-u.ac.jp/~maeda/index_e.html
Academic Degree
PhD, DMSc
Field of Specialization
Physiological Anthropology, Environmental Ergonomics, Thermal Physiology
Research
Research Interests
  • Physiological Polymorphism of Cold-induced Thermogenesis and Vasoconstriction in Human
    keyword : Physiological Anthropology, Environmental Adaptability, Cold Tolerance, Physiological Polymorphism
    2014.04~2020.03.
  • Evaluation method for the actibity of Brown Adipose Tissue
    keyword : Environmental Adaptability, Cold Tolerance, Brown Adipose Tissue
    2015.04~2019.03.
  • Evaluation of Thermoregulation Ability and its modifying factors
    keyword : Environmental Adaptability, Thermoregulation Ability, Lifesyle, Living Environment
    2000.04.
  • Effects of Humidity on Human Immno Function
    keyword : Humidity, Immuno Function, Stress
    2010.04.
  • Effects of Indoor Environmental Factors (Air Temperature, Air Movement, Humidity, Air Quality) and Local Thermal Stimuli on Mental Task Performance
    keyword : Task Performance, Cold, Hot, Local Heating, Local Cooling, CO2, air velocity, relative humidity
    2010.04.
Academic Activities
Books
1. Alan H. Bittles, Michael L. Black, Katherine Brooke-Wavell, Anthony G. Comuzzie, Ralph M. Garruto, Paul Higgins, Shigekazu Higuchi, Koichi Iwanaga, John Komlos, Susumu Kudo, Michael A. Little, Takafumi Maeda, Robert M. Malina, Neil J. Mannsfield, C.G. Nicholas Mascie-Taylor, Lawrence M. Schell, Yoshiaki Sone, Kazuo Tanishita, Stanley Ulijaszek, V. Saroja Voruganti, Charles A. Weitz, Akira Yasukouchi, Human Variation:From the Laboratory to the Field, CRC Press, 2010.03.
2. Takafumi Maeda, Toshio Kobayashi, Kazuko Tanaka, Akihiko Sato, Shin-Ya Kaneko, Masatoshi Tanaka他, Environmental Ergonomics, Elsevier Ltd, 2005.06.
3. 高橋鷹志、渡辺秀俊、下村義弘、前田享史、小林宏光、石橋圭太、岩永光一、岩切一幸、樋口重和他33名, 建築設計資料集成-人間, 丸善出版, 2003.02.
Papers
1. Takafumi Maeda, Relationship between maximum oxygen uptake and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold environment, Journal of Physiological Anthropology, https://doi.org/10.1186/s40101-017-0158-2, 36, 42, 2017.12, Various individual characteristics affect environmental adaptability of a human. The present study evaluates the relationship between physical fitness and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold environment.
Seven healthy male students (aged 22.0 years) participated in this study. Cold exposure tests consisted of supine rest for 60 min at 28 °C followed by 90 min at 10 °C. Rectal and skin temperatures at seven sites, oxygen consumption, and the diameter of a finger vein were measured during the experiment. Metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction were calculated. Individual maximum oxygen consumption, a direct index of aerobic fitness, was measured on the day following the cold exposure test.
Decreases in temperature of the hand negatively correlated with the changes in rectal temperature. Maximum oxygen consumption and the rate of vasoconstriction are positively correlated. Furthermore, pairs of the following three factors are also significantly correlated: rate of metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction.
The results of this study suggested that the capacity for peripheral vasoconstriction can be improved by physical exercise. Furthermore, when exposed to a cold environment, fitter individuals could maintain metabolic heat production at the resting metabolic level of a thermoneutral condition, as they correspondingly lost less heat..
2. Takafumi Maeda, Tetsuhito Fukushima, Keita Ishibashi, Shigekazu Higuchi, Involvement of Basal Metabolic Rate in Determination of Type of Cold Tolerance, Journal of Physiological Anthropology, http://doi.org/10.2114/jpa2.26.415, 26, 3, 415-418, 2007.07, This study aimed to assess the relationship between basal metabolic rate (BMR) and metabolic heat production, and to clarify the involvement of BMR in determining the phenotype of cold tolerance. Measurements of BMR, maximum oxygen uptake, and cold exposure test were conducted on ten males. In the cold exposure test, rectal (Trec) and mean skin temperatures (Tms), oxygen uptake, and blood flow at forearm (BFarm) were measured during exposure to cold (10°C) for 90 min. Significant correlations were observed between BMR and increasing rate of oxygen uptake, as well as between decreasing rate of BFarm and increasing rate of oxygen uptake at the end of cold exposure. These findings suggested that individuals with a lower BMR were required to increase their metabolic heat production during cold exposure, and that those with a higher BMR were able to moderate increased metabolic heat production during cold exposure because they were able to reduce heat loss. This study showed that BMR is an important factor in determining the phenotype of cold tolerance, and that individuals with a low BMR showed calorigenic-type cold adaptation, whereas subjects with a high BMR exhibited adiabatic-type cold adaptation by peripheral vasoconstriction..
