Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Papers
Mitsuhiro Furuse Last modified date:2021.06.15

Professor / Animal and Marine Bioresource Sciences / Department of Bioresource Sciences / Faculty of Agriculture


Papers
1. Taniguchi, E., Tashiro, A., Hattori, A., Furuse, M. and Yasuo, S., Photoperiodic changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasma metabolomic profiles in relation to depression-like behavior in mice, Behavioural Brain Research, 402:113100, 402, 113100, 2021.04.
2. Tran, P.V., Nguyen, L.T., Yang, H., Do, P.H., Torii, K., Putnam, G.L., Chowdhury, V.S., and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of L-arginine and D-arginine induces different effects under an acute stressful condition, BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, 10.1016/j.bbrc.2020.09.111, 533, 4, 965-970, 2020.12.
3. Eltahan, H.M., Nguyen, L.T., Han, G., Yang, H., Ali, N.M., Amber, K.A., Furuse, M. and Chowdhury, V.S., Hypothermia induced by central injection of sucralose potentially occurs via monoaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus of chicks, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2020.110752, 248, 2020.10.
4. Nozomu Takaki, Tatsuhiro Uchiwa, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Effect of postnatal photoperiod on DNA methylation dynamics in the mouse brain, Brain Research, 10.1016/j.brainres.2020.146725, 1733, 2020.04, Season of birth influences the onset of psychiatric diseases in mammals. Recent studies using rodent models have revealed that photoperiod during early life stages has a strong impact on affective and cognitive behaviors, neuronal activity, and hippocampal neurogenesis/astrogenesis in later life. The present study examined the effect of postnatal photoperiod on global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation dynamics in the mouse brain. Male mice born under short-day (SD) conditions were divided into SD and long-day (LD) groups on the day of birth. Temporal expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1/3a) with 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) levels, as well as protein levels of ten-eleven translocation (TET) 2 with 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) levels, were analyzed from postnatal day 4 (P4) to P21. Levels of 5-hmC in all hippocampal areas were higher in the LD group than in the SD group at P21, with a positive correlation between 5-hmC levels and TET2 levels throughout the experimental period. Inconsistent results were observed between DNMT1/3a mRNA levels and 5-mC levels. On the other hand, in the OB, mRNA levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3a were slightly lower in the LD group similar to 5-mC levels, but TET2 and 5-hmC levels were not influenced by the photoperiod. In conclusion, postnatal exposure of mice to LD conditions induces an increase in TET2-dependent DNA hydroxymethylation in the hippocampus, which might be involved in the long-term effects of postnatal photoperiod on neurogenesis and affective/cognitive behaviors..
5. Xuchun Qiu, Yukihiko Matsuyama, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Yohei Shimasaki, Yuji Oshima, Effects of Chattonella antiqua on the swimming behavior and brain monoamine metabolism of juvenile yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) (in press), Marine Pollution Bulletin, 152, 2020.03.
6. Shoko Sawano, Kento Baba, Yuka Sonoda, Jun-Ichiro Wakamatsu, Shozo Tomonaga, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Yusuke Sato, Ryuichi Tatsumi, Yoshihide Ikeuchi, Wataru Mizunoya, Beef extract supplementation promotes myoblast proliferation and myotube growth in C2C12 cells., European journal of nutrition, 10.1007/s00394-020-02205-4, 2020.02, PURPOSE: We previously determined that the intake of beef extract for 4 weeks increases skeletal muscle mass in rats. Thus, this study aimed to clarify whether beef extract has a hypertrophic effect on muscle cells and to determine the signaling pathway underlying beef extract-induced myotube hypertrophy. METHODS: We assessed the effects of beef extract supplement on mouse C2C12 skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and myotube growth. In addition, the phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2, and mTOR following beef extract supplementation was examined by western blotting. Furthermore, the bioactive constituents of beef extract were examined using amino acid analysis and dialysis. RESULTS: In the proliferative stage, beef extract significantly increased myoblast proliferation. In the differentiation stage, beef extract supplementation did not promote myoblast differentiation. In mature myotubes, beef extract supplementation increased myotube diameter and promoted protein synthesis. Although Akt and ERK1/2 levels were not affected, beef extract supplementation increased mTOR phosphorylation, which indicated that the mTOR pathway mediates beef extract-induced myotube hypertrophy. The hypertrophic activity was observed in fractions of > 7000 Da. CONCLUSIONS: Beef extract promoted C2C12 myoblast proliferation and C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Myotube hypertrophy was potentially induced by mTOR activation and active components in beef extract were estimated to be > 7000 Da..
7. G. Han, Y. Ouchi, T. Hirota, S. Haraguchi, T. Miyazaki, T. Arakawa, N. Masuhara, W. Mizunoya, R. Tatsumi, K. Tashiro, T. Bungo, M. Furuse, V. S. Chowdhury, Effects of l -leucine in ovo feeding on thermotolerance, growth and amino acid metabolism under heat stress in broilers, Animal, 10.1017/S1751731120000464, 2020.01, Recently, we found that in ovo feeding of l-leucine (l-Leu) afforded thermotolerance, stimulated lipid metabolism and modified amino acid metabolism in male broiler chicks. However, the effects of in ovo feeding of l-Leu on thermoregulation and growth performance until marketing age of broilers are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of in ovo feeding of l-Leu on body weight (BW) gain under control thermoneutral temperature or chronic heat stress. We measured changes of body temperature and food intake, organ weight, as well as amino acid metabolism and plasma metabolites under acute and chronic heat stress in broilers. A total of 168 fertilized Chunky broiler eggs were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups in experiments. The eggs were in ovo fed with l-Leu (34.5 μmol/500 μl per egg) or sterile water (500 μl/egg) during incubation. After hatching, male broilers were selected and assigned seven to nine replicates (one bird/replicate) in each group for heat challenge experiments. Broilers (29- or 30-day-old) were exposed to acute heat stress (30 ± 1°C) for 120 min or a chronic heat cyclic and continued heat stress (over 30 ± 1°C; ages, 15 to 44 days). In ovo feeding of l-Leu caused a significant suppression of enhanced body temperature without affecting food intake, plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids, ketone bodies, glucose, lactic acid or thyroid hormones under acute heat stress. Daily body temperature was significantly increased by l-Leu in ovo feeding under chronic heat stress. Interestingly, in ovo feeding of l-Leu caused a significantly higher daily BW gain compared with that of the control group under chronic heat stress. Moreover, some essential amino acids, including Leu and isoleucine, were significantly increased in the liver and decreased in the plasma by l-Leu in ovo feeding under acute heat stress. These results suggested that l-Leu in ovo feeding afforded thermotolerance to broilers under acute heat stress mainly through changing amino acid metabolism until marketing age..
8. Asako Shigemura, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Intracerebroventricular injection of l-pipecolic acid exerts hypnotic effects without activating nmda receptors in neonatal chicks under social isolation-induced stress, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0190067, 57, 1, 84-87, 2020.01, L-Pipecolic acid is an intermediate of L-lysine catabolism. Its central injection exerted a hypnotic effect on the brain, which was partially mediated by the activation of γ-aminobutyric acid-A and γ-aminobutyric acid-B receptors. L-Proline has also been shown to exert a similar effect on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Furthermore, L-pipecolic acid is known as L-homoproline, and both L-pipecolic acid and L-proline belong to the imino acid group; therefore, it is plausible that they share certain commonalities, including similar functions. However, the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with respect to the effects of L-pipecolic acid has not been examined yet. In the present study, the relationship between N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the central function of L-pipecolic acid was investigated in neonatal chicks. The behavioral postures for active wakefulness and standing/sitting motionless with eyes opened were significantly affected after intracerebroventricular injection of L-pipecolic acid; whereas, sitting motionless with head drooped (sleeping posture) was significantly enhanced. However, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801, did not affect these changes. In conclusion, the central administration of L-pipecolic acid did not exert hypnotic effects through the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in neonatal chicks. These results suggest that the imino group is not a determinant for activating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors..
9. Linh T.N. Nguyen, Hatem M. Eltahan, Cuong V. Pham, Guofeng Han, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Oral administration of watermelon rind extract to induce hypothermia in chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0190054, 57, 1, 37-44, 2020.01, Oral administration of L-citrulline (L-Cit) caused hypothermia, but L-Cit is not recommended in poultry diets in Japan. Watermelon is a natural source of L-Cit. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of watermelon waste, i.e., watermelon rind (WR) on the body temperature and plasma free amino acids of chicks. In Experiment 1, 14-day-old chicks were subjected to acute oral administration of WR extract (WRE) (2 ml) under control thermo-neutral temperature (CT). In Experiment 2, 15-day-old chicks were orally administered 1.6 ml of either WRE, low-dose L-Cit (7.5 mmol/10 ml), or high-dose L-Cit (15 mmol/10 ml) under CT. In both experiments, rectal temperature (RT) and plasma free amino acids were analyzed. In Experiment 3, after dual oral administration of (1.6 ml) WRE or L-Cit (15 mmol/10 ml), 15-day-old chicks were exposed to high ambient temperature (HT; 35±1℃, 2 h) to monitor changes in RT. Acute oral administration of WRE significantly reduced RT under CT. The degree of RT reduction by WRE was similar to that by high L-Cit. Moreover, RT was significantly low at HT owing to the oral administration of WRE. However, the reduced RT was difficult to explain by the content of Cit in WRE alone. In conclusion, WRE could be used as a dietary ingredient to reduce body temperature for imparting thermotolerance in chicks..
10. Kenta Aso, Takuma Nishigawa, Satsuki Nagamachi, Mayumi Takakura, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally administrated D-arginine exhibits higher enrichment in the brain and milk than l-arginine in ICR mice, Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 10.1292/jvms.19-0630, 82, 3, 307-313, 2020.01, D-Amino acids exert various physiological functions and are widely present in animals. However, they are absorbed to a lesser extent than L-amino acids. Little is known about D-arginine (D-Arg); however, its isomer L-Arg serves as a substrate for several metabolites and exhibits various functions including promotion of growth hormone secretion. Milk is the only nutrient source for infants; it plays an important role during their initial growth and brain development. No studies have evaluated the availability of D-Arg in the brain and milk in mammals. Here, we have studied the differential availability of orally administered D-and L-Arg in the brain and milk using ICR mice. Our results revealed that without D-Arg administration, D-Arg was undetectable in both plasma and brain samples. However, the plasma D-Arg was about twice the concentration of L-Arg post administration of the same. In the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, L-Arg concentration remained almost constant for over period of 90 min after L-Arg treatment. Nevertheless, the L-Arg concentration decreased after D-Arg administration with time compared to the case post L-Arg administration. Contrastingly, D-Arg level sharply increased at both the brain regions with time after D-Arg treatment. Furthermore, L-Arg concentration in the milk hardly increased after L-Arg administration. Interestingly, oral administration of D-Arg showed efficient enrichment of D-Arg in milk, compared with L-Arg. Thus, our results imply that D-Arg may be available for brain development and infant nourishment through milk as an oral drug and/or nutrient supplement..
11. Tomonaga S, Furuse M, Nutritional characteristics and functions of D-amino acids in the chicken., Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0190062, 57, 1, 18-27, 2020.01.
12. Kawase T, Furuse M, Effects of oral administration of yoghurt whey on free amino acid concentration in rat brains, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 22, 2, 84-94, 2019.10.
13. Tran PV, Do PH, Han G, Bahry MA, Yang H, Yamamoto E, Asami Y, Chowdhury VS, Furuse M, Oral administration of a medium containing L-citrulline-producing live bacteria reduces body temperature in chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 56, 4, 285-289, 2019.10.
14. Yunhao Wang, Guofeng Han, Cuong V. Pham, Kiyohiko Koyanagi, Yandejia Song, Ryunosuke Sudo, Johan Lauwereyns, John F. Cockrem, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, An acute increase in water temperature can increase free amino acid concentrations in the blood, brain, liver, and muscle in goldfish (Carassius auratus), Fish Physiology and Biochemistry, 10.1007/s10695-019-00642-5, 45, 4, 1343-1354, 2019.08, Water temperature directly affects the body temperature in fish, so increasing water temperatures in oceans and rivers will lead to increases in fish body temperatures. Whilst a range of responses of fish to increases in water temperature have been measured, amino acid metabolism in a fish under high water temperature (HT) conditions has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of an acute increase in water temperature on oxygen consumption, plasma cortisol concentrations, and free amino acid concentrations in plasma and several tissues in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Oxygen consumption and plasma cortisol concentrations were increased in goldfish exposed to HT (30 ± 1 °C) for 200 min compared with goldfish at a control water temperature (CT 17 ± 1 °C). Oxygen consumption and plasma cortisol concentrations in both groups of fish combined were positively correlated. When goldfish were exposed to HT for 300 min oxygen consumption and plasma concentrations of 15 free amino acids were increased compared with goldish at CT. Concentrations of several free amino acids were increased to varying extents in the brain, liver, and muscle tissues. In conclusion, an acute increase in water temperature affected amino acid metabolism differently in the brain, liver, and muscle tissues. Goldfish will be a useful species for further studies of the possible roles of various amino acids in the brain, muscle, and liver during acute increases in water temperature in fish..
15. Hamada M, Ihara T, Furuse M, Differences in free amino acid concentrations in milk between Wistar and Wistar Kyoto rats, Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 81, 6, 838-845, 2019.06.
16. Daiki Harada, Satsuki Nagamachi, Kenta Aso, Kazuki Ikeda, Yoshihiro Takahashi, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Oral administration of L-ornithine increases the content of both collagen constituting amino acids and polyamines in mouse skin, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 10.1016/j.bbrc.2019.03.147, 512, 4, 712-715, 2019.05, L-Ornithine is found in animals as a free amino acid and is a vital component of the urea cycle in the liver; it is reported to have various functions such as promoting wound healing, promoting growth hormone secretion, hypnotic effects, and so on. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single oral administration of L-ornithine on 1) the metabolism of amino acids in the liver and skin of mice and 2) the metabolism of polyamines in the skin of mice. To this end, ICR mice were separated into five groups; four groups were administered L-ornithine dissolved in fresh water (3.0 mmol/10 ml/kg) and a fifth group, the control, was not administered L-ornithine. The four groups comprised mice sampled at specific times (30, 60, 120 and 180 min) after oral administration of L-ornithine. We found that metabolism of L-ornithine to L-citrulline was rapid and that L-citrulline concentration remained high in mice sampled at later stages. Similarly, the concentrations of L-proline and glycine, both of which are important components of collagen, also rapidly increased in the skin following L-ornithine treatment. The concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), which are known to increase the synthesis of certain proteins and enhance the epidermal barrier function, were also significantly increased in the skin. Our study shows that oral administration of L-ornithine significantly influences the chemical composition of the skin of mice through increases in both amino acids and polyamines after a short period of time..
17. Hui Yang, Vishwajit Surchowdhury, Guofeng Han, Rong Zhang, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Flavangenol regulates gene expression of HSPs, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative factors to protect primary chick brain cells exposed to high temperature, Journal of Thermal Biology, 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2019.02.010, 81, 1-11, 2019.04.
18. Kawase T, Furuse M, Long-term administration of yoghurt improves spatial memory in mice, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 22, 1, 1-13, 2019.04.
19. Mizuki Hamada, Takuma Nishigawa, Saori Maesono, Kenta Aso, Hiromi Ikeda, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Decreased stress-induced depression-like behavior in lactating rats is associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain monoamines, and brain amino acid metabolism, Stress, 10.1080/10253890.2019.1584179, 2019.01.
20. Yamashita, Y.,Akimoto, Y. and Furuse, M., Inhibitory effects of dietary kale on 2, 4, 6-trinitrochlorobenzene-induced dermatitis in mice, Current Topics in Phytochemistry, 14, 1-12, 2018.12.
21. Mohammad A. Bahry, Hui Yang, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Guofeng Han, Hatem M. Eltahan, Vishwajit Surchowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Reduction in voluntary food intake, but not fasting, stimulates hypothalamic gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone precursor mRNA expression in chicks under heat stress, Neuropeptides, 10.1016/j.npep.2018.09.001, 71, 90-96, 2018.10.
