Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Papers
Susumu Yokota Last modified date:2021.06.04

Associate Professor / Division for Experimental Natural Science / Faculty of Arts and Science


Papers
1. Hashimoto T, Higuchi H, Uno A, Yokota S, Asano K, Taki Y, Kawashima R, Association between resting-state functional connectivity and reading in two writing systems in Japanese children with and without developmental dyslexia, Brain Connectivity, 10, 245-266, 2020.08.
2. Hashimoto T, Yokota S, Matsuzaki Y, Kawashima R, Intrinsic hippocampal functional connectivity underlying rigid memory in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: A case–control study, Autism, doi: 10.1177/13623613211004058, 2021.01.
3. Susumu Yokota, Mari Tanaka, The cognitive function of deception in children with autism spectrum disorder, Journal of special education research, 9, 1, 1-9, 2020.08.
4. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Yuko Sassa, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Daniele Magistro, Ryuta Kawashima, Originality of divergent thinking is associated with working memory–related brain activity
Evidence from a large sample study: Originality and brain activity, NeuroImage, 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116825, 216, 2020.08, The originality of creativity measured by divergent thinking (CMDT) is a unique variable that is positively correlated with psychometric intelligence and other psychological measures. Here, we aimed to determine the associations of CMDT originality/fluency scores and brain activity associated with working memory (WM) and simple cognitive processes during the N-back paradigm in a cohort of 1221 young adults. We observed that originality/fluency scores were associated with greater brain activity during the 0-back simple cognitive task and 2-back WM task in key nodes of the ventral attention system in the right hemisphere. Further, subjects with higher originality/fluency scores showed lower task-induced deactivations in areas of the default mode network, especially during the 2-back task. Psychological analyses revealed the associations of originality/fluency scores with both psychometric intelligence and systemizing. We also observed the effects of interaction between sex and originality/fluency scores on functional activity during the 0-back task in posterior parts of the default mode network together with other areas as well as simple processing speed. These results indicate that the originality of CMDT is associated with (a) greater activation of the ventral attention system, which is involved in reorienting attention and (b) reduced task-induced deactivation of the default mode network, which is indicative of alterations in attentional reallocation, and (c) cognitive correlates of originality of CMDT and revealed sex differences in these associations..
5. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Izumi Matsudaira, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Kelssy H. Kelssy, Rui Nouchi, Kohei Sakaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Takayuki Nozawa, Susumu Yokota, Tsuyoshi Araki, Sugiko Hanawa, Ryo Ishibashi, Shohei Yamazaki, Ryuta Kawashima, Convergent creative thinking performance is associated with white matter structures
Evidence from a large sample study, NeuroImage, 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116577, 210, 2020.04, In laboratory settings, creativity is measured using tasks of divergent as well as convergent thinking. It has been suggested that brain connectivity is important for creativity. In the present study, we investigated the associations of convergent thinking performance of compound Remote Associates Test (CRAT) with fractional anisotropy (FA) in diffusion tensor imaging and regional white matter (WM) volume (rWMV) in voxel-based morphometry in a large sample of healthy young adults (360 males and 280 females; mean age: 20.9 years, SD ​= ​1.6). We showed that CRAT performance was positively correlated with WM pathway property (i.e., FA) in the left fronto-occipital fasciculus and the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which play important roles in processing of language and concept. Further, CRAT performance was negatively correlated with rWMV in the widespread frontal temporal subcortical and cerebellar WM areas, suggesting the unique association of convergent thinking with WM connectivity..
6. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Yuko Sassa, Ryuta Kawashima, Association of iron levels in hair with brain structures and functions in young adults, Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 10.1016/j.jtemb.2019.126436, 58, 2020.03, Background: Iron plays a critical role in normal brain functions and development, but it has also been known to have adverse neurological effects. Methods: Here, we investigated the associations of iron levels in hair with regional gray matter volume (rGMV), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and cognitive differences in a study cohort of 590 healthy young adults. Results: Our findings showed that high iron levels were associated with lower rGMV in areas including the hippocampus, lower rCBF in the anterior and posterior parts of the brain, greater FA in areas including the part of the splenium of the corpus callosum, lower MD in the overlapping area including the splenium of the corpus callosum, as well as greater MD in the left hippocampus and areas including the frontal lobe. Conclusion: These results are compatible with the notion that iron plays diverse roles in neural mechanisms in healthy young adults..
