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Doi Hiroyoshi Last modified date:2021.12.22





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Homepage
https://kyushu-u.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/hiroyoshi-doi
 Reseacher Profiling Tool Kyushu University Pure
Phone
092-642-5714
Fax
092-642-5722
Academic Degree
Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University
Country of degree conferring institution (Overseas)
No
Field of Specialization
Anesthesiology
ORCID(Open Researcher and Contributor ID)
0000-0002-8910-2980
Total Priod of education and research career in the foreign country
00years00months
Research
Research Interests
  • Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive decline at adult stage induced by neonatal exposure to midazolam and development of a therapeutic strategy
    keyword : early-life exposure to anesthesia , delayed neurocognitive impairment
    2021.05~2021.05.
Academic Activities
Papers
1. Hiroyoshi Doi, Taito Matsuda, Atsuhiko Sakai, Shuzo Matsubara, Sumio Hoka, Ken Yamaura, Kinichi Nakashima, Early-life midazolam exposure persistently changes chromatin accessibility to impair adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 10.1073/pnas.2107596118, 118, 38, 2021.09, Linkage between early-life exposure to anesthesia and subsequent learning disabilities is of great concern to children and their families. Here we show that early-life exposure to midazolam (MDZ), a widely used drug in pediatric anesthesia, persistently alters chromatin accessibility and the expression of quiescence-associated genes in neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mouse hippocampus. The alterations led to a sustained restriction of NSC proliferation toward adulthood, resulting in a reduction of neurogenesis that was associated with the impairment of hippocampal-dependent memory functions. Moreover, we found that voluntary exercise restored hippocampal neurogenesis, normalized the MDZ-perturbed transcriptome, and ameliorated cognitive ability in MDZ-exposed mice. Our findings thus explain how pediatric anesthesia provokes long-term adverse effects on brain function and provide a possible therapeutic strategy for countering them..