22. L-Leucine increases the daily body temperature and affords thermotolerance in broiler chicks..
23. Takuma Nishigawa, Satsuki Nagamachi, Hiromi Ikeda, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Restraint stress in lactating mice alters the levels of sulfur-containing amino acids in milk, Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 10.1292/jvms.17-0661, 80, 3, 503-509, 2018.03, It is well known that maternal stress during the gestation and lactation periods induces abnormal behavior in the offspring and causes a lowering of the offspring’s body weight. Various causes of maternal stress during the lactation period, relating to, for example, maternal nutritional status and reduced maternal care, have been considered. However, little is known about the effects on milk of maternal stress during the lactation period. The current study aimed to determine whether free amino acids, with special reference to sulfur-containing amino acids in milk, are altered by restraint stress in lactating mice. The dams in the stress group were restrained for 30 min at postnatal days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12. Restraint stress caused a reduction in the body weight of lactating mice. The concentration of taurine and cystathionine in milk was significantly higher in the stress group, though stress did not alter their concentration in maternal plasma. The ratio of taurine concentration in milk to its concentration in maternal plasma was significantly higher in the stress group, suggesting that stress promoted taurine transportation into milk. Furthermore, taurine concentration in milk was positively correlated with corticosterone levels in plasma. In conclusion, restraint stress in lactating mice caused the changes in the metabolism and in the transportation of sulfur-containing amino acids and resulted in higher taurine concentration in milk. Taurine concentration in milk could also be a good parameter for determining stress status in dams..
24. Satsuki Nagamachi, Takuma Nishigawa, Mayumi Takakura, Hiromi Ikeda, Momoko Kodaira, Takeshi Yamaguchi, Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Dietary L-serine modifies free amino acid composition of maternal milk and lowers the body weight of the offspring in mice, Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 10.1292/jvms.17-0577, 80, 2, 235-241, 2018.02, The growth of offspring is affected not only by the protein in maternal milk but also by the free amino acids (FAAs) contained in it. L-Serine (L-Ser) is known as an important FAA for the development of the central nervous system and behavioral activity. However, it is not clear whether L-Ser is transported into the pool of FAAs contained in milk and thereby affects the growth of offspring. Using mice, the current study investigated the effects of dietary L-Ser during pregnancy and lactation on milk and plasma FAA composition, as well as on growth, behavior, and plasma FAAs of offspring. Dietary L-Ser did not significantly affect the maternal, anxiety-like, or cognitive behaviors of either the dam or the offspring. The FAA composition notably differed between plasma and milk in dams. In milk, dietary L-Ser increased free L-Ser levels, while glutamic acid, L-alanine, D-alanine and taurine levels were decreased. The body weight of the offspring was lowered by dietary L-Ser. The concentrations of plasma FAAs in 13-day-old offspring (fed only milk) were not altered, but 20-day-old offspring (fed both milk and parental diet) showed higher plasma L-Ser and D-Ser concentrations as a result of the dietary L-Ser treatment. In conclusion, the present study found that dietary L-Ser transported easily from maternal plasma to milk and that dietary L-Ser treatment could change the FAA composition of milk, but that an enhanced level of L-Ser in milk did not enhance the plasma L-Ser level in the offspring..
25. Nishigawa, T., Nagamachi, S., Chowdhury, V. S., Yasuo, S. and Furuse, M., Taurine and β-alanine intraperitoneal injection in lactating mice modifies the growth and behavior of offspring, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 495, 2, 2024-2029, 2018.01.
26. Guofeng Han, Hui Yang, Takashi Bungo, Hiromi Ikeda, Yunhao Wang, Linh T.N. Nguyen, Hatem M. Eltahan, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, In ovo L-leucine administration stimulates lipid metabolisms in heat-exposed male, but not female, chicks to afford thermotolerance, Journal of Thermal Biology, 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.10.020, 71, 74-82, 2018.01, Thermal manipulation declined embryonic brain and liver concentrations of leucine (Leu). L-Leu in ovo injection afforded thermotolerance in male broiler chicks. This study aimed to examine the role of in ovo injection of L-Leu in metabolic functions, and differences between male and female broiler chicks in thermotolerance. L-Leu injection was performed in ovo on embryonic day (ED) 7 to reveal its role in metabolic activity in embryos and in post-hatch male and female broiler chicks under heat stress. To examine the metabolic activity of embryos, oxygen (O2) consumption, carbon dioxide (CO2) production, heat production and plasma metabolites were analyzed. Rectal temperature, food intake and plasma metabolites were also analyzed in heat-exposed (35 ± 1 °C for 180 min) male and female broiler chicks. It was found that O2 consumption, heat production, and plasma triacylglycerol (TG) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations in ED 14 embryos were significantly increased by in ovo injection of L-Leu in comparison with the controls. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly increased in both male and female chicks under heat stress, but in ovo injection of L-Leu attenuated the increase in male chicks. In contrast, plasma TG, NEFA, and ketone body concentrations were significantly higher in male chicks injected in ovo with L-Leu, but not in similarly injected female chicks, compared with control chicks, all under heat stress. Rectal temperature and food intake were significantly lower in male, but not female, chicks under heat stress injected in ovo with L-Leu. In conclusion, in ovo L-Leu administration enhanced the prenatal metabolic rate and lipid metabolisms, which possibly appeared as sex-dependent fashion to facilitate thermotolerance in males. A reduction in heat production through lowered food intake in heat-exposed male, but not female chicks injected in ovo with L-Leu may help to afford thermotolerance in male broiler chicks under heat stress..
27. Shinobu Yasuo, Ayaka Iwamoto, Sang-il Lee, Shotaro Ochiai, Rina Hitachi, Satomi Shibata, Nobuo Uotsu, Chie Tarumizu, Sayuri Matsuoka, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shigekazu Higuchi, L-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans, JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 10.3945/jn.117.255380, 147, 12, 2347-2355, 2017.12, Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood.
Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans.
Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 L-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before L-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of L-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean+/-SD age 22.2+/-1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase.
Results: L-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts inmice (1.86-fold; P < 0.05). Both L-serine and its metabolite D-serine, a coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, exerted this effect, but D-serine concentrations in the hypothalamus did not increase after L-serine administration. The effect of L-serine was blocked by picrotoxin, an antagonist of g-aminobutyric acid A receptors, but not by MK801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. L-Serine administration altered the long-term expression patterns of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. After advancing the light-dark cycle by 6h, L-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, L-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means+/-SEMs-L- serine: 25.9+/-6.6 min; placebo: 12.1+/-7.0 min; P < 0.05).
Conclusion: These results suggest that L-serine enhances light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances..
28. Hatem M. Eltahan, Mohammad A. Bahry, Hui Yang, Guofeng Han, Linh T. N. Nguyen, Hiromi Ikeda, Mohamed N. Ali, Khairy A. Amber, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Central NPY-Y5 sub-receptor partially functions as a mediator of NPY-induced hypothermia and affords thermotolerance in heat-exposed fasted chicks, Physiological Reports, 10.14814/phy2.13511, 5, 23, e13511, 2017.12, Exposure of chicks to a high ambient temperature (HT) has previously been shown to increase neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression in the brain. Furthermore, it was found that NPY has anti-stress functions in heat-exposed fasted chicks. The aim of the study was to reveal the role of central administration of NPY on thermotolerance ability and the induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) and NPY sub-receptors (NPYSRs) in fasted chicks with the contribution of plasma metabolite changes. Six- or seven-day-old chicks were centrally injected with 0 or 375 pmol of NPY and exposed to either HT (35 ± 1°C) or control thermoneutral temperature (CT: 30 ± 1°C) for 60 min while fasted. NPY reduced body temperature under both CT and HT. NPY enhanced the brain mRNA expression of HSP-70 and -90, as well as of NPYSRs-Y5, -Y6, and -Y7, but not -Y1, -Y2, and -Y4, under CT and HT. A coinjection of an NPYSR-Y5 antagonist (CGP71683) and NPY (375 pmol) attenuated the NPY-induced hypothermia. Furthermore, central NPY decreased plasma glucose and triacylglycerol under CT and HT and kept plasma corticosterone and epinephrine lower under HT. NPY increased plasma taurine and anserine concentrations. In conclusion, brain NPYSR-Y5 partially afforded protective thermotolerance in heat-exposed fasted chicks. The NPY-mediated reduction in plasma glucose and stress hormone levels and the increase in free amino acids in plasma further suggest that NPY might potentially play a role in minimizing heat stress in fasted chicks..
29. Do, P.H., Tran, P.V., Bahry, M.A., Yang, H., Han, G., Tsuchiya, A., Asami, Y., Furuse, M. and Chowdhury, V.S., Oral administration of a medium containing both Daspartate-producing live bacteria and D-aspartate reduces rectal temperature in chicks, British Poultry Science, 58, 5, 569-577, 2017.10.
30. Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Guofeng Han, Mohammad A. Bahry, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Hui Yang, Mitsuhiro Furuse, L-Citrulline acts as potential hypothermic agent to afford thermotolerance in chicks, JOURNAL OF THERMAL BIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.07.007, 69, 163-170, 2017.10, Recently we demonstrated that L-citrulline (L-Cit) causes hypothermia in chicks. However, the question of how L-Cit mediates hypothermia remained elusive. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine some possible factors in the process of L-Cit-mediated hypothermia and to confirm whether L-Cit can also afford thermotolerance in young chicks. Chicks were subjected to oral administration of L-Cit along with intraperitoneal injection of a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N-G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester HCl (L-NAME), to examine the involvement of NO in the process of hypothermia. Food intake and plasma metabolites were also analyzed after oral administration of L-Cit in chicks. To examine thermotolerance, chicks were orally administered with a single dose of L-Cit (15 mmol/10 ml/kg body weight) or the same dose twice within a short interval of 1 h (dual oral administration) before the exposure to high ambient temperature (35 +/- 1 degrees C) for 180 min. Although the rectal temperature was reduced following administration of L-Cit, L-NAME caused a greater reduction. L-NAME reduced total NO2 and NO3 (NOx) in plasma, which confirmed its inhibitory effect on NO. A single oral administration of L-Cit mediated a persistent state of hypothermia for the 300 min of the study without affecting food intake. It was further found that plasma glucose was significantly lower in L-Cit-treated chicks. Dual oral administration of L-Cit, but not a single oral administration, afforded thermotolerance without a significant change in plasma NOx in chicks. In conclusion, our results suggest that L-Cit-mediated hypothermia and thermotolerance may not be involved in NO production. L-Cit-mediated thermotolerance further suggests that L-Cit may serve as an important nutritional supplement that could help in coping with summer heat..
31. Nagasawa, M., Otsuka, T., Togo, Y., Yamanaga, M., Yoshida, J., Uotsu, N., Teramoto, S., Yasuo, S., Furuse, M., Single and chronic L-serine treatments exert antidepressant-like effects in rats possibly by different means, Amino Acids, 49, 9, 1561-1570, 2017.09.
32. Ryuichi Tatsumi, Takahiro Suzuki, Mai-Khoi Q. Do, Yuki Ohya, Judy E. Anderson, Ayumi Shibata, Mai Kawaguchi, Shunpei Ohya, Hideaki Ohtsubo, Wataru Mizunoya, Shoko Sawano, Yusuke Komiya, Riho Ichitsubo, Koichi Ojima, Shin-ichiro Nishimatsu, Tsutomu Nohno, Yutaka Ohsawa, Yoshihide Sunada, Mako Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Yoshihide Ikeuchi, Takanori Nishimura, Takeshi Yagi, Ronald E. Allen, Slow-Myofiber Commitment by Semaphorin 3A Secreted from Myogenic Stem Cells, STEM CELLS, 10.1002/stem.2639, 35, 7, 1815-1834, 2017.07, Recently, we found that resident myogenic stem satellite cells upregulate a multi-functional secreted protein, semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), exclusively at the early-differentiation phase in response to muscle injury; however, its physiological significance is still unknown. Here we show that Sema3A impacts slow-twitch fiber generation through a signaling pathway, cell membrane receptor (neuropilin2-plexinA3) > myogenin-myocyte enhancer factor 2D slow myosin heavy chain. This novel axis was found by small interfering RNA-transfection experiments in myoblast cultures, which also revealed an additional element that Sema3A-neuropilinl/plexinAl, A2 may enhance slow-fiber formation by activating signals that inhibit fast myosin expression. Importantly, satellite cell-specific Sema3A conditional-knockout adult mice (Pax7CreERT2-Sema3Af" activated by tamoxifen-i.p. injection) provided direct in vivo evidence for the Sema3A-driven program, by showing that slow-fiber generation and muscle endurance were diminished after repair from cardiotoxin-injury of gastrocnemius muscle. Overall, the findings highlight an active role for satellite cell-secreted Sema3A ligand as a key "commitment factor" for the slow-fiber population during muscle regeneration. Results extend our understanding of the myogenic stem-cell strategy that regulates fiber-type differentiation and is responsible for skeletal muscle contractility, energy metabolism, fatigue resistance, and its susceptibility to aging and disease..
33. Edi Erwan, Zulfikar, Eniza Saleh, Bambang Kuntoro, Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally Administered D-Aspartate Depresses Rectal Temperature and Alters Plasma Triacylglycerol and Glucose Concentrations in Broiler Chicks, JOURNAL OF POULTRY SCIENCE, 10.2141/jpsa.0160010, 54, 3, 205-211, 2017.07, L-Aspartate (L-Asp), D-aspartate (D-Asp) or their chemical conjugates plays important physiological roles in regulating food intake, plasma metabolites and thermoregulation in animals. However, there are very few studies available in layers and no reports have been found in broilers. Broilers are very important commercial birds for meat production, so effects of L- or D-Asp in broilers would provide new physiological insight of this strain. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of oral administration of L- or D-Asp on feed intake, rectal temperature and some plasma metabolites in broiler chicks. Broiler chicks (5 days old) were orally administered with different doses (0, 3.75, 7.5 and 15 mmol/kg body weight) of L- or D-Asp. At 120 min after administration of L- or D-Asp, the blood was immediately collected through the jugular vein. The rectal temperature of chicks was measured at 30, 60 and 120 min after administration using a digital thermometer with an accuracy of +/- 0.1 degrees C, by inserting the thermistor probe in the rectum to a depth of 2 cm. A repeated-measures two-way ANOVA was applied for the analysis of feed intake and rectal temperature. Plasma metabolites were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and regression equations. The study showed that oral administration of both L- and D-Asp did not alter feed intake. However, D-Asp, but not L-Asp, dose-dependently decreased the rectal temperature in chicks. It was also found that D-Asp increased plasma glucose and decreased triacylglycerol concentrations. The changes in plasma metabolites further indicate that D-Asp treatment modulates the energy metabolism in broiler chicks. In conclusion, D-Asp may be a beneficial nutrient not only for layers but also for broilers, since orally administered D-Asp lowered rectal temperature without reducing feed intake..
34. Takeshi Yamaguchi, Mao Nagasawa, Hiromi Ikeda, Momoko Kodaira, Kimie Minaminaka, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Manipulation of dopamine metabolism contributes to attenuating innate high locomotor activity in ICR mice, BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.04.001, 328, 227-234, 2017.06, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is defined as attention deficiency, restlessness and distraction. The main characteristics of ADHD are hyperactivity, impulsiveness and carelessness. There is a possibility that these abnormal behaviors, in particular hyperactivity, are derived from abnormal dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. To elucidate the mechanism of high locomotor activity, the relationship between innate activity levels and brain monoamines and amino acids was investigated in this study. Differences in locomotor activity between ICR, C57BL/6J and CBA/N mice were determined using the open field test. Among the three strains, ICR mice showed the greatest amount of locomotor activity. The level of striatal and cerebellar DA was lower in ICR mice than in C57BL/6J mice, while the level of L-tyrosine (L-Tyr), a DA precursor, was higher in ICR mice. These results suggest that the metabolic conversion of L-Tyr to DA is lower in ICR mice than it is in C57BL/6J mice. Next, the effects of intraperitoneal injection of (6R)-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin dihydrochloride (BH4) (a coenzyme for tyrosine hydroxylase) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) on DA metabolism and behavior in ICR mice were investigated. The DA level in the brain was increased by BH4 administration, but the increased DA did not influence behavior. However, L-DOPA administration drastically lowered locomotor activity and increased DA concentration in several parts of the brain. The reduced locomotor activity may have been a consequence of the overproduction of DA. In conclusion, the high level of locomotor activity in ICR mice may be explained by a strain-specific DA metabolism..