7. Akiko Kobayashi, Susumu Yokota, Hikaru Takeuchi, Kohei Asano, Michiko Asano, Yuko Sassa, Yasuyuki Taki, Ryuta Kawashima, Increased grey matter volume of the right superior temporal gyrus in healthy children with autistic cognitive style
A VBM study, Brain and Cognition, 10.1016/j.bandc.2019.105514, 139, 2020.03, The empathizing–systemizing model describes human cognitive style using empathizing (the drive to identify another's mental state and respond appropriately) and systemizing (the drive to assess or construct rule-based systems). ‘Brain type’ was envisioned to explain individual differences in cognitive style based on the discrepancy of the two drives. In this model, individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a neurodevelopmental disorder, have extremely stronger systemizing. Revealing the underlying mechanisms of individual differences in cognitive style might contribute to elucidation of the pathology of ASD. We used voxel-based morphometry to compare the brain structures among the brain types (those who have stronger empathizing, those who have equally stronger drive to both, and those who have stronger systemizing) in 207 healthy children (age range: 5–15). Results showed that children with stronger systemizing had significantly greater grey matter volume of the right superior temporal gyrus (rSTG) than the others. The brain region, a distinctive brain structure of those with stronger systemizing, was overlapped with that of children with ASD. The rSTG is involved in detailed perceptual processing in social cognition, which is partially related to stronger systemizing. Our results contribute to elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of individual differences in cognitive style..
8. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Yuko Sassa, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Ryuta Kawashima, Empathizing associates with mean diffusivity, Scientific reports, 10.1038/s41598-019-45106-1, 9, 1, 2019.12, Empathizing is defined as “the drive to identify another’s mental states and to respond to these with an appropriate emotion” and systemizing is defined as “the drive to the drive to analyze and construct rule-based systems”. While mean diffusivity (MD) has been robustly associated with several cognitive traits and disorders related with empathizing and systemizing, its direct correlation with empathizing and systemizing remains to be investigated. We undertook voxel-by-voxel investigations of regional MD to discover microstructural correlates of empathizing, systemizing, and the discrepancy between them (D score: systemizing − empathizing). Whole-brain analyses of covariance revealed that across both sexes, empathizing was positively correlated with MD of (a) an anatomical cluster that primarily spreads in the areas in and adjacent to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left anterior to the middle cingulate cortex, and left insula and (b) an anatomical cluster of the left postcentral gyrus and left rolandic operculum. The former overlaps with positive MD correlates of cooperativeness. The D score and systemizing did not show significant correlations. In conclusion, while increased MD has generally been associated with reduced neural tissues and possibly area function, higher empathizing and cooperativeness were commonly reflected by greater MD values in areas (a) that mainly overlap with areas that play a key role in emotional salience and empathy. In addition, higher empathizing was correlated with greater MD values in areas (b) that play a key role in the mirror neuron system..
9. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Yuko Sassa, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Ryuta Kawashima, Mean diffusivity associated with trait emotional intelligence, Social cognitive and affective neuroscience, 10.1093/scan/nsz059, 14, 8, 871-883, 2019.09, Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the neural bases of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) lie in the social cognition network (SCN) and the somatic marker circuitry (SMC). The current study was the first to investigate the associations of total TEI factors and subfactors with mean diffusivity (MD) of these networks as well as regional MD of the dopaminergic system (MDDS). We found that TEI intrapersonal factor score and total TEI score were negatively correlated with regional MDDS in the vicinity of the right putamen and right pallidum and that TEI intrapersonal factor score was negatively correlated with MD values of the fusiform gyrus. Total TEI score and TEI factor scores were positively correlated with MD values of various areas within or adjacent to SCN components, SMC structures and the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC). Our MD findings demonstrated the importance of the dopaminergic system to TEI and implicate the SCN, SMC and LPFC in TEI. Future studies are required to investigate the implications of positive and negative associations with MD values..
