Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
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OZAWA Eiji Last modified date:2021.04.06

Associate Professor / Clinical Psychology
Department of Human Sciences
Faculty of Human-Environment Studies


Graduate School
Undergraduate School
Other Organization


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Homepage
https://kyushu-u.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/eiji-ozawa
 Reseacher Profiling Tool Kyushu University Pure
Academic Degree
Ph.D.
Field of Specialization
Clinical Psychology
Research
Research Interests
  • Research of psychological treatment for children in care
    keyword : children in care, children's home, maltreatment
    2015.04~2027.04.
  • Research for clinical Dohsa-hou for adolescent students
    keyword : adolescence, clinical Dohsa-hou
    2007.04~2015.04.
  • Development of group psychotherapy programs for children with developmental difficulties
    keyword : children with developmental difficulties, group psychotherapy
    2007.04~2015.03.
  • Development of body sense and clinical care of children and youth
    keyword : body sense, developmental change
    2010.04~2012.03.
  • Development of controllabirity to negative emotions and clinical care during adolescence
    keyword : adolescence, negative emotion, stress
    2008.04~2010.03.
Academic Activities
Papers
1. Kayo Takahashi,Eiji Ozawa,Susumu Harizuka, Impact of corporal punishment on victims’ future violent behavior in extracurricular sports, Heliyon, 10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04903, 6, 9, e04903, 2020.09.
2. Eiji Ozawa,Yutaro Hirata, High School Dropout Rates of Japanese Youth in Residential Care: An Examination of Major Risk Factors, Behavioral Sciences, 10.3390/bs10010019, 10, 1, 2020.01, Youths in Japanese residential care institutions often face challenges with social adaptation and career trajectories. This study aimed to examine the risk factors that lead residential care youths in Japan to drop out of high school. Eighty-nine residential care facilities completed a questionnaire that focused on the characteristics of residing high school students, their educational status, experiences of maltreatment before residence, diagnosed disabilities, and the timing of admission. A sample composed of 773 youths was analyzed. Among the facilities, the high school dropout rate among youths in residential care was 19.3% (n = 149). Data revealed that the time of admission had the utmost significant effect. The risk of dropping out for youths admitted at junior high school age was significantly higher than for youths admitted before that age. Overall, residential care youths had a higher risk of not adapting to high school, and youths receiving short-term care demonstrated difficulty continuing high school. These results illustrate the importance of psychological treatment and educational support for youth who enter residential care during adolescence. Hence, attention should be focused on improving youth engagement in school to improve their social and career outcomes..