35. Ouanh Phomvisith, Hideyuki Takahashi, Ha Thi Mai, Yuji Shiotsuka, Atsuko Matsubara, Toshihisa Sugino, Christopher D. Mcmahon, Tetsuji Etoh, Ryoichi Fujino, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Takafumi Gotoh, Effects of nutritional status on hormone concentrations of the somatotropin axis and metabolites in plasma and colostrum of Japanese Black cows, ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/asj.12686, 88, 4, 643-652, 2017.04, We aimed to determine the effects of nutritional status on concentrations of somatotropic axis hormones (growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)), insulin and metabolites (glucose, total protein and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA)) in the plasma and colostrum in late antepartum cows. Eight pregnant Japanese Black cows were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (n=4 per group). Control cows (CON) received 100% of their nutritional requirements until parturition, whereas restricted group cows (RES) received 60% of their nutritional requirements. Blood samples were taken during the antepartum period, and blood and colostrum samples were collected on days 0, 1, and 3 after calving. Compared to the CON group, the RES group had higher concentrations of GH and NEFA in plasma, but significantly lower concentrations of glucose and insulin in plasma. The concentrations of GH in plasma after calving were significantly higher, but total plasma protein was significantly lower in RES than in CON cows. Compared to the CON group, the RES group had significantly higher concentrations of GH in colostrum, but significantly lower total concentrations of protein in colostrum. Concentrations of IGF-1 were not different between the two groups. These findings suggest that maternal nutritional status during late gestation influences concentrations of GH and total protein in the blood and colostrum of Japanese Black cows..
36. Ikeda, H., Yamaguchi, T., Kodaira, M., Bahry, M.A., Chowdhury V.S., Yasuo, S., Furuse, M., Differences in activity levels as well as in brain amino acid levels and monoamine metabolisms, that exist between the Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) and the Roborovskii hamster (P. roborovskii) are scarcely influenced by social isolation, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 20, 1, 47-58, 2017.04.
37. Mohammad A. Bahry, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Hui Yang, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Guofeng Han, Hiromi Ikeda, John F. Cockrem, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Central administration of neuropeptide Y differentially regulates monoamines and corticosterone in heat-exposed fed and fasted chicks, NEUROPEPTIDES, 10.1016/j.npep.2016.11.008, 62, 93-100, 2017.04, Recently, we demonstrated that brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression was increased in heat exposed chicks. However, the functions of brain NPY during heat stress are unknown. This study was conducted to investigate whether centrally administered NPY affects food intake, rectal temperature, monoamines, stress hormones and plasma metabolites in chicks under high ambient temperatures (HT). Five or six-day-old chicks were centrally injected with 0,188 or 375 pmol of NPY and exposed to either HT (35 +/- 1 degrees C) or a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 +/- 1 degrees C) for 3 h whilst fed or fasted. NPY increased food intake under both CT and HT. NPY reduced rectal temperature 1 and 2 h after central administration under CT, but not under HT. Interestingly, NPY decreased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations in fed chicks, but increased concentrations of brain dopamine and its metabolites in fasted and fed chicks, respectively. Plasma epinephrine was decreased by NPY in fed chicks, but plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine were increased significantly by NPY in fasted-heat exposed chicks. Furthermore, NPY significantly reduced plasma corticosterone concentrations in fasted chicks. Plasma glucose and triacylglycerol were increased by NPY in fed chicks, but triacylglycerol declined in fasted NPY-injected chicks. In conclusion, brain NPY may attenuate the reduction of food intake during heat stress and the increased brain NPY might be a potential regulator of the monoamines and corticosterone to modulate stress response in heat-exposed chicks. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
38. Ayako Tashiro, Satomi Shibata, Yusuke Takai, Tatsuhiro Uchiwa, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Changes in photoperiod alter Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle of C57BL/6J mice, BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, 10.1016/j.bbrc.2017.02.023, 485, 1, 82-88, 2017.03, Seasonal changes in photoperiod influence body weight and metabolism in mice. Here, we examined the effect of changes in photoperiod on the expression of glucose transporter genes in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of C57BL/6J mice. Glut4 expression was lower in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice exposed to a short-duration day (SD) than those to a long-duration day (LD), with accompanying changes in GLUT4 protein levels. Although Glut4 expression in the mouse coleus muscle was higher under SD than under LD, GLUT4 protein levels remained unchanged. To confirm the functional significance of photoperiod-induced changes in Glut4 expression, we checked for variations in insulin sensitivity. Blood glucose levels after insulin injection remained high under SD, suggesting that the mice exposed to SD showed lower sensitivity to insulin than those exposed to LD. We also attempted to clarify the relationship between Glut4 expression and physical activity in the mice following changes in photoperiod. Locomotor activity, as detected via infrared beam sensor, was lower under SD than under LD. However, when we facilitated voluntary activity by using running wheels, the rotation of wheels was similar for both groups of mice. Although physical activity levels were enhanced due to running wheels, Glut4 expression in the gastrocnemius muscle remained unchanged. Thus, variations in photoperiod altered Glut4 expression in the mouse skeletal muscle, with subsequent changes in GLUT4 protein levels and insulin sensitivity; these effects might be independent of physical activity. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
39. Hiromi Ikeda, Mao Nagasawa, Takeshi Yamaguchi, Kimie Minaminaka, Ryosei Goda, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Disparities in activity levels and learning ability between Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) and Roborovskii hamster (Phodopus roborovskii), ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/asj.12659, 88, 3, 533-545, 2017.03, The Djungarian hamster and the Roborovskii hamster belong to the same genus of Phodopus. However, the Djungarian hamster is tame and shows sedative behavior, while Roborovskii hamster is not tame and shows high levels of locomotor activity. Hyperactivity occurs in animals with tameless behavior. Tameness or tamelessness behavior is very important because tameness helps for breeding and controlling as well as it enables a strong human-animal bond. In the present study, we examined the relationships between activity levels and cognitive function in Djungarian and Roborovskii hamsters. Three types of behavioral tests were performed to analyze their activity levels, memory and leaning ability. The levels of L- and D-amino acids and monoamines in the brain were then determined. Roborovskii hamsters showed significantly higher locomotor activity than Djungarian hamsters. Memory ability was not significantly different between the two hamsters, but Roborovskii hamsters showed lower learning ability. Brain levels of D-serine which is related to enhancement in memory and learning ability, were significantly higher in Djungarian hamsters, but the reverse was true for brain dopamine and serotonin levels. These results suggest that these differences in brain metabolism may be related to the behavioral differences between the two hamsters..
40. Momoko Kodaira, Mao Nagasawa, Takeshi Yamaguchi, Hiromi Ikeda, Kimie Minaminaka, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Aging rather than stress strongly influences amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs of female mice, MECHANISMS OF AGEING AND DEVELOPMENT, 10.1016/j.mad.2016.12.006, 162, 72-79, 2017.03, Aging and stress affect quality of life, and proper nourishment is one of means of preventing this effect. Today, there is a focus on the amount of protein consumed by elderly people; however, changes in the amino acid metabolism of individuals have not been fully considered. In addition, the difference between average life span and healthy life years is larger in females than it is in males. To prolong the healthy life years of females, in the present study we evaluated the influence of stress and aging on metabolism and emotional behavior by comparing young and middle-aged female mice. After 28 consecutive days of immobilization stress, behavioral tests were conducted and tissue sampling was performed. The results showed that the body weight of middle-aged mice was severely lowered by stress, but emotional behaviors were hardly influenced by either aging or stress. Aging influenced changes in amino acid metabolism in the brain and increased various amino acid levels in the uterus and ovary. In conclusion, we found that aged mice were more susceptible to stress in terms of body-weight reduction, and that amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs were largely influenced by aging rather than by stress. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved..
41. Takahiro Kawase, Mao Nagasawa, Hiromi Ikeda, Shinobu Yasuo, Yasuhiro Koga, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Gut microbiota of mice putatively modifies amino acid metabolism in the host brain, BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 10.1017/S0007114517000678, 117, 6, 775-783, 2017.03, Recently, it has been found that the gut microbiota influences functions of the host brain by affecting monoamine metabolism. The present study focused on the relationship between the gut microbiota and the brain amino acids. Specific pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) mice were used as experimental models. Plasma and brain regions were sampled from mice at 7 and 16 weeks of age, and analysed for free D-and L-amino acids, which are believed to affect many physiological functions. At 7 weeks of age, plasma concentrations of D-aspartic acid (D-Asp), L-alanine (L-Ala), L-glutamine (L-Gln) and taurine were higher in SPF mice than in GF mice, but no differences were found at 16 weeks of age. Similar patterns were observed for the concentrations of L-Asp in striatum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and L-arginine (L-Arg), L-Ala and L-valine (L-Val) in striatum. In addition, the concentrations of L-Asp, D-Ala, L-histidine, L-isoleucine (L-Ile), L-leucine (L-Leu), L-phenylalanine and L-Val were significantly higher in plasma of SPF mice when compared with those of GF mice. The concentrations of L-Arg, L-Gln, L-Ile and L-Leu were significantly higher in SPF than in GF mice, but those of D-Asp, D-serine and L-serine were higher in some brain regions of GF mice than in those of SPF mice. In conclusion, the concentration of amino acids in the host brain seems to be dependent on presence of the gut microbiota. Amino acid metabolism in the host brain may be modified by manipulating microbiota communities..
42. Guofeng Han, Hui Yang, Mohammad A. Bahry, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Hiromi Ikeda, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, L-Leucine acts as a potential agent in reducing body temperature at hatching and affords thermotolerance in broiler chicks, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2016.10.013, 204, 48-56, 2017.02, Thermal manipulation (TM) of incubation temperature causes metabolic alterations and contributes to improving thermotolerance in chicks post hatching. However, there has been no report on amino acid metabolism during TM and the part it plays in thermotolerance. In this study, we therefore first analyzed free amino acid concentrations in the embryonic brain and liver during TM (38.6 degrees C, 6 h/d during embryonic day (ED) 10 to ED 18). It was found that leucine (Leu), phenylalanine and lysine were significantly decreased in the embryonic brain and liver. We then chose L-Leu and other branched-chain amino acids (L-isoleucine (L-Ile) and L-valine (L-Val)) for in ovo injection on ED 7 to reveal their roles in thermoregulation, growth, food intake and thermotolerance in chicks. It was found that in ovo injection of L-Leu, but not of L-Ileu or L-Val, caused a significant decline in body temperature at hatching and increased food intake and body weight gain in broiler chicks. Interestingly, in ovo injection of L-Leu resulted in the acquisition of thermotolerance under high ambient temperature (35 +/- 1 degrees C for 180 min) in comparison with the control thermoneutral temperature (28 +/- 1 degrees C for 180 min). These results indicate that the free amino acid concentrations during embryogenesis were altered by TM. L-Leu administration in eggs caused a reduction in body temperature at hatching, and afforded thermotolerance in heat-exposed young chicks, further suggesting that L-Leu may be one of the key metabolic factors involved in controlling body temperature in embryos, as well as in producing thermotolerance after hatching. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
43. Takahashi, H., Matsubara, A., Saito, A., Ouanh, P., Shiga, A., Mai, H.T., Sugino, T., Christopher, M.D., Etoh, T., Shiotsuka, Y., Furuse, M., Fujino, R., Gotoh, T., Higher milk-replacer intake during pre-weaning enhances post-weaning insulin-like growth factor 1 levels for Japanese Black cattle, Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology, 8, 1, 2017.01.
44. Atsuko Matsubara, Hideyuki Takahashi, Akira Saito, Aoi Nomura, Khounsaknalath Sithyphone, Christopher D. Mcmahon, Ryoichi Fujino, Yuji Shiotsuka, Tetsuji Etoh, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Takafumi Gotoh, Effects of a high milk intake during the pre-weaning period on nutrient metabolism and growth rate in Japanese Black cattle, ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/asj.12547, 87, 9, 1130-1136, 2016.09, This study aimed to determine the effects of feeding an increased volume of high-fat milk during the early post-natal life on metabolite concentrations in the blood, the expression of key genes regulating intermediary metabolism in the skeletal muscles, and the rate of growth of Japanese Black cattle. All calves were fed a high-fat milk replacer (crude protein, 26%; crude fat, 25.5%; total dissolved nitrogen, 116%). Control calves (n = 4) were nursed with 500 g milk replacer until 3 months of age, whereas calves in the experimental group (n = 4) were nursed with 1800 g milk replacer until 3 months, and then the volume was gradually reduced until 5 months. Body weight was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group at 7 months. Plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the experimental group. Expression of glucose-transporter-4 messenger RNA (mRNA) was lower, whereas that of glucose transporter 1, cluster of differentiation 36, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1b mRNA was significantly higher in the Longissimus thoracis of the experimental group. Nutritional status during early post-natal life appears to strongly influence the growth rate and glucose and lipid metabolism in Japanese Black cattle..
45. Tatsuhiro Uchiwa, Yusuke Takai, Ayako Tashiro, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Exposure of C57BL/6J mice to long photoperiod during early life stages increases body weight and alters plasma metabolomic profiles in adulthood, Physiological Reports, 10.14814/phy2.12974, 4, 18, 2016.09, Perinatal photoperiod is an important regulator of physiological phenotype in adulthood. In this study, we demonstrated that postnatal (0–4�weeks old) exposure of C57BL/6J mice to long photoperiod induced persistent increase in body weight until adulthood, compared with the mice maintained under short photoperiod. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ, a gene involved in fatty acid metabolism, was decreased in 10-week-old mice exposed to long photoperiod during 0–4 or 4–8�weeks of age. Plasma metabolomic profiles of adult mice exposed to a long photoperiod during the postnatal period (0–4 LD) were compared to those in the mice exposed to short photoperiod during the same period. Cluster analysis revealed that both carbon metabolic pathway and nucleic acid pathway were altered by the postnatal photoperiod. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis were significantly upregulated in 0–4 LD, suggesting that the mice in 0–4 LD use the glycolytic pathway for energy expenditure rather than the fatty acid oxidation pathway. In addition, the mice in 0–4 LD exhibited high levels of purine metabolites, which have a role in neuroprotection. In conclusion, postnatal exposure of C57BL/6J mice to long photoperiod induces increase in body weight and various changes in plasma metabolic profiles during adulthood..
46. Hui Yang, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mohammad A. Bahry, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Guofeng Han, Rong Zhang, Hideki Tagashira, Masahito Tsubata, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Chronic oral administration of pine bark extract (flavangenol) attenuates brain and liver mRNA expressions of HSPs in heat-exposed chicks, JOURNAL OF THERMAL BIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.06.014, 60, 140-148, 2016.08, Exposure to a high ambient temperature (HT) can cause heat stress, which has a huge negative impact on physiological functions. Cellular heat-shock response is activated upon exposure to HT for cellular maintenance and adaptation. In addition, antioxidants are used to support physiological functions under HT in a variety of organisms. Flavangenol, an extract of pine bark, is one of the most potent antioxidants with its complex mixture of polyphenols. In the current study, chronic (a single daily oral administration for 14 days) or acute (a single oral administration) oral administration of flavangenol was performed on chicks. Then the chicks were exposed to an acute HT (40 +/- 1 degrees C for 3 h) to examine the effect of flavangenol on the mRNA expression of heat-shock protein (HSP) in the brain and liver. Rectal temperature, plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AAT), a marker of liver damage, and plasma corticosterone as well as metabolites were also determined. HSP-70 and -90 mRNA expression, rectal temperature, plasma AAT and corticosterone were increased by HT. Interestingly, the chronic, but not the acute, administration of flavangenol caused a declining in the diencephalic mRNA expression of HSP-70 and -90 and plasma AAT in HT-exposed chicks. Moreover, the hepatic mRNA expression of HSP-90 was also significantly decreased by chronic oral administration of flavangenol in HT chicks. These results indicate that chronic, but not acute, oral administration of flavangenol attenuates HSP mRNA expression in the central and peripheral tissues due to its possible role in improving cellular protective functions during heat stress. The flavangenol-dependent decline in plasma MT further suggests that liver damage induced by heat stress was minimized by flavangenol. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
47. Hui Yang, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mohammad A. Bahry, Phuong V. Tran, Phong H. Do, Guofeng Han, Rong Zhang, Hideki Tagashira, Masahito Tsubata, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Chronic oral administration of pine bark extract (flavangenol) attenuates brain and liver mRNA expressions of HSPs in heat-exposed chicks, JOURNAL OF THERMAL BIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.06.014, 60, 140-148, 2016.08, Exposure to a high ambient temperature (HT) can cause heat stress, which has a huge negative impact on physiological functions. Cellular heat-shock response is activated upon exposure to HT for cellular maintenance and adaptation. In addition, antioxidants are used to support physiological functions under HT in a variety of organisms. Flavangenol, an extract of pine bark, is one of the most potent antioxidants with its complex mixture of polyphenols. In the current study, chronic (a single daily oral administration for 14 days) or acute (a single oral administration) oral administration of flavangenol was performed on chicks. Then the chicks were exposed to an acute HT (40 +/- 1 degrees C for 3 h) to examine the effect of flavangenol on the mRNA expression of heat-shock protein (HSP) in the brain and liver. Rectal temperature, plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AAT), a marker of liver damage, and plasma corticosterone as well as metabolites were also determined. HSP-70 and -90 mRNA expression, rectal temperature, plasma AAT and corticosterone were increased by HT. Interestingly, the chronic, but not the acute, administration of flavangenol caused a declining in the diencephalic mRNA expression of HSP-70 and -90 and plasma AAT in HT-exposed chicks. Moreover, the hepatic mRNA expression of HSP-90 was also significantly decreased by chronic oral administration of flavangenol in HT chicks. These results indicate that chronic, but not acute, oral administration of flavangenol attenuates HSP mRNA expression in the central and peripheral tissues due to its possible role in improving cellular protective functions during heat stress. The flavangenol-dependent decline in plasma MT further suggests that liver damage induced by heat stress was minimized by flavangenol. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
48. 辰巳隆一, 鈴木貴弘, 大屋雄暉, ド クイ マイコイ, 大坪秀明, 川口舞, アンダーソン ジュディー, 水野谷航, 小宮佑介, チャハラ モクラン, 尾嶋孝一, 澤野祥子, 中村真子, 古瀬充宏, 池内義秀, アレン ロナルド, 巳隆一, 鈴木貴弘, 大屋雄暉, ド クイ マイコイは等しい, Experiments reveal a novel mechanism to regulate myofiber types and its activation by functional food ingredients., 栄養生理研究会報, 60, 2, 69-77, 2016.07.