10. Hikaru Takeuchi, Hiroaki Tomita, Yasuyuki Taki, Yoshie Kikuchi, Chiaki Ono, Zhiqian Yu, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Daniele Magistro, Yuko Sassa, Ryuta Kawashima, A Common CACNA1C Gene Risk Variant has Sex-Dependent Effects on Behavioral Traits and Brain Functional Activity, Cerebral Cortex, 10.1093/cercor/bhy189, 29, 8, 3211-3219, 2019.08, Genome-wide association studies have suggested that allelic variations in the CACNA1C gene confer susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder only in women. Here we investigated the sex-specific effects of the CACNA1C variant rs1024582 on psychiatry-related traits, brain activity during tasks and rest, and brain volume in 1207 normal male and female subjects. After correcting for multiple comparisons, there were significant interaction effects between sex and the minor allele of this polymorphism on the hostile behavior subscale scores of the Coronary-Prone Type Scale mediated by higher scores in female carriers of the minor allele. Imaging analyses revealed significant interaction effects between sex and the minor allele on fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and on brain activity during the 2-back task in areas of the right posterior cingulate cortex, right thalamus, and right hippocampus, which were all mediated by reduced activity in female carriers of the minor allele. Our results demonstrated that the rs1024582 risk variant of CACNA1C is associated with reduced activity in the frontolimbic regions at rest and during a working memory task as well as with greater hostility in females in the healthy population..
11. Shigeyuki Ikeda, Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Susumu Yokota, Daniele Magistro, Ryuta Kawashima, Neural substrates of self- and external-preoccupation
A voxel-based morphometry study, Brain and Behavior, 10.1002/brb3.1267, 9, 6, 2019.06, Introduction: Self- and external-preoccupation have been linked to psychopathological states. The neural substrates underlying self- and external-preoccupation remain unclear. In the present study, we aim to provide insight into the information-processing mechanisms associated with self- and external-preoccupation at the structural level. Methods: To investigate the neural substrates of self- and external-preoccupation, we acquired high-resolution T1-weighted structural images and Preoccupation Scale scores from 1,122 young subjects. Associations between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and Preoccupation Scale subscores for self- and external-preoccupation were estimated using voxel-based morphometry. Results: Significant positive associations between self-preoccupation and rGMV were observed in widespread brain areas such as the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate gyri, structures known to be associated with self-triggered self-reference during rest. Significant negative associations between external-preoccupation and rGMV were observed only in the bilateral cerebellum, regions known to be associated with behavioral addiction, sustained attention, and reward system. Conclusion: Our results reveal distinct neural substrates for self- and external-preoccupation at the structural level..
12. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Yuko Sassa, Ryuta Kawashima, Association of copper levels in the hair with gray matter volume, mean diffusivity, and cognitive functions, Brain Structure and Function, 10.1007/s00429-019-01830-y, 224, 3, 1203-1217, 2019.04, Although copper plays a critical role in normal brain functions and development, it is known that excess copper causes toxicity. Here we investigated the associations of copper levels in the hair with regional gray matter volume (rGMV), mean diffusivity (MD), and cognitive differences in a study cohort of 924 healthy young adults. Our findings showed that high copper levels were associated mostly with low cognitive abilities (low scores on the intelligence test consisting of complex speed tasks, involving reasoning task, a complex arithmetic task, and a reading comprehension task) as well as lower reverse Stroop interference, high rGMV over widespread areas of the brain [mainly including the bilateral lateral and medial parietal cortices, medial temporal structures (amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampal gyrus), middle cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, insula, perisylvian areas, inferior temporal lobe, temporal pole, occipital lobes, and supplementary motor area], as well as high MD of the right substantia nigra and bilateral hippocampus, which are indicative of low density in brain tissues. These results suggest that copper levels are associated with mostly aberrant cognitive functions, greater rGMV in extensive areas, greater MD (which are indicative of low density in brain tissues) in subcortical structures in the healthy young adults, possibly reflecting copper’s complex roles in neural mechanisms..
13. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Yuko Sassa, Ryuta Kawashima, Allergic tendencies are associated with larger gray matter volumes, Scientific reports, 10.1038/s41598-018-21985-8, 8, 1, 2018.12, Allergic tendencies are associated with important cognitive and physiological factors, such as intelligence and mathematical abilities. Allergies are widely prevalent, especially in modern life, and the reason for its association with important cognitive variables is an intriguing scientific question. However, despite the unique characteristics of cognitive correlates of allergy, the anatomical correlates of allergy remain unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the associations between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and allergic tendencies in young adults. In a study cohort of 1,219 healthy, educated young adults, we identified a positive correlation between total allergic tendency and rGMV in large anatomical clusters that mainly encompassed the dorsal part of the cerebral neocortex, right anterior insula, and cerebellum. Furthermore, both mean rGMV of the entire part of these clusters and total allergenic tendency showed a significant positive correlation with spatial ability. These results suggest the link among allergic tendencies, larger rGMV, and the better spatial ability in healthy, educated young adults..
14. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Yuko Sassa, Takayuki Nozawa, Shigeyuki Ikeda, Susumu Yokota, Magistro Daniele, Ryuta Kawashima, General intelligence is associated with working memory-related brain activity
new evidence from a large sample study, Brain Structure and Function, 10.1007/s00429-018-1747-5, 223, 9, 4243-4258, 2018.12, Psychometric intelligence is closely related to working memory capacity. Here we aim to determine the associations of neural activation patterns during the N-back working memory paradigm with psychometric intelligence and working memory performance. We solved the statistical problems of previous studies using (1) a large cohort of 1235 young adults and (2) robust voxel-by-voxel permutation-based statistics at the whole-brain level. Many of the significant correlations were weak, and our findings were not consistent with those of previous studies. We observed that many of the significant correlations involved brain areas in the periphery or boundaries between the task-positive network (TPN) and task-negative network (TNN), suggesting that the expansion of the TPN or TNN is associated with greater cognitive ability. Lower activity in TPN and less task-induced deactivation (TID) in TNN were associated with greater cognitive ability. These findings indicate that subjects with greater cognitive ability have a lower brain response to task demand, consistent with the notion that TID in TNN reflects cognitive demand but partly inconsistent with the prevailing neural efficiency theory. One exception was the pre-supplementary motor area, which plays a key role in cognitive control and sequential processing. In this area, intelligent subjects demonstrated greater activity related to working memory, suggesting that the pre-supplementary motor area plays a unique role in the execution of working memory tasks in intelligent subjects..
15. Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Kohei Asano, Michiko Asano, Yuko Sassa, Susumu Yokota, Yuka Kotozaki, Rui Nouchi, Ryuta Kawashima, Impact of frequency of internet use on development of brain structures and verbal intelligence
Longitudinal analyses, Human Brain Mapping, 10.1002/hbm.24286, 39, 11, 4471-4479, 2018.11, Excessive internet use is shown to be cross sectionally associated with lower cognitive functioning and reduced volume of several brain areas. However, the effects of daily internet use on the development of verbal intelligence and brain structures have not been investigated. Here, we cross sectionally examined the effects of the frequency of internet use on regional gray/white matter volume (rGMV/rWMV) and verbal intelligence as well as their longitudinal changes after 3.0 ± 0.3 (standard deviation) years in a large sample of children recruited from the general population (mean age, 11.2 ± 3.1 years; range, 5.7–18.4 years). Although there were no significant associations in cross sectional analyses, a higher frequency of internet use was found to be associated with decrease of verbal intelligence and smaller increase in rGMV and rWMV of widespread brain areas after a few years in longitudinal analyses. These areas involve areas related to language processing, attention and executive functions, emotion, and reward. In conclusion, frequent internet use is directly or indirectly associated with decrease of verbal intelligence and development to smaller gray matter volume at later stages..
16. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Shinada T, Sakaki K, Sassa Y, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Daniele M, Kawashima R, Refractive error is associated with intracranial volume, Scientific Reports, 10.1038/s41598-017-18669-0, 8, 2018.01.
17. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Shinada T, Sakaki K, Sassa Y, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Daniele M, Kawashima R, Global associations between regional gray matter volume and diverse complex cognitive functions: evidence from a large sample study, Scientific Reports, 10.1038/s41598-017-10104-8, 7, 1, 2017.08.
18. Shigeyuki Ikeda, Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Rui Nouchi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yuka Kotozaki, Seishu Nakagawa, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Kunio Iizuka, Yuki Yamamoto, Sugiko Hanawa, Tsuyoshi Araki, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Kohei Sakaki, Takayuki Nozawa, Susumu Yokota, Daniele Magistro, Ryuta Kawashima, A comprehensive analysis of the correlations between resting-state oscillations in multiple-frequency bands and big five traits, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00321, 11, 2017.06, Recently, the association between human personality traits and resting-state brain activity has gained interest in neuroimaging studies. However, it remains unclear if Big Five personality traits are represented in frequency bands (∼0.25 Hz) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity. Based on earlier neurophysiological studies, we investigated the correlation between the five personality traits assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) at four distinct frequency bands (slow-5 (0.01–0.027 Hz), slow-4 (0.027–0.073 Hz), slow-3 (0.073–0.198 Hz) and slow-2 (0.198–0.25 Hz)). We enrolled 835 young subjects and calculated the correlations of resting-state fMRI signals using a multiple regression analysis. We found a significant and consistent correlation between fALFF and the personality trait of extraversion at all frequency bands. Furthermore, significant correlations were detected in distinct brain regions for each frequency band. This finding supports the frequency-specific spatial representations of personality traits as previously suggested. In conclusion, our data highlight an association between human personality traits and fALFF at four distinct frequency bands..
19. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Shinada T, Sakaki K, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Magistro D, Sassa Y, Kawashima R, Regional homogeneity, resting-state functional connectivity and amplitude of low frequency fluctuation associated with creativity measured by divergent thinking in a sex-specific manner., Neuroimage, 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.02.079, 152, 258-269, 2017.05.
20. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Shinada T, Sakaki K, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Daniele M, Sassa Y, Kawasima R, Shorter sleep duration and better sleep quality are associated with greater tissue density in the brain, Scientific Reports, 10.1038/s41598-018-24226-0, 8, 2017.04.
21. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Shinada T, Sakaki K, Sassa Y, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Daniele M, Kawashima R, Creative females have larger white matter structures: evidence from a large sample study, Human Brain Mapping, 10.1002/hbm.23369, 38, 1, 414-430, 2017.01.
22. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Yokota S, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, Impact of videogame play on the brain’s microstructural properties: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, Molecular Psychiatry, 10.1038/mp.2015.193, 21, 12, 1781-1789, 2016.12.
23. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Yokota S, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, Impact of reading habit on white matter structure: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, Neuroimage, 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.03.037, 133, 378-389, 2016.06.
24. Matsudaira I*, Yokota S*, Hashimoto T, Takeuchi H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Taki Y, Kawashima R, Parental praise correlates with posterior insular cortex gray matter volume in children and adolescents, Plos One, 10.1371/journal.pone.0154220, 2016.04.
25. Hashimoto T, Fukui K, Takeuchi H, Yokota S, Kikuchi Y, Tomita H, Taki Y, Kawashima R, Effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on gray matter volume in typically developing children and adolescents, Cerebral Cortex, 10.1093/cercor/bhw020, 26, 4, 1795-1803, 2016.01.
26. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Yokota S, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, The impact of television viewing on brain structures: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, Cerebral Cortex, 10.1093/cercor/bht315, 25, 5, 1188-1197, 2015.05.
27. Yokota S, Takeuchi H, Hashimoto T, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Taki Y, Kawashima R, Individual differences in cognitive performance and brain structure in typically developing children, Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 10.1016/j.dcn.2015.05.003, 14, 1-7, 2015.05.
28. Yokota S, Taki Y, Hashizume H, Sassa Y, Thyreau B, Tanaka M, Kawashima R, Neural correlates of deception in social contexts in normally developing children, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00206, 2013.05.
29. Yokota S, Tanaka M, The development of deceptive behavior in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Journal of Special Education Research, 10.6033/specialeducation.2.1, 2, 1, 1-9, 2013.04.
30. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Yokota S, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, The impact of parent–child interaction on brain structures: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, Journal of Neuroscience, 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0598-14.2015, 35, 5, 2233-2245, 2015.02.
31. Hashimoto T, Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Yokota S, Hashizume H, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, Increased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study, Developmental Neuroscience, 10.1159/000370064, 37, 153-160, 2015.04.
32. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Asano K, Asano M, Sassa Y, Yokota S, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Kawashima R, Impact of frequency of internet use on development of brain structures and verbal intelligence: longitudinal analyses, Human Brain Mapping, 2018.01.
33. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Sekiguchi A, Iizuka K, Yamamoto Y, Hanawa S, Araki T, Miyauchi CM, Sakaki K, Nozawa T, Ikeda S, Yokota S, Daniele M, Sassa Y, Kawashima R, Allergic tendencies are associated with larger gray matter volumes, Scientific Reports, 2018.02.
34. Susumu Yokota, Yasuyuki Taki, Hiroshi Hashizume, Yuko Sassa, Benjamin Thyreau, Mari Tanaka, Ryuta Kawashima, Neural correlates of deception in social context in normally developing children, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2013.01.