3. Takafumi Maeda, Mitsuhiro Ohta, Shin-Ya Kaneko, Hideyuki Kanda, Tetsuhito Fukushima, Relationships between heatstroke symptoms and lifestyles in Japanese forestry workers, Journal of the Human-Environment System, http://doi.org/10.1618/jhes.13.1, 13, 1, 1-6, 2011.07, Several risk factors for heatstroke among forestry workers were previously reported, but the effects of lifestyles of the workers on heatstroke symptoms remain unknown. This study examines the effects of lifestyles on heatstroke symptoms among Japanese forestry workers during the summer. We distributed a questionnaire to 97 forestry workers about heatstroke symptoms, hydration, hotness in workplace, lifestyles including food consumption, sleep duration, exercise, alcohol consumption, and smoking, age, and years of forestry service, and measured physical characteristics. The total health score was used as an index of healthy habits. Thirty-seven workers (38.1%) experienced heatstroke symptoms. Heatstroke and asymptomatic groups significantly differed in terms of age, years of forestry service, frequency and volume of hydration, frequency of urination, and perceived hotness. Logistic regression analysis selected the following key variables associated with the development of heatstroke symptoms: years of forestry service, frequency of hydration adjusted by frequency of urination, and total health score. In conclusion, the present study revealed that one third of forestry workers develop some early symptoms of heatstroke during work, and healthy habits reduce the risk of heatstroke in forestry workers..
4. Takafumi Maeda, Shin-Ya Kaneko, Mitsuhiro Ohta, Kazuko Tanaka, Akihiko Sasaki, Tetsuhito Fukushima, Risk factors for heatstroke in Japanese forestry workers, Journal of Occupational Health, http://doi.org/10.1539/joh.48.223, 48, 4, 223-229, 2006.08, We examined the risk factors for heatstroke among forestry workers in Japan during the summer. We distributed a questionnaire to 124 forestry workers to determine heatstroke symptoms, degree of sweating and hydration, as well as perceived hotness and amount of sunlight at work sites. Forty of the workers (32.3%) reported experiencing heatstroke symptoms. Thirteen and 21 of them reported such symptoms during July and August, respectively. Eleven workers experienced heatstroke at around 14:00; 5 and 4 developed symptoms at around 11:00 and 10:00, respectively. Groups with and without heatstroke symptoms significantly differed in terms of perceived hotness (p<0.05), sunlight (p<0.05), degree of sweating (p<0.01) and frequency of hydration (p<0.05) while working. Heatstroke symptoms developed in 60.6% of workers aged up to 50 yr, but in only 22.0% of those over the age of 51 (p<0.01). Multiple regression analysis selected the following key variables associated with the development of heatstroke symptoms (R2=0.236 and p=0.006): frequency of urination, hotness, BMI and years of forestry work (standard coefficients: +0.229, +0.194, +0.280 and -0.162, respectively). The results of the present study showed that one third of forestry workers developed some symptoms of early heatstroke during summer forestry work. Furthermore, the results indicate that a short duration of forestry service was one of the risk factors contributing to the onset of heatstroke, in addition to heat stress, loss of body water and electrolytes, and obesity..
5. Takafumi Maeda, Akiko Sugawara, Tetsuhito Fukushima, Shigekazu Higuchi, Keita Ishibashi, Effects of Lifestyle, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness on Cold Tolerance in Humans, Journal of Physiological Anthropology and Applied Human Science, http://doi.org/10.2114/jpa.24.439, 24, 4, 439-443, 2005.08, [URL], In the present study, we attempted to clarify the effects of lifestyle and body compositions on basal metabolism and to clarify the effects of physical training on thermoregulatory responses to cold. Basal metabolism, body compositions, and questionnaires regarding lifestyle were evaluated in 37 students. From multiple linear regression analysis, sex, muscle weight, fat intake, and diurnal temperature were selected as significant explanatory variables. In a second experiment, rectal and the skin temperature at 7 different points as well as the oxygen uptake of eight males were measured at 10°C for 90 min before and after training. The decline in rectal temperature that was observed before training was not observed after training. In addition, rectal temperature was significantly higher at post-training than at pre-training. These results suggest that some lifestyle factors affect cold tolerance; in particular, daily activity might improve our ability to control heat radiation and basal heat production..
