Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Reports
HIDEMICHI FUJII Last modified date:2019.09.12

Associate Professor / Department of International Economy and Business / Faculty of Economics


Reports
1. Hidemichi Fujii, Shunsuke Managi, Trends and Priority Shifts in Artificial Intelligence Technology Invention: A global patent analysis, RIETI Discussion Paper Series, 2017.05, [URL], Artificial intelligence (AI) technology can play a critical role in economic development, resource conservation, and environmental protection by increasing efficiency. This study is the first to apply a decomposition framework to clarify the determinants of AI technology invention. Exploiting data from the World Intellectual Property Organization, this study clarifies the determining factors that contribute to AI technology patent publications based on technology type. Consisting of 13,567 AI technology patents for the 2000-2016 period, our worldwide dataset includes patent publication data from the United States, Japan, China, Europe, and the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). We find that priority has shifted from biological- and knowledge-based models to specific mathematical models and other AI technologies, particularly in the United States and Japan. Our technology type and country comparison shows that the characteristics of AI technology patent publication differ among companies and countries..
2. Nick Johnstone, Shunsuke Managi, Miguel Cárdenas Rodríguez, Ivan Haščič, Hidemichi Fujii and Martin Souchier, Environmental policy design, innovation and efficiency gains in electricity generation, OECD, 10.1787/5jm0t716kwmw-en, 2016.04, [URL], This paper explores the relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and competitiveness, drawing upon a unique dataset on environmental regulations directed at combustion plants, a global dataset of power plants, and a global dataset of ‘environmental’ patents. The analysis is conducted in two stages. First, a nonparametric frontier analysis is implemented to estimate efficiency scores, including a measure of technological innovation based on patent stocks. Second, econometric methods are applied to analyse the role of policy stringency and policy design on efficiency. Our estimation sample covers thermal power plant sectors in 20 countries from 1990 to 2009. The results show that the stringency of environmental regulations is a significant determinant of productive efficiency with respect to pollutant emissions as well as fuel use. However, these effects turn negative once the level of stringency leaps over a certain threshold. In addition, the paper concludes that the positive effect of regulatory stringency can be diminished by a negative effect of regulatory differentiation with measures which are differentiated across plant size and age having negative consequences, and these effects are increasing over time. This finding is important given the prevalence of size- and vintage-differentiated policies in many countries. Finally, it is found that integrated approaches to environmental innovation are more likely to bring about efficiency improvements than end-of-pipe technologies..