Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
Researcher information (To researchers) Need Help? How to update
Shinri OHTA Last modified date:2020.02.07



Graduate School
Undergraduate School
Other Organization


Homepage
https://researchmap.jp/shinriohta/
Academic Degree
PhD in Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences
Country of degree conferring institution (Overseas)
No
Field of Specialization
Psycholinguistics, Neuroscience of language
ORCID(Open Researcher and Contributor ID)
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3240-0028
Total Priod of education and research career in the foreign country
01years02months
Outline Activities
I have been studying the neural bases of language by using various neuroimaging methods, such as electroencephalography, fMRI, etc.
Research
Research Interests
  • Using neuroimaging methods, such as electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, I have been studying the neural basis of morphosyntax. The ultimate goal of my research is to construct a model of syntactic computation in the human brain, which integrates linguistic theories and neuroscientific experiments.
    keyword : Neuroscience of Language, Neurolinguistics, Psycholinguistics
    2016.10.
Current and Past Project
  • Elucidation of the neural basis of language through integration of theory, models, and experiments
  • Theoretical Frameworks for Studying the Origins and Evolution of Human Language
Academic Activities
Reports
1. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Computational principles of syntax in the regions specialized for language: Integrating theoretical linguistics and functional neuroimaging, Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00204, 2013.12, [URL].
Papers
1. Kyohei Tanaka, Isso Nakamura, Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Mihoko Zushi, Hiroki Narita, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Merge-generability as the key concept of human language: Evidence from neuroscience, Frontiers in Psychology, https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02673, 10, 2673, 2019.11, [URL].
2. Takahiro Osada, Shinri Ohta, Akitoshi Ogawa, Masaki Tanaka, Akimitsu Suda, Koji Kamagata, Masaaki Hori, Shigeki Aoki, Yasushi Shimo, Nobutaka Hattori, Takahiro Shimizu, Hiroyuki Enomoto, Ritsuko Hanajima, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Seiki Konishi, An essential role of the intraparietal sulcus in response inhibition predicted by parcellation-based network, Journal of Neuroscience, 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2244-18.2019, 39, 13, 2509-2521, 2019.01, [URL], The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) features close anatomical and functional relationships with the prefrontal cortex. However, the necessity of the PPC in executive functions has been questioned. The present study used the stop-signal task to examine response inhibition, an executive function that inhibits prepotent response tendency. The brain activity and resting-state functional connectivity were measured to analyze a parcellation-based network that was aimed at identifying a candidate PPC region essential for response inhibition in humans. The intraparietal sulcus (IPS) was activated during response inhibition and connected with the inferior frontal cortex and the presupplementary motor area, the two frontal regions known to be necessary for response inhibition. Next, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to test the essential role of the IPS region for response inhibition. TMS over the IPS region prolonged the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), the standard behavioral index used to evaluate stopping performance, when stimulation was applied 30–0 ms before stopping. On the contrary, stimulation over the temporoparietal junction region, an area activated during response inhibition but lacking connectivity with the two frontal regions, did not show changes in SSRT. These results indicate that the IPS identified using the parcellation-based network plays an essential role in executive functions..
3. Kyohei Tanaka, Shinri Ohta, Ryuta Kinno, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Activation changes of the left inferior frontal gyrus for the factors of construction and scrambling in a sentence, Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B, 10.2183/pjab.93.031, 93, 7, 511-522, 2017.07, [URL].
4. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Dissociating Effects of Scrambling and Topicalization within the Left Frontal and Temporal Language Areas: An fMRI Study in Kaqchikel Maya, Frontiers in Psychology, 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00748, 8, 748, 1-14, 2017.05, [URL].
5. Classification of Japanese compounds based on the frequency of rendaku: A study using the Rendaku Database.
6. Ryuta Kinno, Shinri Ohta, Yoshihiro Muragaki, Takashi Maruyama, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Left frontal glioma induces functional connectivity changes in syntax-related networks, SPRINGERPLUS, 10.1186/s40064-015-1104-6, 4, 317, 1-6, 2015.07, [URL].
7. Effects of phonological and semantic factors on rendaku: A study using the rendaku database and logistic regression analyses.
8. Ryuta Kinno, Shinri Ohta, Yoshihiro Muragaki, Takashi Maruyama, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Differential reorganization of three syntax-related networks induced by a left frontal glioma, BRAIN, 10.1093/brain/awu013, 137, 4, 1193-1212, 2014.04, [URL].
9. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Syntactic Computation in the Human Brain: The Degree of Merger as a Key Factor, PLOS ONE, 10.1371/journal.pone.0056230, 8, e56230, 1-16, 2013.02, [URL].
Presentations
1. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Morpheme processing in the ventral temporal lobe: An MEG study of Japanese verbs, SoA XX, 2019.09.
2. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Dissociating the effects of morphemes and letters in visual word recognition: An MEG study of Japanese verbs, AMLaP 2019, 2019.09.
3. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Disentangling morphological processing and letter recognition: An MEG study of Japanese verbs, SNL 2019, 2019.08.
4. Shinri Ohta, Functional neuroimaging as a tool for testing/generating linguistic hypotheses, JSLS2019, 2019.07, [URL].
5. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Selective modulation of left inferior temporal activation by morphological decomposition: An MEG study of Japanese verbs, NEURO2019, 2019.07.
6. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Morphological, but not orthographic, decomposition of morphologically complex verbs in Japanese: An MEG study, PIPP2019, 2019.06.
7. Ohta S, Oseki Y, & Marantz A, Morphological decomposition selectively modulates activation in the left fusiform/inferior temporal gyri: An MEG study of Japanese verbs, 158th LSJ Meeting, Tokyo, Japan, June 2019..
8. Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz, Morphological decomposition of morphologically complex verbs in Japanese: An MEG study, NEUROLANG-AD 2019, 2019.04.
9. Ohta S, Neural basis of morphosyntactic processing in Japanese: An MEG study, TOGAKU Theoretical Linguistic Colloquium, Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 2018..
10. Ohta S, Brain mechanisms that support language acquisition and language learning, ATEP Summer Workshop 2018, Yamaguchi, Japan, Aug. 2018..
11. Ohta S, Computational principles of syntax in the language areas: Verification of the syntactic operations using fMRI, PhSJ 2018 Spring Meeting, Tokyo, Japan, June 2018..
12. Ohta S, fMRI and the neural basis of syntactic processing, in Workshop “Theoretical linguistics and cognitive neuroscience of language,” 152nd LSJ Meeting, Tokyo, Japan, June 2016..
13. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Mihoko Zushi, Hiroki Narita, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Merge-generability as a crucial concept in syntax: An experimental study, First International Symposium on the Physics of Language, 2016.03.
14. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Scrambling elicits larger activation than topicalization in the grammar centers: An fMRI study in Kaqchikel Maya, EXAL+, 2016.01.
15. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Dissociating scrambling from topicalization for activations in the grammar centers: An fMRI study in Kaqchikel Maya, SNL2015, 2015.10.
16. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, The left inferior frontal gyrus activation selectively increased by the object shift in a sentence: An fMRI study in Kaqchikel Maya, Neuroscience2015, 2015.07.
17. Ohta S, Koizumi M, & Sakai KL, Effects of word orders in Kaqchikel Maya from the viewpoint of the brain activation, Language, Thought, and Brain looking from Mayan languages, Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 2015..
18. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, The left frontal activation selectively modulated by syntactic processing: An fMRI study with a special VOS language, VMT2014, 2014.12.
19. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, An fMRI study in Kaqchikel Maya for the effect of scrambled sentences, Neuroscience2014, 2014.09.
20. Shinri Ohta, Masatoshi Koizumi, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Activation modulation in the left inferior frontal gyrus caused by scrambled word orders: An fMRI study in Kaqchikel Maya, SNL2014, 2014.08.
21. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Computational principles of syntax in the regions specialized for language, CREST Workshop with Noam Chomsky, 2014.03.
22. Shinri Ohta, Satoshi Ohta, Rendaku “enthusiasts” and rendaku “indifferents”: Classification of compound nouns based on the frequency of rendaku, 3rd ICPP, 2013.12.
23. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, The importance of the top-down connection through the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi for the computation of syntactic structures, NEURO2013, 2013.06.
24. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, The importance of the dorsal pathway for the computation of syntactic structures, Neuroscience2012, 2012.09.
25. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Specialization of the human language areas for the recursive computation of syntactic structures, NLC2011, 2011.11.
26. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, Elucidation of the recursive computation in the language areas: Embedding depth as a computational principle, Neuroscience2011, 2011.09.
27. Ohta S, Fukui N, & Sakai KL, The activation in the language areas selective for recursive computations of syntactic structures, 142nd LSJ Meeting, Tokyo, Japan, June 2011..
28. Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Kuniyoshi L. Sakai, The selective modulation of the frontal activations by embedding depths in sentences: An fMRI study, Neuro2010, 2010.09.
29. Ohta S, Fukui N, & Sakai KL, The role of the left caudate head on processing of nested structures: An fMRI study, 138th LSJ Meeting, Chiba, Japan, June 2009..
Membership in Academic Society
  • Society for the Neurobiology of Language
  • The Japan Neuroscience Society
  • The Linguistic Society of Japan
  • The Phonological Society of Japan
Educational
Educational Activities
Undergraduate Courses:
Introduction to literature and linguistics: Introduction to Neurolinguistics,
Introduction to Linguistics,
Linguistics and Applied Linguistics (Lecture): Introduction to Neuroscience of Language,
Linguistics and Applied Linguistics (Seminar): Experimental Methods in Neuroscience of Language,
Linguistics and Applied Linguistics (Practice): Graduation Thesis Writing,
The Humanities: Communication and community,
Foundations of the Humanities,

Graduate Courses:
Experimental Linguistics (Lecture): Introduction to Neuroscience of Language,
Experimental Linguistics (Seminar): Biolinguistics,
Methods in Linguistics,
Tutorial for Master's Students: Master's Thesis Writing,
Seminar for Doctoral Students: Doctoral Thesis Writing,
Studies of Modern Culture: Neurolinguistics Today