6. Takafumi Maeda, Perspectives on Environmental Adaptability and Physiological Polymorphism in Thermoregulation, Journal of Physiological Anthropology and Applied Human Science, http://doi.org/10.2114/jpa.24.237, 24, 3, 237-240, 2005.06, [URL].
7. Takafumi Maeda, Akira Yasukouchi, Blood Lactate Disappearance during Breathing Hyperoxic Gas after Exercise in Two Different Physical Fitness Groups: on The Work Load Fixed at 70%VO2max, Applied Human Science, http://doi.org/10.2114/jpa.16.249, 16, 6, 249-256, 1997.10, The purpose of this study is to evaluate effects of breathing hyperoxic gas on blood lactate disappearance after submaximal exercise in two different physical fitness groups and to clarify the most effective oxygen concentration in each group. Fourteen healthy male students participated as subjects in this study. They were divided in two groups by difference in their anaerobic threshold (AT). Seven males were treated as Higher AT group and the others as Lower AT group. Subjects wore a T-shirt, short pants and sports shoes and performed three sessions; each consisting of five minutes of exercise and six minutes of rest, at a workload of 70% VO2max On a bicycle ergometer. Hyperoxic gas was breathed only during recovery periods. Oxygen rates of 21, 30, 40, 60, 80 and 100% in inspired gas were employed. According to the results of blood lactate (BLA), the most effective oxygen condition on BLA disappearance was obtained over 60% in Higher AT group and at 30% oxygen in Lower AT group. Thus, it was especially noteworthy that the effects of hyperoxic gas in Higher AT group were different from those of Lower AT group. It is thought that the effects of breathing hyperoxic gas were dependent on physical fitness, which have caused many reports to be in conflict hitherto..
8. Takafumi Maeda, Akira Yasukouchi, Blood Lactate Disappearance during Breathing Hyperoxic Gas after Exercise in Two Different Physical Fitness Groups: on The Work Load Fixed at 130%AT, Applied Human Science, http://doi.org/10.2114/jpa.17.33, 17, 2, 33-40, 1998.02, This study aimed to investigate the effects of hyperoxic gas breathing on the disappearance of blood lactate after exercise in two groups having different physical fitness and to determine the most effective O2 concentration in consideration of workload. Our previous study has demonstrated that hyperoxic gas breathing brought out different effects among subjects. In respect of these effects, it was thought necessary to pay attention to exercise intensity. Therefore, the exercise intensity of this study was set by using relative workload of anaerobic threshold (AT) from the aspect of blood lactate. Ten healthy male students participated as subjects and were divided into 2 groups; a group consisting of 5 active students whose mean AT was 60.4% VO2max (Higher AT group) and the other group consisting of 5 inactive students having the mean AT of 48.8% VO2max (Lower AT group). All subjects underwent three cycles of ergometer exercise on a bicycle (workload; 130% AT) for 5 min and recovery session for 6 min. The hyperoxic gas breathing was given only for the recovery session. The conditions of breathing were air, 30, 40, 60 or 80% O2. Blood for determination of the blood lactate level was taken only in the recovery session. When compared with air-breathing, the blood lactate level was significantly reduced in the condition of more than about 60% O2 breathing in Higher AT group, but not in Lower AT one. Together with the previous findings, it was found that the blood lactate level was markedly reduced by more than 60% O2 breathing in Higher AT group without relation to the workload in the range of about 70 to 80% VO2max. In Lower AT group, however, the effects of hyperoxic gas breathing were dependent on the exercise intensity; 30% and 40% O2 breathings were effective for the subjects with more than about 65% VO2max, but not in a lower intensity than it. These results indicate that the effects of hyperoxic gas breathing on the disappearance of blood lactate are dependent on the exercise intensity and the physical capacity..