49. Betty R. McConn, Jiaqing Yi, Elizabeth R. Gilbert, Paul B. Siegel, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Mark A. Cline, Stimulation of food intake after central administration of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone is similar in genetically selected low and high body weight lines of chickens, GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ygcen.2016.01.004, 232, 96-100, 2016.06, Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), first isolated from the brain of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), when centrally administered exerts orexigenic effects in birds. However, the precise mechanisms mediating this effect are poorly understood and limited information is available on this effect in models of body weight dysfunction. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate appetite-associated effects of GnIH in chicks from lines that have been selected for either low or high body weight, and are anorexic or become obese, respectively. Central GnIH injection increased food intake in both lines with a similar magnitude of response. There was no effect on water intake. Hypothalamic GnIH mRNA was greater in the low than high weight lines and was greater in the fasted than fed chicks. GnIH receptor mRNA was similarly expressed in both lines, and was greater in fed than fasted chicks. Thus, although selection for body weight did not alter the effect of GnIH on feeding, fasting increased GnIH mRNA in both lines implying that it is an innate hunger factor. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
50. Phuong V. Tran, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Phong H. Do, Mohammad A. Bahry, Hui Yang, Mitsuhiro Furuse, L-Ornithine is a potential acute satiety signal in the brain of neonatal chicks, PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.12.007, 155, 141-148, 2016.03, Recently, we observed that neonatal chicks exhibit feeding behavior characterized by frequent food intake and short resting intervals, with changes detected in the brain amino acid and monoamine concentrations. In this study, we aimed to clarify further the relationship between the appetite of neonatal chicks and brain amino acid metabolism. In Experiment 1, changes were investigated in free amino acids in the brain under conditions of regulated appetite induced by fasting and subsequent short-term re-feeding. Chicks (5 days old) were distributed into four treatment groups namely, fasting for 3 h, and fasting for 3 h followed by re-feeding for 10, 20 or 30 min. Brain samples were collected after treatment to analyze free amino acid concentrations. Amino adipic acid and proline in all brain parts as well as arginine and ornithine in all brain parts - except mesencephalic arginine and cerebellar ornithine - were increased in a time-dependent manner following re-feeding. In Experiment 2, we further examined the effect of exogenous administration of some amino acids altered in association with feeding behavior in Experiment 1. We chose L-arginine and its functional metabolite, L-ornithine, to analyze their effects on food intake in chicks. Intracerebroventricular injection (2 mu mol) of L-ornithine, but not L-arginine, significantly inhibited food intake in neonatal chicks. In Experiment 3, we found that central injection of L-omithine (2, 4, and 6 mu mol) dose-dependently suppressed food intake in chicks. These results suggested that L-ornithine may have an important role in the control of food intake as an acute satiety signal in the neonatal chick brain. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc All rights reserved..
51. Shinya Takagi, Daichi Oikawa, Hiromi Ikeda, Nozomi Tateiwa, Kazunori Koba, Vishwajit, S. Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, The relationship between liver lipid accumulation and changes in plasma amino acids in mice challenged with carbon tetrachloride., Journal of Animal Research and Nutrition, 1, 12, 1-6, 2016.02.
52. Minaminaka, K., Nagasawa, M., Ikeda, H., Ohtsuka, T., Kawase, T., Tagashira, H., Tsubata, M., Yasuo, S., Furuse, M., Flavangenol attenuates stress responses in mice exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress, Current Topics in Phytochemistry, 13, 43-51, 2016.02.
53. Yumi Ogino, Junki Yoshida, Asako Shigemura, Masakazu Yamanaga, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Central Injection of Glucose Modifies Behavior, Amino Acid and Monoamine Metabolism in Neonatal Chicks under Acute Stressful Conditions, JOURNAL OF POULTRY SCIENCE, 10.2141/jpsa.0150093, 53, 1, 82-92, 2016.01, The effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of a wide range of glucose concentrations on the behavioral response, central amino acid and monoamine contents was investigated in chicks exposed to a social isolation stressful condition. The chicks were given an i.c.v. injection of 0.21, 0.42, 0.84, and 1.68 mu mol of D-glucose, and then behavioral changes were observed over 10 min. The behavioral stress response was dose-dependently decreased and calm behavior was increased by i.c.v. administration of glucose. In the diencephalon, glutamine was positively correlated, whereas glycine was negatively correlated with the dose of glucose. In the telencephalon, the dopamine metabolite and dopamine turnover rates were positively correlated, whereas dopamine was negatively correlated with doses of glucose. In the plasma, isoleucine and hydroxyproline were positively correlated with the dose of glucose, and several amino acids were also influenced by glucose levels.
These results suggest that the possible pathways of the sedative effect of glucose include: (1) amino acids synthesized from injected glucose, which can induce the sedative and/or hypnotic effects; (2) amino acids modified by injected glucose transported in the brain from the peripheral tissues; and (3) injected glucose-induced decreases in brain dopamine levels. In conclusion, these changes induced by central glucose interact and induce the sedative effect in neonatal chicks..
54. Shigemi, K., Tomonaga, S., Uotsu, N., Denbow, D.M., Furuse, M., Oral administration of L-serine modifies amino acid metabolism in the brain of rats, Journal of Animal Nutrition, 1, 3, 2015.12.
55. Dietary protein ingested before and during short photoperiods makes an impact on affect-related behaviours and plasma composition of amino acids in mice..
56. Chowdhury, V.S., Shigemura, A., Erwan, E., Ito, K., Bahry, M.A., Phuong, T.V., Furuse, M., Oral administration of L-citrulline, but not L-arginine or L-ornithine, acts as a hypothermic agent in chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 52, 331-335, 2015.10.
57. Nagasawa M, Ikeda H, Kawase T, Iwamoto A, Yasuo S, Furuse M, Brain research, Suppressed expression of cystathionine β-synthase and smaller cerebellum in Wistar Kyoto rats., 10.1016/j.brainres.2015.07.043, 1624, 208-213, 2015.10, Nagasawa M, Ikeda H, Kawase T, Iwamoto A, Yasuo S, Furuse M, Brain research, 2015, vol. 1624, pp. 208-213, 2015.
58. Taro Ikegami, Akihiro Takemura, Eunjung Choi, Atsushi Suda, Shozo Tomonaga, Muhammad Badruzzaman, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Increase in telencephalic dopamine and cerebellar norepinephrine contents by hydrostatic pressure in goldfish: the possible involvement in hydrostatic pressure-related locomotion, FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, 10.1007/s10695-015-0072-7, 41, 5, 1105-1115, 2015.10, Fish are faced with a wide range of hydrostatic pressure (HP) in their natural habitats. Additionally, freshwater fish are occasionally exposed to rapid changes inHPdue to heavy rainfall, flood and/or dam release. Accordingly, variations in HP are one of the most important environmental cues for fish. However, little information is available on how HP information is perceived and transmitted in the central nervous system of fish. The present study examined the effect of HP (water depth of 1.3 m) on the quantities of monoamines and their metabolites in the telencephalon, optic tectum, diencephalon, cerebellum (including partial mesencephalon) and vagal lobe (including medulla oblongata) of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, using high-performance liquid chromatography. HP affected monoamine and metabolite contents in restricted brain regions, including the telencephalon, cerebellum and vagal lobe. In particular, HP significantly increased the levels of dopamine (DA) in the telencephalon at 15 min and that of norepinephrine (NE) in the cerebellum at 30 min. In addition, HP also significantly increased locomotor activity at 15 and 30 min after HP treatment. It is possible that HP indirectly induces locomotion in goldfish via telencephalic DA and cerebellar NE neuronal activity..
59. Mao Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Chronic imipramine treatment differentially alters the brain and plasma amino acid metabolism in Wistar and Wistar Kyoto rats, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.05.043, 762, 127-135, 2015.09, In the present study, the amino acids which have the possibility for the therapeutic efficacy of imipramine were explored and compared between Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression, and Wistar rats as a normal model. The antidepressant-like effect caused by chronic imipramine treatment was confirmed by decreased immobility in the forced swimming test. Chronic imipramine administration altered the amino acid dynamics in the brain. In the striatum, the concentrations of asparagine, glutamine and methionine were significantly increased by chronic imipramine administration. In the thalamus and hypothalamus, chronic imipramine administration significantly decreased the valine concentration. On the other hand, no amino acid was altered by chronic imipramine administration in the hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum. In addition, lower concentration of asparagine in the prefrontal cortex of WKY rats was improved by chronic imipramine administration. This amelioration only in WKY rats may be a specific effect of chronic imipramine administration under the depressive state. In conclusion, chronic imipramine administration altered the several amino acid dynamics in the brain. Modification of the amino acid metabolism in the brain may provide a new strategy in the development of therapeutic treatment of major depression. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
60. Kentaro Ito, Mohammad A. Bahry, Yang Hui, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2015.04.010, 187, 13-19, 2015.09, Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40 +/- 1 degrees C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 +/- 1 degrees C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc All rights reserved..
61. Misato Kawai, Ryosei Goda, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Ayaka Iwamoto, Nobuo Uotsu, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Antidepressant-like effect of bright light is potentiated by L-serine administration in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder, BRAIN RESEARCH BULLETIN, 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2015.08.010, 118, 25-33, 2015.09, Bright light therapy is used as the primary treatment for seasonal affective disorder; however, the mechanisms underlying its antidepressant effect are not fully understood. Previously, we found that C57BL/6J mice exhibit increased depression-like behavior during a short-day condition (SD) and have lowered brain serotonin (5-HT) content. This study analyzed the effect of bright light on depression-like behaviors and the brain serotonergic system using the C57BL16J mice. In the mice maintained under SD, bright light treatment (1000 lx, daily 1 h exposure) for 1 week reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test and increased intake of saccharin solution in a saccharin intake test. However, the light treatment did not modify 5-HT content and selective 5-HT uptake in the amygdala, or temporal patterns of core body temperature and wheel-running activity throughout a day. In the next experiment, we attempted to enhance the effect of bright light by using L-serine, a precursor of n-serine that acts as an N-methyl-naspartic acid receptor coagonist. Daily subcutaneous injection of L-serine for 2 weeks prior to the bright light strongly reduced the immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting a synergistic effect of light and L-serine. Furthermore, bright light increased the total number of 5-HT-immunoreactive cells and cells that had colocalized 5-HT and c-Fos immunosignals in several subregions of the raphe nuclei. These effects were potentiated by prior injection of L-serine. These data suggest that the bright light may elicit an antidepressant-like effect via enhanced 5-HT signals in the brain and L-serine can enhance these effects. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
62. Do, Mai-Khoi Q., Shimizu, N., Suzuki, T., Otsubo, H., Mizunoya, Y., Nakamura, M., Sawano, S., Furuse, M., Ikeucihi, Y., Anderson, J.E., Tatsumi, R., Transmembrane proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4, receptor candidates for the impact of HGF and FGF2 on semaphorin 3A expression in early-differentiated myoblasts, Physiological Reports, 3, e12553, 2015.09.
63. Mitsuhiro Furuse, Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.06.036, 762, 382-393, 2015.09, The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep.
When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-alpha-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites L-alpha-amino acids, D-amino acid and beta-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans.
In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
64. Shoichiro Funatsu, Takashi Kondoh, Takahiro Kawase, Hiromi Ikeda, Mao Nagasawa, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Long-term consumption of dried bonito dashi (a traditional Japanese fish stock) reduces anxiety and modifies central amino acid levels in rats, NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1179/1476830514Y.0000000124, 18, 6, 256-264, 2015.08, Dried bonito dashi, a traditional Japanese fish stock, enhances palatability of various dishes because of its specific flavor. Daily intake of dashi has also been shown to improve mood status such as tension-anxiety in humans. This study aimed at investigating beneficial effects of dashi ingestion on anxiety/depression-like behaviors and changes in amino acid levels in the brain and plasma in rats. Male Wistar rats were given either dried bonito dashi or water for long-term (29 days; Experiment 1) or single oral administration (Experiment 2). Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were tested using the open field and forced swimming tests, respectively. Concentrations of amino acids were measured in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and jugular vein. During the long-term (29 days) consumption, rats given 2% dashi frequently entered the center zone and spent more time compared with the water controls in the open field test. However, the dashi was ineffective on depression-like behavior. In the hippocampus, concentrations of hydroxyproline, anserine, and valine were increased by dashi while those of asparagine and phenylalanine were decreased. In the hypothalamus, the methionine concentration was decreased. In a single oral administration experiment, the dashi (1%, 2% or 10%) showed no effects on behaviors. Significance was observed only in the concentrations of alpha-aminoadipic acid, cystathionine, and ornithine in the hippocampus. Dried bonito dashi is a functional food having anxiolytic-like effects. Daily ingestion of the dashi, even at lower concentrations found in the cuisine, reduces anxiety and alters amino acid levels in the brain..
65. Tran, P.V., Chowdhury, V.S., Nagasawa, M., Furuse, M., Changes in free amino acid and monoamine concentrations in the chick brain associated with feeding behavior, SpringerPlus, 4, 252, 2015.06.
66. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder..
67. Serotonin levels in the dorsal raphe nuclei of both chipmunks and mice are enhanced by long photoperiod, but brain dopamine level response to photoperiod is species-specific..
68. Effects of time of L-ornithine administration on the diurnal rhythms of plasma growth hormone, melatonin, and corticosterone levels in mice..
69. Yoshida, J., Erwan, E., Chowdhury, V.S., Ogino, Y., Shigemura, A., Denbow, D.M., Furuse, M., Comparison of centrally injected tryptophan related substances with sedation in acute isolation stress-induced neonatal chicks, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 129, 1-6, 2015.02.
70. Ogino Y, Tomonaga S, Yoshida J, Nagasawa M, Furuse M, Central administration of glucose modifies brain amino acid metabolism in neonatal chicks., Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0140014, 52, 1, 28-33, 2015.01.