Presentations
1. Linran Ruan, Nobuko Hashiguchi, Masanobu Hayashi, Hiroko Koga, Takashi Nonaka, Takafumi Maeda, Effects of bathing on psychophysiological responses in the elderly and the young males, The 17th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics, 2017.11, To many Japanese, taking a hot bath is an essential part of their daily life. However, there have been hot bath-related illness and deaths among the elderly populations, especially during winter. The purpose of this study was to clarify the variation in physiological and psychological responses of the elderly and the young males during and after taking a hot bath. Ten healthy old men (70.2±4.1 years old) and ten healthy young men (22.6±0.84 years old) participated in this experiment. They stayed in a sitting posture with sweat pants and bathrobe in the pre-room (air temperature:20°C relative humidity:50%) for 60 min. And then they took off the clothes and moved to the bathroom, subsequently stayed in the bathtub for 8 minutes. The water temperature was set at 40°C and 42°C on separate days for each participant. We measured blood pressure, heart rate, skin and rectal temperature, thermal sensation, and thermal comfort periodically before, during and after bathing. Systolic blood pressure(SBP) of the elderly significantly increased just after getting into hot water and significantly decreased during bathing. However, SBP of the young did not change. In addition, SBP of the elderly decreased further in the standing position soon after getting out of the bathtub but immediately increased by changing into sitting posture. Besides, heart rates (HR) of the elderly were not changed by bathing, but that of the young were significantly increased during bathing at 42°C. HR were increased by standing and decreased by sitting in both age groups, and the change in HR of the young was wider than the elderly. The results suggested that the weakened cardiovascular functions such as heart pump ability, blood vessel flexibility, and baroreflex sensitivity of the elderly might induce the large change in blood pressure and small change in heart rate, resulting in higher risk of accidents for the
elderly to take a hot bath during winter..
2. Takafumi Maeda, Relationship between endothelium-dependent vasodilation and cold-induced vasodilation, The 17th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics, 2017.11.
3. Etika Vidyarini, Takafumi Maeda, Effect of transient changes of air temperature on subjective response of office worker in tropical country. Case study: Jakarta, Indonesia., International Conference of Occupational Health and Safety 2017 "Occupational Health and Safety Trends and Challenges in Developing Countries", 2017.11.
4. Takafumi Maeda, Ryo Takahashi, Effects of indoor air temperature and local thermal stimuli on mental task performance., International Conference of Occupational Health and Safety 2017 "Occupational Health and Safety Trends and Challenges in Developing Countries", 2017.11, Individual heating and cooling system are required at office where many various persons are staying to their work, because there are large individual differences in the comfortable range of air temperature. Local heating and cooling by contact are used for individual air conditioning in offices and heating and cooling of electric vehicles. Although it was reported the effect of local heating/cooling by contact on thermoregulation and subjective votes, it is unknown the effect of local heating/cooling by contact on mental work performance. The purposes of the present study were to clarify the effects of indoor air temperature and local heating in cold and local cooling in hot on the mental task performance and psychophysiological responses.
In the experiment 1, eight healthy male subjects stayed in climatic chamber for 40 minutes, which set air temperature conditions (16, 21, 26, 31, or 36 °C) and moderate relative humidity (50%RH) following 26 °C and 50%RH in a pre-room for 30 minutes. Subjects performed calculation task for 5 min four times during experimental room. Physiological measurements were skin temperatures, skin blood flow, and blood pressure. Subjective votes such as thermal sensation, thermal comfort, and arousal level were also measured using the visual analog scale. In local cooling test (experiment 2), five males were sitting rest for 50 min in 25 and 35°C, and then they were locality cooled at neck or lower legs by cold gel pack for 20 min. In local heating test (experiment 3), eight males were sitting rest for 50 min in 16, 21, 26°C, and then they were locality warmed at abdomen by heating system for 40 min.
There was an inverse U-shape relationship between air temperature and mental work performance. And the highest performance was observed at slightly cool conditions which were 21 and 26°C in experiment 1. Mental task performance were improved by both neck and lower leg cooling in a hot environment (experiment 2) and by abdomen heating in a cold environment (experiment 3). Peripheral vasodilation in a hot was suppressed by local cooling and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold was improved by local heating. These results suggested that local cooling in a hot and local heating in a cold induced the increment of cerebral blood supply during mental task, resulting in the improvement of mental task performance..
5. Takafumi Maeda, Effects of seasonal change in basal metabolic rate on the seasonal difference in cold-induced thermogenesis., 2017 Symposium of the Society for the Study of Human Biology & International Association of Physiological Anthropology "Human Biology of Climate Change", 2017.09.