71. Hiroshi Udo, Kousuke Hamasu, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Hiroyuki Sugiyama, VEGF-induced antidepressant effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems, BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.09.005, 275, 107-113, 2014.12, Throughout life, we are exposed to a variety of stresses, which may be inevitable and noxious sometimes. During evolution, animals must have acquired some physiological means to counteract stress. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic and neurogenic factor, which has been shown to elicit antidepressant-like effects in response to different external stimuli, potentially functioning as an anti-stress molecule. However, it remains largely unknown how VEGF modulates mood-related behaviors. To investigate molecular correlates, we analyzed monoaminergic systems of VEGF transgenic mice that display antidepressant-like behavior. Immunostaining showed that overall morphologies of monoaminergic nuclei and their processes were normal. However, we found imbalances in brain monoamine contents, in which the levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, but not dopamine, were decreased exclusively in the regions where VEGF was expressed. The turnover of norepinephrine showed a marked increase and serotonin turnover showed a modest reduction, whereas dopamine turnover was not affected. The protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of catecholamine and serotonin synthesis, remained constant. The mRNA levels of monoamine receptors were generally similar but adrenergic receptors of ADR alpha 1A and ADR beta 1 were down-regulated. Behavioral tests showed that serotonin- or norepinephrine-selective antidepressant drugs failed to additively enhance antidepressant-like behaviors, whereas monoamine depleting drugs attenuated VEGF-mediated antidepressant-like effect. These data suggest that VEGF-induced antidepressant-like effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
72. Betty McConn, Guoqing Wang, Jiaqing Yi, Elizabeth R. Gilbert, Tomohiro Osugi, Takayoshi Ubuka, Kazuyoshi Tsutsui, Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Mark A. Cline, Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone-stimulation of food intake is mediated by hypothalamic effects in chicks, NEUROPEPTIDES, 10.1016/j.npep.2014.09.001, 48, 6, 327-334, 2014.12, Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnlH), a 12 amino acid peptide, is expressed in the avian brain and inhibits luteinizing hormone secretion. Additionally, exogenous injection of GnIH causes increased food intake of chicks although the central mechanism mediating this response is poorly understood. Hence, the purpose of our study was to elucidate the central mechanism of the GnIH orexigenic response using 12 day post hatch layer-type chicks as models. Firstly, via mass spectrometry we deduced the chicken GnIH amino acid sequence: SIRPSAYLPLRFamide. Following this we used chicken GnIH to demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 2.6 and 7.8 nmol causes increased food intake up to 150 min following injection with no effect on water intake. The number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells was quantified in appetite-associated hypothalamic nuclei following ICV GnIH and only the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) had an increase of c-Fos positive neurons. From whole hypothalamus samples following ICV GnIH injection abundance of several appetite-associated mRNA was quantified which demonstrated that mRNA for neuropeptide Y (NPY) was increased while mRNA for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was decreased. This was not the case for mRNA abundance in isolated LHA where NPY and POMC were not affected but melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA was increased. A comprehensive behavior analysis was conducted after ICV GnIH injection which demonstrated a variety of behaviors unrelated to appetite were affected. In sum, these results implicate activation of the LHA in the GnIH orexigenic response and NPY, POMC and MCH are likely also involved. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd..
73. Shohei Sakaguchi, Jun-ichi Shono, Takahiro Suzuki, Shoko Sawano, Judy E. Anderson, Mai-Khoi Q. Do, Hideaki Ohtsubo, Wataru Mizunoya, Yusuke Sato, Mako Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Koji Yamada, Yoshihide Ikeuchi, Ryuichi Tatsumi, Implication of anti-inflammatory macrophages in regenerative moto-neuritogenesis: Promotion of myoblast migration and neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A expression in injured muscle, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.biocel.2014.05.032, 54, 272-285, 2014.09, Regenerative mechanisms that regulate intramuscular motor innervation are thought to reside in the spatiotemporal expression of axon-guidance molecules. Our previous studies proposed a heretofore unexplored role of resident myogenic stem cell (satellite cell)-derived myoblasts as a key presenter of a secreted neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A (Sema3A); hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) triggered its expression exclusively at the early-differentiation phase. In order to verify this concept, the present study was designed to clarify a paracrine source of HGF release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that activated anti-inflammatory macrophages (CD206-positive M2) produce HGF and thereby promote myoblast chemoattraction and Sema3A expression. Media from pro-inflammatory macrophage cultures (M1) did not show any significant effect. M2 also enhanced the expression of myoblast-differentiation markers in culture, and infiltrated predominantly at the early-differentiation phase (3-5 days post-injury); M2 were confirmed to produce HGF as monitored by in vivo/ex vivo immunocytochemistiy of CD11b/CD206/HGF-positive cells and by HGF in situ hybridization of cardiotoxin- or crush-injured tibialis anterior muscle, respectively. These studies advance our understanding of the stage-specific activation of Sema3A expression signaling. Findings, therefore, encourage the idea that M2 contribute to spatiotemporal up-regulation of extracellular Sema3A concentrations by producing HGF that, in turn, stimulates a burst of Sema3A secretion by myoblasts that are recruited to site of injury. This model may ensure a coordinated delay in re-attachment of motoneuron terminals onto damaged fibers early in muscle regeneration, and thus synchronize the recovery of muscle-fiber integrity and the early resolution of inflammation after injury. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
74. K. Ito, E. Erwan, M. Nagasawa, M. Furuse, V. S. Chowdhury, Changes in free amino acid concentrations in the blood, brain and muscle of heat-exposed chicks, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 10.1080/00071668.2014.957653, 55, 5, 644-652, 2014.09, 1. An experiment was conducted to analyse the changes in free amino acid concentrations in the blood, brain and muscle of chicks in response to 15 or 30min exposure to high ambient temperature (HT).
2. Food intake and body weight were not affected, while rectal temperature was significantly increased by short-term HT exposure.
3. Several free amino acid concentrations increased in the blood, brain and muscle even with short-term HT, whereas levels of a few amino acids declined significantly. As well as the nonessential amino acids, essential amino acids also significantly increased with exposure to HT.
4. 3-Methylhistidine, a marker of proteolysis, significantly declined in the muscle of HT chicks, implying a reduction of protein breakdown under HT.
5. These results indicate that alteration of protein metabolism may occur in chicks even with short-term heat exposure..
75. Edi Erwan, Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Mao Nagasawa, Ryosei Goda, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Central injection of L- and D-aspartate attenuates isolation-induced stress behavior in chicks possibly through different mechanisms, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2014.04.042, 736, 138-142, 2014.08, Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of L- and D-aspartate (L- and D-Asp) has been shown to have a sedative effect with and without a hypnotic effect, respectively, in neonatal chicks experiencing isolation stress. However, the mechanisms of the different stress-attenuating functions of L- and D-Asp have not yet been fully clarified. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in order to reveal the receptor-mediated function of L- and D-Asp. To reveal whether L-and D-Asp act through the NMDA receptor, (+)-MK-801, which is an antagonist of NMDA receptors, was used in the current study. In experiment 1, the chicks were injected i.c.v. with either saline, (+)-MK-801, L-Asp or L-Asp plus (+)-MK-801. The sedative and hypnotic effects induced by L-Asp were blocked by co-administration with (+)-MK-801. In experiment 2, the chicks were injected i.c.v. with either saline, (+)-MK-801, D-Asp or D-Asp plus (+)-MK-801. Importantly, the sedative effects induced by D-Asp were shifted to hypnotic effects by co-administration with (+)-MK-801. Taken together, L-Asp could induce sedative and hypnotic effects for stress behaviors through the NMDA receptor, but the attenuation of stress behaviors by D-Asp might be via simultaneous involvement of other receptors besides the NMDA receptor in this process. These differences may explain the different functional mechanisms of L- and D-Asp in the central nervous system. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
76. Mao Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Yumi Ogino, Junki Yoshida, Shozo Tomonaga, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats, ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, 10.1017/neu.2013.56, 26, 4, 209-217, 2014.08, Objective: Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression.
Methods: In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected.
Results: Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment.
Conclusion: This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression..
77. Edi Erwan, Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Mao Nagasawa, Ryosei Goda, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Oral administration of D-aspartate, but not L-aspartate, depresses rectal temperature and alters plasma metabolites in chicks, LIFE SCIENCES, 10.1016/j.lfs.2014.05.015, 109, 1, 65-71, 2014.07, Aims: L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and D-aspartate CD-Asp) are physiologically important amino acids in mammals and birds. However, the functions of these amino acids have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we therefore examined the effects of L-Asp and D-Asp in terms of regulating body temperature, plasma metabolites and cat-echolamines in chicks.
Main methods: Chicks were first orally administered with different doses (0, 3.75, 7.5 and 15 mmol/kg body weight) of L- or D-Asp to monitor the effects of these amino acids on rectal temperature during 120 mm of the experimental period.
Key findings: oral administration of D-Asp, but not of L-Asp, linearly decreased the rectal temperature in chicks. Importantly, orally administered D-Asp led to a significant reduction in body temperature in chicks even under high ambient temperature (HT) conditions. However, centrally administered D-Asp did not significantly influence the body temperature in chicks. As for plasma metabolites and catecholamines, orally administered D-Asp led to decreased triacylglycerol and uric acid concentrations and increased glucose and chlorine concentrations but did not alter plasma catecholamines.
Significance: These results suggest that oral administration of D-Asp may play a potent role in reducing body temperature under both normal and HT conditions. The alteration of plasma metabolites further indicates that D-Asp may contribute to the regulation of metabolic activity in chicks. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
78. Hiromi Ikeda, Takahiro Kawase, Mao Nagasawa, Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Shinobu Yasuo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Metabolism of amino acids differs in the brains of Djungarian hamster (P-sungorus) and Roborovskii hamster (P-roborovskii), SPRINGERPLUS, 10.1186/2193-1801-3-277, 3, 277, 2014.06, Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) and Roborovskii hamster (P. roborovskii) belong to the same genus of phodopus. Roborovskii hamster shows high locomotor activity and low level of dopamine (DA) in the brain. Administration of L-tyrosine, a precursor of DA, decreases locomotor activity in Roborovskii hamsters. However, the amino acid metabolism in relation to the hyperactivity is not yet well known. In the present study, L- and D-amino acid concentrations in the brain, liver, and plasma in Djungarian and Roborovskii hamsters were investigated during day and night times to explain the possible difference in hyperactivity between them. Most of the examined amino acids were higher in the night time when hamsters are active compared to those in day time. L- and D-tyrosine concentrations were higher in the liver of Roborovskii hamsters than in Djungarian hamsters. Furthermore, brain concentration of D-tyrosine was higher in the Roborovskii than in Djungarian hamsters, but no significant difference was observed for L-tyrosine concentrations between the two species. These results suggest that the conversion of L-tyrosine to D-tyrosine in the brain of Roborovskii hamster may be higher than in Djungarian hamster, which may cause low DA concentration and hyperactivity in Roborovskii hamster. On the other hand, L- and D-serine, which are known as sedative factors, were lower in Roborovskii hamsters than Djungarian hamster. These results suggest that species-specific regulation in amino acid metabolism may contribute to hyperactivity in Roborovskii hamsters..
79. Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Shozo Tomonaga, Taro Ikegami, Edi Erwan, Kentaro Ito, John F. Cockrem, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Oxidative damage and brain concentrations of free amino acid in chicks exposed to high ambient temperature, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.12.020, 169, 70-76, 2014.03, High ambient temperatures (HT) reduce food intake and body weight in young chickens, and HT can cause increased expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides. The mechanisms by which HT act, and the effects of HT on cellular homeostasis in the brain, are however not well understood. In the current study lipid peroxidation and amino acid metabolism were measured in the brains of 14 d old chicks exposed to HT (35 degrees C for 24- or 48-h) or to control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 degrees C). Malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured in the brain to determine the degree of oxidative damage. HT increased body temperature and reduced food intake and body weight gain. HT also increased diencephalic oxidative damage after 48 h, and altered some free amino acid concentrations in the diencephalon. Diencephalic MDA concentrations were increased by HT and time, with the effect of HT more prominent with increasing time. HT altered cystathionine, serine, tyrosine and isoleucine concentrations. Cystathionine was lower in HT birds compared with CT birds at 24 h, whilst serine, tyrosine and isoleucine were higher at 48 h in HT birds. An increase in oxidative damage and alterations in amino acid concentrations in the diencephalon may contribute to the physiological, behavioral and thermoregulatory responses of heat-exposed chicks. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
80. Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Misato Kawai, Yuki Togo, Ryosei Goda, Takahiro Kawase, Haruka Matsuo, Ayaka Iwamoto, Mao Nagasawa, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Photoperiodic responses of depression-like behavior, the brain serotonergic system, and peripheral metabolism in laboratory mice, PSYCHONEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.10.013, 40, 37-47, 2014.02, Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by depression during specific seasons, generally winter. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying SAD remain elusive due to a limited number of animal models with high availability and validity. Here we show that laboratory C57BL/6J mice display photoperiodic changes in depression-like behavior and brain serotonin content. C57BL/6J mice maintained under short-day conditions, as compared to those under long-day conditions, demonstrated prolonged immobility times in the forced swimming test with lower brain levels of serotonin and its precursor L-tryptophan. Furthermore, photoperiod altered multiple parameters reflective of peripheral metabolism, including the ratio of plasma Ltryptophan to the sum of other large neutral amino acids that compete for transport across the blood brain barrier, responses of circulating glucose and insulin to glucose load, sucrose intake under restricted feeding condition, and sensitivity of the brain serotonergic system to peripherally administered glucose. These data suggest that the mechanisms underlying SAD involve the brain peripheral tissue network, and C57BL/6J mice can serve as a powerful tool for investigating the link between seasons and mood. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
81. Iwamoto, A., Kawai, M., Furuse, M., Yasuo, S., Effects of chronic jet lag on the central and peripheral circadian clocks in CBA/N mice, Chronobiology International, 31, 2, 189-198, 2014.02.
82. Masakazu Yamanaga, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Preference and Passage through the Gastrointestinal Tract of Paddy Rice in Young Chicks, JOURNAL OF POULTRY SCIENCE, 10.2141/jpsa.0130058, 51, 1, 47-51, 2014.01, Rice grain for feed has been used for chicken feed as a substitute for corn, since the nutritive values of corn and rice are similar. However, it is unclear whether rice grain for feed should be available for young chicks from the early stages of ages. It was reported that the preference for unpolished rice was low, but no information was available for paddy rice (PR) which is low in digestibility. In the present study, therefore, preference for PR and the passage of feed through the gastrointestinal tract were investigated. In order to improve this preference, the effect of mixing PR with a practical diet was compared with early learning for adapting to PR. In addition, it was confirmed that the passage rate of PR is improved by the addition of grit, an enzyme or lysine. As a result, replacing 60% of a practical diet with PR was found to significantly increase intake of feed in comparison with the practical diet alone. The preference for PR was very clear irrespective of whether early learning for adapting to PR occurred just after hatching or not. The addition of an enzyme improved the passage of feed through the whole gastrointestinal tract, although the addition of grit and lysine did not affect it. On the other hand, the passage of feed from the crop was not improved by any treatments. In conclusion, mixing PR and the practical diet improved feed intake and the passage of feed through the gastrointestinal tract was improved by adding enzymes in young chicks..
83. Erwan, E., Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Furuse, M., Lauroyl-L-aspartate decreased food intake and body temperature in neonatal chicks, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior,, 113, 7-11, 2013.11.
84. Shono, J.-I., Sakaguchi, S., Suzuki, T., Mai-Khoi Q, Do, Mizunoya, Y., Nakamura, M., Sato, Y., Furuse, M., Yamada, K., Ikeucihi, Y., Tatsumi, R., Preliminary time-course study of antiinflammatory macrophage infiltration in crush-injured skeletal muscle, Animal Science Journal, 84, 11, 744-750, 2013.11.
85. Takagi, S., Ikeda, H., Kawase, T., Nagasawa, M., Vishwajit Sur Chowdhury, Yasuo, S., Furuse, M., Orally administered L-tyrosine, but not D-tyrosine, shortly enters into several regions of the mouse brain, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 16, 2, 67-72, 2013.10.
86. J. Yoshida, A. Shigemura, Y. Ogino, D. M. Denbow, M. Furuse, TWO RECEPTORS ARE INVOLVED IN THE CENTRAL FUNCTIONS OF KYNURENIC ACID UNDER AN ACUTE STRESS IN NEONATAL CHICKS, NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.06.005, 248, 194-200, 2013.09, Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of kynurenic acid (KYNA) had sedative and hypnotic effects during stress in neonatal chicks. However, its mechanism has not been clarified. KYNA is an endogenous antagonist of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine (alpha 7nACh) receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Therefore, this study clarified the mechanism of sedative and hypnotic effects of KYNA in the brain during an acute stress. In Experiment 1, to investigate the relationship between KYNA and the a7nACh receptor, KYNA was injected i.c.v. with galantamine, an agonist of the allosteric potentiating site of the alpha ACh receptor. Galantamine did not attenuate the effect of KYNA, but higher levels of galantamine caused harmful effects. In Experiment 2, the role of the NMDA receptor was investigated using the NMDA receptor antagonist ( +)-MK-801, D-serine which has high affinity to a co-agonist glycine site at the NMDA receptors, NMDA as the NMDA receptor agonist, and 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (QUIN), an agonist of the NMDA receptor subgroup containing the sub-units NR2A and NR2B. The behavioral changes following KYNA were partially attenuated by QUIN alone. In conclusion, we suggest that KYNA functioned via the simultaneous inhibition of the a7nACh receptor and NMDA receptor subgroup containing the sub-units NR2A and NR2B. (C) 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
87. Mariko Goto, Haruka Matsuo, Masayuki Iigo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Horst-Werner Korf, Shinobu Yasuo, Melatonin-induced changes in the expression of thyroid hormone-converting enzymes in hypothalamus depend on the timing of melatonin injections and genetic background in mice, GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ygcen.2013.02.028, 186, 33-40, 2013.06, Recent studies have identified TSHB, Dio2, and Dio3 as key genes for the photoperiodic regulation of gonads. In mammals, the expression of these genes is controlled by melatonin. Surprisingly, this effect of melatonin was shown to be conserved in several reproductively non-photoperiodic laboratory mouse strains that have thus become a valuable model to decipher the mechanisms through which melatonin controls the expression of TSHB, Dio2, and Dio3. In this study, we assessed the effects of intraperitoneal melatonin injections and of their timing on the expression of TSHB, TSHR, Dio2, and Dio3 in the hypothalamo-hypophysial systems of melatonin-proficient CBA/N and melatonin-deficient C57BL/6J mice kept under long-day conditions. In CBA/N mice, Dio3 expression was induced by a daily melatonin injection at ZT14 only, whereas in C57BL/6J mice, a daily melatonin injection induced Dio3 expression at all time points investigated (IFS, 14, and 20) without changes in TSHB expression in both strains. Dio2 expression was suppressed by a daily melatonin injection only in C57BL/6J mice and only at ZT8. Effect of a daily melatonin injection on TSHR expression was strain- and region- specific. Melatonin levels elevated in plasma and hypothalamus after intraperitoneal injections of melatonin at ZT8 for 7 days in C57BL/6J returned to basal levels within 1 h after the final injection, while in CBA/N mice melatonin levels in hypothalamus remained high for at least 1 h. These data suggest that Dio2 and Dio3 expression in the hypothalamus is differentially regulated by the timing of melatonin injections through strain-specific mechanisms. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
88. Rebekah I. Webster, Brandon A. Newmyer, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Elizabeth R. Gilbert, Mark A. Cline, The orexigenic effect of kyotorphin in chicks involves hypothalamus and brainstem activity and opioid receptors, NEUROPEPTIDES, 10.1016/j.npep.2012.10.007, 47, 3, 193-198, 2013.06, Kyotorphin (KTP), first isolated in the bovine brain and now having been identified in a variety of species, is known most extensively for its analgesic-like properties. KTP indirectly stimulates opioid receptors by releasing methionine enkephalin (met-enkephalin). Stimulation of opioid receptors is linked to hunger perception. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the effect of KTP on food intake in the neonatal chick. Intracerebroventricular injection of 0.6, 3.0 and 12 nmol KTP increased feeding up to 60 min post-injection. KTP treated chicks increased pecking efficiency and decreased time spent in deep rest, 20 and 30 min following injection, respectively. Gastrointestinal transit rate was not affected by KTP. Blocking mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors suppressed orexigenic effects of ICTP, suggesting that all three types are involved in KTP's stimulatory effect. The lateral hypothalamus (LH) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), within the brainstem had increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells following KTP treatment. In conclusion, KTP caused increased feeding in broiler-type chicks, likely through activation of the LH, ARC, and NTS. Published by Elsevier Ltd..
89. Erwan E, Tomonaga S, Ohmori T, Mutaguchi Y, Ohshima T, Nagasawa M, Yasuo S, Tamura Y, Furuse M, Oral administration of D-aspartate, but not of L-aspartate, reduces food intake in chicks., Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0120116, 50, 2, 165-171, 2013.04.
90. Akimoto, Y., Yasuo, S., Furuse, M., L-DOPA suppressed scratching behavior and modified brain monoamine/amino acid concentrations in mice, Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, 10, 3, 195-203, 2013.03.
91. Suzuki, T., Mai-Khoi Q, Do, Sato, Y., Ojima, K., Hara, M., Mizunoya, Y., Nakamura, M., Furuse, M., Ikeucihi, Y., Andersen, J.E., Tatsumi, R., Comparative analysis of semaphorin 3A in soleus and EDL muscle satellite cells in vitro toward understanding its role in modulating myogenin expression, International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 45, 2, 476-482, 2013.02.
92. Sato, Y., Mai-Khoi Q, Do, Suzuki, T., Otsubo, H., Mizunoya, Y., Nakamura, M., Furuse, M., Ikeucihi, Y., Tatsumi, R., Satellite cells produce neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A upon muscle injury, Animal Science Journal, 84, 2, 185-189, 2013.02.
93. Yamada S, Tomonaga S, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Intracerebroventricular injection of pyrithiamine on short-term memory and habituation learning in mice., Current Topics in Nutraceutical Research, 11, 1/2, 47-54, 2013.02.
94. Nishino R, Mikami K, Takahashi H, Tomonaga S, Furuse M, Hiramoto T, Aiba Y, Koga Y, Sudo N, Commensal microbiota modulate murine behaviors in a strictly contamination-free environment confirmed by culture-based methods., Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 10.1111/nmo.12110, 25, 6, 521-528, 2013.01.
95. Nagasawa, M., Murakami, T., Tomonaga, S., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimitsu, F. and Furuse, M., Impacts of acute imipramine treatment on plasma and brain amino acid metabolism in mice given graded levels of dietary chicken protein, Animal Science Journal, 83, 12, 777-787, 2012.12.
96. Erwan, E., Tomonaga, S., Yoshida, J., Nagasawa, M., Ogino, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of L- and D-aspartate attenuates social isolation induced stress behaviors in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 43, 5, 1969-1976, 2012.11.
97. Nagasawa, M., Ogino, Y., Kurata, K., Otsuka, T., Yoshida, J., Tomonaga, S. and Furuse, M., Hypothesis with abnormal amino acid metabolism in depression and stress vulnerability in Wistar Kyoto rats, Amino Acids, 43, 5, 2101-2111, 2012.11.
98. Erwan, E., Tomonaga, S., Yoshida, J., Nagasawa, M., Ogino, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of L- and D-aspartate attenuates social isolation induced stress behaviors in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 43, 5, 1969-1976, 2012.11.
99. Nagasawa, M., Murakami, T., Tomonaga, S. and Furuse, M., The impact of chronic imipramine treatment on amino acid concentrations in the hippocampus of mice, Nutritional Neuroscience, 15, 5, 217-224, 2012.10.
100. Tomonaga S, Matsumoto M, Furuse M, β-Alanine enhances brain and muscle carnosine levels in broiler chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.0110165, 49, 4, 308-312, 2012.10.
101. 山長聖和, 古瀬充宏, ニワトリヒナにおける飼料用玄米の摂食調節に関する研究, 日本家禽学会誌, 49, J2, J39-J43, 2012.10.
102. Yoshida J, Tomonaga S, Ogino Y, Nagasawa M, Kurata K, Furuse M, Intracerebroventricular injection of kynurenic acid attenuates corticotrophin-releasing hormone-augmented stress responses in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience, 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2012.06.041, 220, 142-148, 2012.09.
103. Tomonaga S, Yamasaki I, Nagasawa M, Ogino Y, Uotsu N, Teramoto S, Furuse M, Oral administration of L-serine increases L- and D-serine levels in the plasma and brain of fasted rats, Letters in Drug Design and Discovery, 10.2174/157018012801319436, 9, 7, 663-667, 2012.09.
104. Yuki Togo, Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Mariko Goto, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Photoperiod regulates dietary preferences and energy metabolism in young developing Fischer 344 rats but not in same-age Wistar rats, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM, 10.1152/ajpendo.00209.2012, 303, 6, E777-E786, 2012.09, Togo Y, Otsuka T, Goto M, Furuse M, Yasuo S. Photoperiod regulates dietary preferences and energy metabolism in young developing Fischer 344 rats but not in same-age Wistar rats. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 303: E777-E786, 2012. First published July 17, 2012; doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00209.2012.-The effects of photoperiod on dietary preference were examined using young growing Fischer 344 and Wistar rats, which are seasonal and nonseasonal breeders, respectively. Rats were provided a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet (LFD: 66/10/24% energy as carbohydrate/fat/protein) and high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HFD: 21/55/24% energy as carbohydrate/fat/protein) simultaneously under long- (LD: 16 h light/day) and shortday (SD: 8 h light/day) conditions for 3 wk. Fischer 344 rats preferred the LFD to the HFD under the LD condition, whereas preference for both diets was equivalent under the SD condition. Consequently, their body weight and total energy intake exhibited 11-15 and 10-13% increases, respectively, under the LD condition. Calculation of energy intake from macronutrients revealed that rats under the LD condition consumed 20-24 and 9-13% higher energy of carbohydrates and proteins, respectively, than those under the SD condition. In contrast, Wistar rats preferred the LFD to the HFD irrespective of photoperiod and exhibited no photoperiodic changes in any parameters examined. Next, Fischer 344 rats were provided either the LFD or HFD for 3 wk under LD or SD conditions. Calorie intake was 10% higher in the rats fed the LFD than those fed the HFD under SD condition. However, rats under LD condition exhibited 5-10, 14, and 64% increases in body weight, epididymal fat mass, and plasma leptin levels, respectively, compared with those under the SD condition irrespective of dietary composition. In conclusion, photoperiod regulates feeding and energy metabolism in young growing Fischer 344 rats via the interactions with dietary macronutrient composition..
105. Mao Nagasawa, Tatsuro Murakami, Shozo Tomonaga, Mitsuhiro Furuse, The impact of chronic imipramine treatment on amino acid concentrations in the hippocampus of mice, NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1179/1476830512Y.0000000015, 15, 5, 26-33, 2012.09, The relationship between antidepressants and monoamine concentrations in the brain has been well investigated, but few studies have investigated the relationship between antidepressants and amino acid concentrations in the brain. The purpose of the present study was therefore to investigate the effect of the chronic antidepressant imipramine on amino acid and monoamine concentrations in the mouse brain and plasma. Chronic imipramine treatment decreased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleaceticacid/5-hydroxytryptamine in the cerebral cortex and increased that of norepinephrine (NE) in the hippocampus. Since these changes were conspicuous effects of the antidepressant, we concluded that imipramine acts on the central nervous system. No change in amino acid concentrations in plasma was induced by chronic imipramine treatment, but several changes were confirmed in the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. Chronic imipramine treatment caused increases in L-methionine, L-tyrosine, and L-lysine in the cerebral cortex, and an increase in L-aspartate in the hypothalamus. Contrary to this, the concentrations of L-aspartate, L-serine, L-asparagine, glycine, L-glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, L-threonine, L-arginine, L-proline, L-valine, and L-methionine in the hippocampus were decreased by chronic imipramine treatment. The present results demonstrate that the metabolism of several amino acids in the brain, but not of those in plasma, was altered by chronic imipramine treatment. The findings in the present study may help to further elucidate the relationship between amino acids and the effects and side effects of antidepressants..
106. Hamasu K, Kabuki Y, Tomonaga S, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Changes in brain monoamine metabolism of neonatal chicks under two different acute stress conditions., British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071668.2012.662271, 53, 1, 145-149, 2012.07.
107. Vishwajit S. Chowdhury, Shozo Tomonaga, Shotaro Nishimura, Shoji Tabata, John F. Cockrem, Kazuyoshi Tsutsui, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Hypothalamic gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone precursor mRNA is increased during depressed food intake in heat-exposed chicks, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.03.009, 162, 3, 227-233, 2012.07, The regulation of food intake in chickens (Gallus gallus dornesticus) represents a complex homeostatic mechanism involving multiple levels of control, and regulation during high ambient temperatures (HT) is poorly understood. In this study, we examined hypothalamic mRNA expression of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) to understand the effect of HT on an orexigenic neuropeptide. We examined the effects of HT (35 degrees C ambient temperature for 1, 24 or 48 h) on 14-day old chicks. HT significantly increased rectal temperature and suppressed food intake, and also influenced plasma metabolites. The expression of GnIH precursor mRNA in the diencephalon was significantly increased in chicks at 24-and 48 h of HT when food intake was suppressed significantly, whilst no change was observed for GnIH precursor mRNA and food intake at 1 h of HT. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry further revealed the cellular localization of chicken GnIH precursor mRNA and its peptide in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the chick hypothalamus. We examined plasma metabolites in chicks exposed to HT for 1 or 48 h and found that triacylglycerol concentration was significantly higher in HT than control chicks at 1 h. Total protein, uric acid and calcium were significantly lower in HT chicks than control chicks at 48 h. These results indicate that not only a reduction in food intake and alteration in plasma metabolites but also the PVN-specific expression of GnIH, an orexigenic agent, may be induced by HT. The reduced food intake at the same time as GnIH expression was increased during HT suggests that HT-induced GnIH expression may oppose HT-induced feeding suppression, rather than promote it. We suggest that the increased GnIH expression could be a consequence of the reduced food intake, and would not be a direct response to HT. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..
108. Tomonaga S, Kawabata F, Yoshida J, Ogino Y, Tsuji T, Furuse M, Alaska pollack protein Decreases brain 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol levels in fasting chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.011143, 49, 3, 171-177, 2012.07.
109. Chowdhury VS, Tomonaga S, Nishimura S, Tabata S, Furuse M, Physiological and behavioral responses of young chicks to high ambient temperature, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.011071, 49, 3, 212-218, 2012.07.
110. Nagasawa, M., Murakami, T., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimitsu, F. and Furuse, M., Dietary animal proteins alter monoamine metabolism in the brain, Animal Science Journal, 83, 6, 493-498, 2012.06.
111. Otsuka, T., Goto, M., Kawai, M., Togo, Y., Sato, K., Katoh, K., Furuse, M. and Yasuo, S. , Photoperiod regulates corticosterone rhythms by altered adrenal sensitivity through melatonin-independent mechanisms in rodents, PLoS One, 7, 6, e39090, 2012.06.
112. Tsuyoshi Otsuka, Mariko Goto, Misato Kawai, Yuki Togo, Katsuyoshi Sato, Kazuo Katoh, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shinobu Yasuo, Photoperiod Regulates Corticosterone Rhythms by Altered Adrenal Sensitivity via Melatonin-Independent Mechanisms in Fischer 344 Rats and C57BL/6J Mice, PLOS ONE, 10.1371/journal.pone.0039090, 7, 6, e39090, 2012.06, Most species living in temperate zones adapt their physiology and behavior to seasonal changes in the environment by using the photoperiod as a primary cue. The mechanisms underlying photoperiodic regulation of stress-related functions are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the effects of photoperiod on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in photoperiod-sensitive Fischer 344 rats. We first examined how photoperiod affects diurnal variations in plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone. ACTH levels did not exhibit diurnal variations under long-and short-day conditions. On the other hand, corticosterone levels exhibited a clear rhythm under short-day condition with a peak during dark phase. This peak was not observed under long-day condition in which a significant rhythm was not detected. To analyze the mechanisms responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of corticosterone rhythms, ACTH was intraperitoneally injected at the onset of the light or dark phase in dexamethasone-treated rats maintained under long-and short-day conditions. ACTH induced higher corticosterone levels in rats examined at dark onset under short-day condition than those maintained under long-day condition. Next, we asked whether melatonin signals are involved in photoperiodic regulation of corticosterone rhythms, and rats were intraperitoneally injected with melatonin at late afternoon under long-day condition for 3 weeks. However, melatonin injections did not affect the corticosterone rhythms. In addition, photoperiodic changes in the amplitude of corticosterone rhythms were also observed in melatonin-deficient C57BL/6J mice, in which expression profiles of several clock genes and steroidgenesis genes in adrenal gland were modified by the photoperiod. Our data suggest that photoperiod regulates corticosterone rhythms by altered adrenal sensitivity through melatonin-independent mechanisms that may involve the adrenal clock..
113. Koji Kurata, Mao Nagasawa, Shozo Tomonaga, Mami Aoki, Saori Akiduki, Koji Morishita, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally administered L-ornithine reduces restraint stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice, NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 10.1016/j.neulet.2011.11.024, 506, 2, 287-291, 2012.01, In a previous study, we confirmed that orally administered L-ornithine can be transported into the brain of mice. In addition, orally administered L-ornithine, within a limited dose range, had an anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze test. However, the mechanism by which orally administered L-ornithine reduced the stress response in mice is still unclear. Experiment 1 determined whether orally administered L-ornithine could reduce the stress-induced activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Mice were orally administered L-ornithine (0, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 mmo1/10 ml/kg, p.o.), and restrained for 30 min from 30 min post administration. There was a significant decrease in the corticosterone levels in the group receiving 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine compared to the control group. In Experiment 2, the effect of orally administered L-ornithine (0 and 0.75 mmo1/10 ml/kg, p.o.) on endogenous monoamine release was investigated using in vivo microdialysis. Only the monoamines metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovallinic acids (HVA) were detected in the present study. Dialysate concentrations of 5-HIM, DOPAC and HVA were not significantly changed immediately after administration of L-ornithine and restraint stress. In conclusion, changes of corticosterone concentrations by orally administered L-ornithine were not related to alterations in brain monoamine metabolisms. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved..