6. Takafumi Maeda, Ryota Takayashiki, Relative humidity and secretory immunoglobulin A, The 1st APACPH Bangkok Region Conference and The 8th International Public Health Conference, 2017.05, Background/Objectives: Infection disease are more prevalent in winter than in summer due to the low humidity condition. However, it was not clear that the relationship relative humidity and secretory immunoglobulin A. The purposes of this study were to clarify the effect of relative humidity on secretory immunoglobulin A.
Methods: Eight healthy male subjects stayed in a climatic chamber for 180 minutes, which set moderate air temperature (25 °C) and three humidity conditions (30, 60, and 90%RH). Saliva samples were collected using the sterilized tube and straw at 0, 90, and 180 min. Secretory immunoglobulin A concentration in saliva samples were determined using the ELISA kits.
Results: It found that secretory immunoglobulin A levels was significantly decreased in 30%RH, significantly increased in 60%RH, and not change in 90%RH during exposure for 180 minutes, and secretory immunoglobulin A level at 180-min during exposure were significantly higher in 60 and 90%RH than in 30%RH condition.
Conclusions: The present study revealed that secretory immunoglobulin A levels decreased in the low relative humidity in the winter season, and increased by humidification in moderate relative humidity. These results suggested that oral immunity function was improved by humidification in winter..
7. Takafumi Maeda, Ryota Takayashiki, Effects of relative humidity on secretory immunoglobulin A and cortisol in saliva., The Fifth International Conference on Human–Environment System, 2016.11.
8. Takafumi Maeda, Masanobu Hayashi, Individual Variation in Thermogenesis during Cold Exposure, 20th Congress of the European Anthropological Association, 2016.08.
9. Takafumi Maeda, Cold Adaptability in Human, Immune Function and Environmental Condition, Thermal Stimuli and Mental Task Performance, Research Seminar of NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism in Maastricht University, 2016.01.
10. Takafumi Maeda, Phenotype of Cold-Induced Thermogenic Resposes, The 12th International Congress of Physiological Anthropology, 2015.10.
11. Koji Kobayashi, Takafumi Maeda, Takeshi Yoneshiro, Mami Matsushita, Masayuki Saito, Relationship between Brown Adipose Tissue Activity and Subcutaneous Tissue Temperature of Supraclavicular Region during Mild Cold Exposure, The 12th International Congress of Physiological Anthropology, 2015.10.
12. Takafumi Maeda, Shoichi Takano, Koji Kobayashi, Effect of Seasonal Variation in Basal Metabolic Rate on Cold-Induced Thermogenesis, International Symposium on Human Adaptation to Environment and Whole-body Coordination, 2015.03.
13. Aritoshi IIDA, Takafumi MAEDA, Shintaro YOKOYAMA, Masashi KURAMAE, Peripheral circulatory responses to oppression, The 4th International Conference of Human-Environment System, 2011.10.
14. Yasuaki OKADA, Takafumi MAEDA, Hiroshi ISHIBASHI, Shinya MORIOKA, Shintaro YOKOYAMA, Masashi, KURAMAE, Relationship between vascular function and thermoregulatory responses to heat and cold exposure; effect of aerobic training, The 4th International Conference of Human-Environment System, 2011.10.
15. Shinya MORIOKA, Takafumi MAEDA, Yasuaki OKADA, Hiroshi ISHIBASHI, Suguru HIROTA, Masashi KURAMAE, Shintaro YOKOYAMA, The relationships between second derivative plenthysmography on thermoregulatory responses to heat stress., The 4th International Conference of Human-Environment System, 2011.10.
16. Takafumi MAEDA, Suguru HIROTA, Hiroshi ISHIBASHI, Yasuaki OKADA, Shintaro YOKOYAMA, Masashi KURAMAE, Disappearance of seasonal variation in the basal metabolic rate in Japanese males, The 10th International Congress of Physiological Anthropology, 2010.09.
17. Takafumi MAEDA, Tetsuhito Fukushima, Masashi KURAMAE, Shintaro YOKOYAMA, Relationship between Vascular Function and Vasoconstrictive Response to Cold, The 13th International Conference of Environmental Ergonomics, 2009.08.
Membership in Academic Society
  • Japan Society of Physiological Anthropology
  • Japan Ergonomics Society
  • Japanese Society of Human-Environment System
  • Japanese Society of Biometeorology
  • Japan Society for Occupational Health
  • Japanese Society of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine
  • Japanese Society for Hygiene