114. Yoriko Akimoto, Mitsuhiro Furuse, SCH23390, a dopamine D-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed scratching behavior induced by compound 48/80 in mice, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2011.09.011, 670, 1, 162-167, 2011.11, To clarify the mechanisms by which compound 48/80 (C48/80) induces scratching behavior, the involvement of dopamine D-1 receptors was investigated. The intracisternal (i.t.) administration of SCH23390 (1.0 mu g), a selective dopamine D-1 receptor antagonist, significantly decreased C48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. These results suggest that dopamine D-1 receptors contribute to scratching behavior or the itch sensation induced by subcutaneous injection of C48/80 in mice. Co-administration of SCH23390 and C48/80 enhanced c-fos immunoreactivities in the peduncular part of the lateral hypothalamus (PLH), whereas the immunoreactivities in the other groups were unchanged. The dopaminergic system may be playing an important role in the suppression of C48/80-induced scratching behavior by SCH23390. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
115. Koji Kurata, Mao Nagasawa, Shozo Tomonaga, Mami Aoki, Koji Morishita, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally administered L-ornithine elevates brain L-ornithine levels and has an anxiolytic-like effect in mice, NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000018, 14, 6, 243-248, 2011.11, Intracerebroventricular injection of L-ornithine has demonstrated sedative and hypnotic effects in neonatal chicks exposed to acute stressful conditions. However, whether orally administered L-ornithine can reduce acute mental stress remains to be defined. To clarify the nutritional importance of L-ornithine in controlling the stress response, in Experiment 1 we first investigated whether orally administered L-ornithine can be transported into the brain of mice. Mice were orally administered L-ornithine (3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os). L-Ornithine levels were significantly elevated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 30 and 60 minutes post-administration. In Experiment 2, the effect of orally administered L-ornithine (0, 0.1875, 0.75 and 3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os) on anxiety-like behavior in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze test was examined at 30 minutes post-administration. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time spent and entries in the open arms in the group receiving 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine compared to the control group. Furthermore, locomotion activity in a novel environment was not significantly changed between the control group and 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine group in Experiment 3. Therefore, it appears that orally administrated L-ornithine is bioavailable to the rodent brain and reduces anxiety-like behavior as demonstrated by the elevated plus-maze test..
116. Koji Kurata, Mao Nagasawa, Shozo Tomonaga, Mami Aoki, Koji Morishita, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Orally administered L-ornithine elevates brain L-ornithine levels and has an anxiolytic-like effect in mice, NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000018, 14, 6, 243-248, 2011.11, Intracerebroventricular injection of L-ornithine has demonstrated sedative and hypnotic effects in neonatal chicks exposed to acute stressful conditions. However, whether orally administered L-ornithine can reduce acute mental stress remains to be defined. To clarify the nutritional importance of L-ornithine in controlling the stress response, in Experiment 1 we first investigated whether orally administered L-ornithine can be transported into the brain of mice. Mice were orally administered L-ornithine (3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os). L-Ornithine levels were significantly elevated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 30 and 60 minutes post-administration. In Experiment 2, the effect of orally administered L-ornithine (0, 0.1875, 0.75 and 3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os) on anxiety-like behavior in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze test was examined at 30 minutes post-administration. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time spent and entries in the open arms in the group receiving 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine compared to the control group. Furthermore, locomotion activity in a novel environment was not significantly changed between the control group and 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine group in Experiment 3. Therefore, it appears that orally administrated L-ornithine is bioavailable to the rodent brain and reduces anxiety-like behavior as demonstrated by the elevated plus-maze test..
117. Yoriko Akimoto, Mitsuhiro Furuse, SCH23390, a dopamine D-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed scratching behavior induced by compound 48/80 in mice, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2011.09.011, 670, 1, 162-167, 2011.11, To clarify the mechanisms by which compound 48/80 (C48/80) induces scratching behavior, the involvement of dopamine D-1 receptors was investigated. The intracisternal (i.t.) administration of SCH23390 (1.0 mu g), a selective dopamine D-1 receptor antagonist, significantly decreased C48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. These results suggest that dopamine D-1 receptors contribute to scratching behavior or the itch sensation induced by subcutaneous injection of C48/80 in mice. Co-administration of SCH23390 and C48/80 enhanced c-fos immunoreactivities in the peduncular part of the lateral hypothalamus (PLH), whereas the immunoreactivities in the other groups were unchanged. The dopaminergic system may be playing an important role in the suppression of C48/80-induced scratching behavior by SCH23390. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..
118. Yamada S, Oikawa D, Tomonaga S, Furuse M, Neurochemical and behavioral effects of excessive glucose intake in thiamine-deficient mice., Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 10.11266/jpan.14.1, 14, 1, 1-12, 2011.04.
119. Sachiko Katayama, Kazutaka Shigemi, Mark A. Cline, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Clorgyline Inhibits Orexin-A-Induced Arousal in Layer-Type Chicks, JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCE, 10.1292/jvms.10-0358, 73, 4, 471-474, 2011.04, We previously demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of orexin-A induces arousal and increased metabolic turnover rates of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in layer (egg-type) chicks. Because monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) is a potent degrading enzyme of these rnonoamines, we hypothesized that orexin-A may mediate its arousal-inducing effects through MAO-A. Therefore, we simultaneously injected clorgyline, a specific inhibitor of MAO-A, with orexin-A and examined behavior of chicks. Behaviors associated with arousal were attenuated in the group of chicks that received clorgyline and orexin-A compared with those that received orexin-A alone. For the monoamine turnover rate, enhancement of the turnover rate of serotonin by orexin-A was attenuated by clorgyline. Therefore, we conclude that orexin-A-induced arousal is dependent upon monoamine neural activities stimulated by MAO-A in chicks..
120. Sachiko Katayama, Kazutaka Shigemi, Mark A. Cline, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Clorgyline Inhibits Orexin-A-Induced Arousal in Layer-Type Chicks, JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCE, 10.1292/jvms.10-0358, 73, 4, 471-474, 2011.04, We previously demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of orexin-A induces arousal and increased metabolic turnover rates of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in layer (egg-type) chicks. Because monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) is a potent degrading enzyme of these rnonoamines, we hypothesized that orexin-A may mediate its arousal-inducing effects through MAO-A. Therefore, we simultaneously injected clorgyline, a specific inhibitor of MAO-A, with orexin-A and examined behavior of chicks. Behaviors associated with arousal were attenuated in the group of chicks that received clorgyline and orexin-A compared with those that received orexin-A alone. For the monoamine turnover rate, enhancement of the turnover rate of serotonin by orexin-A was attenuated by clorgyline. Therefore, we conclude that orexin-A-induced arousal is dependent upon monoamine neural activities stimulated by MAO-A in chicks..
121. K. Kurata, K. Shigemi, S. Tomonaga, M. Aoki, K. Morishita, D. M. Denbow, M. Furuse, L-ORNITHINE ATTENUATES CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR-INDUCED STRESS RESPONSES ACTING AT GABA(A) RECEPTORS IN NEONATAL CHICKS, NEUROSCIENCE, 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2010.10.076, 172, 226-231, 2011.01, I.c.v. injection of L-ornithine has been shown to have sedative and hypnotic effects on neonatal chicks exposed to acute stressful conditions. To clarify the mechanism, we conducted three experiments under strengthened stressful conditions with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). In Experiment 1, the effect of i.c.v. injection of CRF, L-ornithine (0.5 mu mol) or CRF with L-ornithine on the stressful response of chicks was investigated. Compared with the vehicle control, CRF increased distress vocalizations and the time spent in active wakefulness. L-Ornithine increased the time spent in sleeping posture, even following stimulation with CRF. In Experiment 2, dose-dependent effects of L-ornithine were investigated using i.c.v. administration with vehicle, CRF alone or CRF plus L-ornithine (0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 mu mol). L-Ornithine decreased the CRF-stimulated distress vocalizations in a dose-dependent manner. In Experiment 3, the chicks were injected i.c.v. with either CRF, CRF plus L-ornithine (0.5 mu mol), CRF plus the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin or L-ornithine with picrotoxin. The sedative and hypnotic effects induced by L-ornithine were blocked with co-administration of picrotoxin. These results suggest that L-ornithine could attenuate CRF-stimulated stress behaviors acting at GABA(A) receptors. (C) 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..
122. Yusuke Kabuki, Kazutaka Shigemi, Kousuke Hamasu, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Chronic L-tyrosine alters the locomotor activity and brain monoamine levels in Roborovskii hamsters, NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 10.1016/j.neulet.2010.10.077, 488, 1, 45-48, 2011.01, The Roborovskii hamster (Phodopus roborovskii) has high locomotor activity (hyperactivity) and low dopamine levels in the brain compared with the congeneric Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). To clarify the efficacy of dietary L-tyrosine in ameliorating signs of hyperactivity, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of L-tyrosine, the primary precursor of dopamine, on locomotor activity and brain monoamine levels in Roborovskii hamsters. Chronic supplementation of L-tyrosine had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field, but did decrease locomotor activity in the home cage. Tyrosine increased dopamine and norepinephrine turnover rates and decreased in serotonin turnover rate in the brain. These findings suggest that long-term feeding of L-tyrosine may be effective in ameliorating signs of hyperactivity. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved..
123. Yusuke Kabuki, Kazutaka Shigemi, Kousuke Hamasu, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Chronic L-tyrosine alters the locomotor activity and brain monoamine levels in Roborovskii hamsters, NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 10.1016/j.neulet.2010.10.077, 488, 1, 45-48, 2011.01, The Roborovskii hamster (Phodopus roborovskii) has high locomotor activity (hyperactivity) and low dopamine levels in the brain compared with the congeneric Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). To clarify the efficacy of dietary L-tyrosine in ameliorating signs of hyperactivity, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of L-tyrosine, the primary precursor of dopamine, on locomotor activity and brain monoamine levels in Roborovskii hamsters. Chronic supplementation of L-tyrosine had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field, but did decrease locomotor activity in the home cage. Tyrosine increased dopamine and norepinephrine turnover rates and decreased in serotonin turnover rate in the brain. These findings suggest that long-term feeding of L-tyrosine may be effective in ameliorating signs of hyperactivity. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved..
124. Oikawa, D., Akimoto, Y., Mizobe, Y., Tsuyama, S. and Furuse, M., Functions of CLA and ARA for prevention of CCl4-induced fatty liver in mice, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 9, 22, 2854-2858, 2010.11.
125. Katayama, S., Hamasu, K., Shigemi, K., Cline, M.A. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of orexin-A, but not orexin-B, induces arousal of layer-type neonatal chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 157, 2, 132-135, 2010.10.
126. Katayama, S., Shigemi, K., Cline, M.A. and Furuse, M. , Intracerebroventricular injection of orexin-A stimulates monoamine metabolism but not HPA axis in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 484, 2, 157-161, 2010.10.
127. Murakami, T. and Furuse, M., The impact of taurine- and beta-alanine-supplemented diets on behavioual and neurochemical parameters in mice: antidepressant versus anxiolytic-like effects, Amino Acids, 39, 2, 427 - 434, 2010.07.
128. Katayama, S., Tomonaga, S., Sato, M., Yamane, H., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Norepinephrine does not alter NPY and POMC mRNA expression in neonatal chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 156, 1, 143-146, 2010.05.
129. High concentrations of HGF inhibit skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation in vitro by inducing expression of myostatin: a possible mechanism for reestablishing satellite cell quiescence in vivo..
130. Kurauchi, I., Shigemi, K., Kabuki, Y., Hamasu, K., Yamane, H., Aoki, M., Kawada, Y., Morishita, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central L-ornithine, but not polyamines, induces a hypnotic effect in neonatal chicks under acute stress, Nutritional Neuroscience, 13(1):17-20, 2010.02.
131. Shigemi, K., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Yamada, S., Kabuki, Y., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Oral administration of L-serine reduces the locomotor activity of socially isolated rats, Neuroscience Letters, 468(1):75-79, 2010.01.
132. Cline, M.A., Layne, J.E., Calchary, W.A., Sheely, R.R., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., LPLRFamide causes anorexigenic effects in broiler chicks and Bobwhite quail, General and Comparative Endocrinology, 165(2):315-320, 2010.01.
133. Hamasu, K., Shigemi, K., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Yamane, H., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of L-proline and D-proline induces sedative and hypnotic effects by different mechanisms under an acute stressful condition in chicks, Amino Acids, 38(1):57-64, 2010.01.
134. Kabuki, Y., Mizobe, Y., Yamada, S. and Furuse, M., Dietary L-tyrosine alleviates the behavioral alterations induced by social isolation stress in mice, Brain Research Bulletin, 80(6):389-396, 2009.12.
135. I. Kurauchi, K. Shigemi, S. Yamada, M. Aoki, Y. Kawada, K. Morishita, D. M. Denbow, M. Furuse, Comparison of Central Effects of L-Ornithine Metabolites on the Stress Responses of Neonatal Chicks, JOURNAL OF ANIMAL AND VETERINARY ADVANCES, 8, 12, 2580-2584, 8(12):2580-2584, 2009.12, Recently, we observed that central administration of L-arginine attenuated the stress responses of neonatal chicks by inducing a sedative and hypnotic effect. In addition, L-ornithine, which is produced from L-arginine in the brain, appeared to interact with L-arginine during a stress response. Several putative metabolites from L-ornithine, including L-citrulline and D-ornithine, were therefore investigated in the present study. The effects of intracerebroventricular injection of L-ornithine, L-citrulline and D-ornithine were compared in chicks under an isolation-induced stress. L-ornithine greatly attenuated the stress response and induced sedative and hypnotic effects. D-ornithine weakly attenuated the stress responses, while L-citrulline had no effect..
136. Mizobe, Y., Oikawa, D., Akimoto, Y., Tsuyama, S., Onitsuka, E., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimatsu, F. and Furuse, M. , Ingestion of elastin peptides alters messenger RNA expression in mice skin, Current Topics in Nutraceutical Research, 7(3/4):127-130, 2009.11.
137. 石井有理・萬治愛子・速水耕介・大野智弘・塚本昭次郎・磯部英二・古瀬充宏・森山達哉, ケールがアルコール代謝に及ぼす効果について-フラッシャーを対象とした臨床研究およびマイクロアレイを用いた探索的基礎研究-, 日本臨床栄養学会誌, 30(4):321-329, 2009.11.
138. Murai, A., Furuse, M., Kitaguchi, K., Kusumoto, K., Nakanishi, Y., Kobayashi, M. and Horio, F., Characterization of critical factors influencing gene expression of two types of fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP and Lb-FABP) in the liver of birds, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 154(2):216-223, 2009.10.
139. Yamane, H., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., N-Methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors involved in the induction of sedative effects under an acute stress in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 37(4):733-739, 2009.10.
140. Kabuki, Y., Yamane, H., Shigemi, K., Hamasu, K. and Furuse, M., Single L-tyrosine administration alters brain monoamine levels in Roborovskii hamsters, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 12(2):69-74, 2009.10.
141. H. Yamane, Y. Tsuneyoshi, D. M. Denbow, M. Furuse, Erratum: N-Methyl-d-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazolepropionate receptors involved in the induction of sedative effects under an acute stress in neonatal chicks (Amino Acids (2009) DOI:10.1007/s00726-008-0203-x), Amino Acids, 10.1007/s00726-009-0282-3, 37, 4, 767, 2009.10.
142. I. Kurauchi, K. Hamasu, D. M. Denbow, M. Furuse, Plasma Amino Acid Concentration in Neonatal Chicks Modified by Acute Stress, JOURNAL OF ANIMAL AND VETERINARY ADVANCES, 8, 9, 1838-1841, 8(9):1838-1841, 2009.09, To clarify the influence of acute stress on plasma amino acid concentrations, chicks were exposed to either restraint with isolation stress or fasting stress. In restraint with isolation-induced stress, plasma L-hydroxyproline, L-serine, L-asparagine, P-alanine, L-alanine, L-histidine, L-arginine, L-proline, L-methionine, L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-ornithine decreased compared with the control. During fasting stress, L-asparagine, P-alanine, L-histidine, GABA, L-threonine, L-arginine, L-proline, L-methionine, L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-ornithine linearly decreased while, tryptophan increased. Most of the amino acids modified in both acute stresses have been recognized to have a role in sedation and/or hypnosis. Amino acids quickly metabolized during acute stress should be supplemented before and/or after stressful conditions to support chicken health..
143. Tomonaga S, Sato M, Takahata Y, Morimatsu F, Furuse M, Oral administration of chicken breast extract activates serotonin metabolism in the hippocampus of rats., Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 8, 11, 2276-2279, 8(11):2276-2279, 2009.09.
144. Momoka Sato, Mitsuhiro Furuse, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase Inhibitor Retards Chicken Embryonic Growth, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 36, 1, 7-11, 36(1):7-11, 2009.09, In order to clarify the mechanism by which liver cholesterol content is elevated during chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) embryonic development, fertilized eggs were administrated pravastatin in ovo, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) inhibitor, at embryonic day 14 (E14). Embryonic growth and hepatic lipid content were determined at embryonic day 18 (E18). Embryonic growth was retarded by pravastatin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hepatic total cholesterol, triacylglycerol and phospholipid contents were decreased with increased pravastatin. These results suggest that higher hepatic cholesterol was associated with HMG-CoA reductase activity and embryonic growth was affected by cholesterol synthesis..
145. Hamasu, K., Shigemi, K., Kabuki, Y., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central L-proline attenuates stress-induced dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the chick forebrain, Neuroscience Letters, 460(1):78-81, 2009.08.
146. Tsuyama, S., Oikawa, D., Tsuji, Y., Akimoto, Y., Jikuya, H. and Furuse, M., Dietary conjugated linoleic acid modifies the brain endocannabinoid system in mice, Nutritional Neuroscience, 12(4):155-159, 2009.08.
147. Tsuneyoshi, Y., Sato, M., Yamane, H., Tomonaga, S., Morishita, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Oral administration of Excitin-1 (β-alanyl-L-leucine) alters behaviors and brain monoamine and amino acid concentrations in rats, Nutritional Neuroscience, 12(4):175-182, 2009.08.
148. Yamane, H., Asechi, M., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central L-cysteine induces sleep, and D-cysteine induces sleep and abnormal behavior during acute stress in neonatal chicks, Animal Science Journal, 80(4):428-432, 2009.08.
149. Sato M, Tomonaga S, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Changes in carnosine and its related constituents during embryonic development in the breast muscle of layer and broiler chickens, Journal of Poultry Science, 10.2141/jpsa.46.229, 46, 3, 229-233, 46(3):229-233, 2009.07.
150. Hamasu, K., Haraguchi, T., Kabuki, Y., Adachi, N., Tomonaga, S., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., L-Proline is a sedative regulator of acute stress in the brain of neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 37(2):377-382, 2009.07.
151. Hamasu, K., Shigemi, K., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Cholinergic neurotransmission is not involved in sedation induced by L-proline in neonatal chicks, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 8(6):1207-1211, 2009.06.
152. Haruka Yamane, Mari Asechi, Yousuke Tsuneyoshi, Isao Kurauchi, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Intracerebroventricular injection of L-aspartic acid and L-asparagine induces sedative effects under an acute stressful condition in neonatal chicks, ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2009.00625.x, 80, 3, 286-290, 80(3):286-290, 2009.06, The present study was conducted to clarify the central functions of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-asparagine (Asn) during an acute stressful condition in chicks. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Asp and Asn (0.84 mu mol) attenuated the vocalization that normally occurs during social separation stress. Asp decreased the time spent in active wakefulness and induced sedation. Asn had a similar effect to Asp, although somewhat weaker. However, i.c.v. injection of Asp and Asn further enhanced plasma corticosterone release under social separation stress. Taken together, the i.c.v. injection of Asp and Asn has sedative effects under an acute stressful condition, which does not involve the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis..
153. Yamane H, Tomonaga S, Tsuneyoshi Y, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Reduced glutathione decreases energy expenditure in chicks exposed to separation stress, Animal Science Journal, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2009.00626.x, 80, 3, 291-295, 80(3):291-295, 2009.06.
154. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Behavioral responses of neonatal chicks exposed to low environmental temperature, Poultry Science, 88(5):917-922, 2009.05.
155. Sato, M., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Sato, K. and Furuse, M., Comparison of 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase activity between broiler and layer chickens during embryonic development, Research Journal of Biological Sciences, 4(5):585-587, 2009.05.
156. Oikawa, D., Tsuyama, S., Akimoto, Y., Mizobe, Y. and Furuse, M., Arachidonic acid prevents fatty liver induced by conjugated linoleic acid in mice, British Journal of Nutrition, 101(10):1558-1563, 2009.05.
157. Kabuki, Y., Shigemi, K., Hamasu, K. and Furuse, M., L-DOPA attenuates hyperactivity of Roborovskii hamsters, Behavioural Pharmacology, 20(3):260-264, 2009.05.
158. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Oxidative damage in different tissues of neonatal chicks exposed to low environmental temperature, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 152(4):604-608, 2009.04.
159. Sato, M., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Changes in free amino acids in the brain during embryonic development in layer and broiler chickens, Amino Acids, 36(2):303-308, 2009.02.
160. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Putative neuroprotective role of centrally administered corticotropin-releasing factor in low-temperature exposed neonatal chicks, Neuroscience, 158(4):1571-1576, 2009.02.
161. Murakami, T., Yamane, H., Tomonaga, S. and Furuse, M., Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice, European Journal of Pharmacology, 602(1):73-77, 2009.01.
162. Kurauchi, I., Yamane, H., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Central L-alanine reduces energy expenditure with a hypnotic effect under an acute stressful condition in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 36(1):131–135, 2009.01.
163. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor induces tissue specific oxidative damage in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 151(4):664-669, 2008.12.
164. Mizobe, Y., Oikawa, D., Tsuyama, S., Akimoto, Y., Hamasu, K., Onitsuka, E., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimatsu, F. and Furuse, M., mRNA Expression of Lysyl Oxidase and Matrix Metalloproteinase-12 in mouse skin, Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 72:, 2008.11.
165. Shigemi, K., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Hamasu, K., Han, L., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., L-Serine induces sedative-hypnotic effects via GABAA receptor in neonatal chicks, European Journal of Pharmacology, 599(1-3):86-90, 2008.11.
166. Kabuki, Y., Yamane, H., Hamasu, K. and Furuse, M., Different locomotor activities and monoamine levels in the brain of Djungarian hamsters (D. sungorus) and Roborovskii hamsters (D. roborovskii), Experimental Animals, 57(5):447-452, 2008.10.
167. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Thermogenesis in neonatal chicks exposed to acute cold stress with or without intracerebroventricular administration of corticotropin-releasing factor, FEBS Letters, 582(20):3052-3060, 2008.09.
168. Mujahid, A. and Furuse, M., Central administration of corticotrophin-releasing factor induces thermogenesis by changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience, 155(3):845-851, 2008.08.
169. Sato, M., Sato, K. and Furuse, M. , Change in hepatic and plasma bile acid contents and its regulatory gene expression in the chicken embryo, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 150(3):344-347, 2008.07.
170. Akimoto, Y., Oikawa, D., Tsuyama, S. and Furuse, M. , Itch-specific C-fibers were not destroyed by neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 7(7):780-783, 2008.07.
171. Akimoto, Y., Oikawa, D. and Furuse, M. , Scratching and wriggling behaviors induced by compound 48/80 in neonatal rats, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 7(7):793-795, 2008.07.
172. Tomonaga, S., Yamane, H., Onitsuka, E., Yamada, S., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimatsu, F. and Furuse, M. , Carnosine-induced antidepressant-like activity in rats, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 89(4):627-632, 2008.06.
173. Suenaga, R., Yamane, H., Tomonaga, S., Asechi, M., Adachi, N., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Kurauchi, I., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central L-arginine reduced stress responses are mediated by L-ornithine in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 35(1):107-113, 2008.06.
174. Suenaga, R., Tomonaga, S., Yamane, H., Kurauchi, I., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Intracerebroventricular injection of L-arginine induces sedative and hypnotic effects under an acute stress in neonatal chicks, Amino Acids, 35(1):139-146, 2008.06.
175. Tsuneyoshi, Y., Yamane, H., Tomonaga, S., Morishita, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Reverse structure of carnosine induced sedative and hypnotic effects in the chick under acute stress, Life Sciences, 82(21-22):1065-1069, 2008.05.
176. Oikawa, D., Ando, H., Mishiro, K., Miyake, K. and Furuse, M. , Dietary hydroxyproline improves collagen contents of the fillet in tiger puffer (Takifugu rubripes)
, Journal of Fisheries International, 3(2):49-51, 2008.03.
177. Asechi, M., Kurauchi, I., Tomonaga, S., Yamane, H., Suenaga, R., Tsuneyoshi, Y., Denbow, D.M. Furuse, M. , Relationships between the sedative and hypnotic effects of intracerebroventricular administration of L-serine and its metabolites, pyruvate and the derivative amino acids contents in the neonatal chicks under acute stressful conditions, Amino Acids, 34(1):55-60, 2008.01.
178. Tsuneyoshi, Y., Tomonaga, S., Yamane, H., Morishita, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Central administration of L-Ser-L-His and L-Ile-L-His induced sedative effects under an acute stressful condition in chicks, Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, 5(1):65-68, 2008.01.
179. Momoka Sato, Kenji Noda, Katsutoshi Kino, Akihiro Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Comparison of heat production and plasma lipid metabolites between meat- and egg-types of Nagoya breed chicken during embryonic development, ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2007.00482.x, 78, 6, 613-618, 78(6):613-618, 2007.12, We compared heat production (HP) and plasma lipid metabolites between meat- and egg-types of Nagoya breed chickens during embryonic development. To investigate HP and respiratory quotient, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured using an open-circuit calorimeter system. HP was significantly lower in meat- than in egg-type chickens during embryonic development, and HP gradually decreased with developmental stage in both types. The respiratory quotient was constant at approximately 0.68 at every embryonic stage investigated, and the value was similar in both types. Plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acid, glycerol and D-3-hydroxybutyrate, which are associated with lipid metabolism, were similar in both types during embryonic development. These results demonstrate that chicken embryos selected for rapid growth of Nagoya breed have characteristic lower HP, and that when selecting chickens for rapid growth, HP is an important parameter during embryonic stages..
180. Yamane H, Tomonaga S, Suenaga R, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Intracerebroventricular injection of glutathione suppresses food intake of neonatal chicks., Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 6, 11, 1247-1249, 6 (11): 1247-1249, 2007.11.
181. Haraguchi, T., Tomonaga, S., Kurauchi, I., Hamasu, K., Sato, H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of L-proline modifies food intake in neonatal chicks, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 6 (11): 1255-1257, 2007.11.
182. Tachibana, T., Oikawa, D., Adachi, N., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Central administration of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone changes lipid metabolism in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 148(2):408-412, 2007.10.
183. Tomonaga S, Noda K, Suenaga R, Asechi M, Adachi N, Kino K, Nakamura A, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Stress responses in neonatal meat and layer Nagoya chicks, Animal Science Journal, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2007.00474.x, 78, 5, 541-545, 78(5):541-545, 2007.10.
184. Sato, M., Tachibana, T., Tsukada, A. and Furuse, M. , Plasma prolactin and corticosterone concentrations are comaparable during embryonic development, but greatly enhance in layer than in broiler chickens at hatch, Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 6(8):923-926, 2007.08.
185. Adachi, N., Choi, Y.-H., Suenaga, R., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Green tea component, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, but not L-theanine, has sedative effects in chick under acute stress conditions, Current Topics in Nutraceutical Research, 5(2/3):107-110, 2007.08.
186. M. Sato, T. Tachibana, A. Tsukada, M. Furuse, Plasma prolactin and corticosterone concentrations are changing toward hatch with a different manner between layer- and broiler-type chickens, JOURNAL OF ANIMAL AND VETERINARY ADVANCES, 6, 8, 923-926, 2007.08, Plasma Prolactin (PRL) and Corticosterone (CORT) concentrations in broiler- and layer-type chickens were compared during embryonic development (14 and 18 days of incubation (E14 and E18)) and at hatch (P0). Plasma PRL concentrations were comparable and kept low in both types during embryonic development, but the value sharply increased at P0 with special reference to layers. Plasma CORT concentrations were similar and gradually increased toward P0 in both types and the values in layers were higher than in broilers at P0. The results obtained here suggest that plasma PRL and CORT concentrations were influenced by genetic selection just after hatching, but not during embryonic development..
187. Tsuneyoshi, Y., Tomonaga, S., Asechi, M., Morishita, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of dipeptides, β-alanyl-BCAAs, induces hyperactivity in chicks, BMC Neuroscience, 8:37, 2007.06.
188. Tomonaga, S., Hayakawa, T., Yamane, H., Maemura, H., Sato, M., Takahata, Y., Morimatsu, F. and Furuse, M., Oral administration of chicken breast extract increases brain carnosine and anserine concentrations in rats, Nutritional Neuroscience, 10(3/4):181–186, 2007.06.
189. Yamane, H., Tomonaga, S., Suenaga, R., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M. , Intracerebroventricular injection of glutathione and its derivative induces sedative and hypnotic effects under an acute stress in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 418(1): 87-91, 2007.05.
190. Yamane, H., Suenaga, R., Han, L., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of glutathione related dipeptides induces sedative and hypnotic effect under an acute stress in neonatal chicks , Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, 4(5):368-372, 2007.05.
191. Oikawa, D., Yamasaki, Y., Tsuyama, S. and Furuse, M. , The skin LTB4 content of mothers and their offsprings administered with CLA or LA in mice, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 10(1): 1-7, 2007.04.
192. Tachibana, T., Oikawa, D., Adachi, N., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Central administration of vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating
polypeptide differently regulates energy metabolism in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, 147(1):156-164, 2007.04.
193. Tachibana, T., Oikawa, D., Takahashi, H., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., The anorexic effect of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone is mediated by corticotrophin-releasing factor in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, 147(1):173-178, 2007.04.
194. Tachibana, T., Oikawa, D., Adachi, N., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide-1 changes lipid metabolism in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 147(4):1104-1108, 2007.04.
195. Isao Kurauchi, Mari Asechi, Tetsuya Tachibana, Li Han, Kohsuke Hayamizu, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Intracerebroventricular injection of tryptophan, but not lysine or methionine, induces sedative effect during an acute stressful condition in neonatal chicks, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 31, 1, 25-28, ,31(1): 25-28, 2007.03, To elucidate the central effect of three essential amino acids viz. tryptophan, methionine and lysine on stress responses, each amino acid (0.8 mu mol) or saline was administered i.c.v. just before exposure to social separation stress. The social separation stress increased spontaneous activity and vocalization of chicks, but these responses were attenuated by the i.c.v. injection of tryptophan, but not methionine or lysine. In conclusion, centrally administered tryptophan may be effective in attenuating anxiety induced by a psychological stressor..
196. Takagi S, Tomonaga S, Ito S, Oshima Y, Honjo T, Furuse M, Effects of in utero TPTCL exposure on the learned behaviors of mice after birth., Journal of Applied Animal Research, 10.1080/09712119.2007.9706621, 31, 1, 13-20, 31(1): 13-20, 2007.03.
197. Kaiya, H., Saito, E.-S., Tachibana, T., Furuse, M. and Kangawa, K., Changes in ghrelin levels of plasma and proventriculus and ghrelin mRNA of proventriculus in fasted and refed layer chicks, Domestic Animal Endocrinology, 32(4):247-259, 2007.03.
198. Adachi, N., Tomonaga, S., Suenaga, R., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Galloyl group is not necessary for a sedative effect of catechin through GABAergic system, Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, 4(3):163-167, 2007.03.
199. Tsuyama, S., Oikawa, D., Yamasaki, Y., Takagi, S., Ando, H. and Furuse, M. , Effect of orally administered arachidonic acid on the expression of endocannabinoid synthetic and catabolic enzyme mRNA in the mouse brain, Nutritional Neuroscience, 10(1-2): 45-50, 2007.02.
200. Nakayama, K., Oshima, Y., Tachibana, T., Furuse, M. and Honjo, T. , Alteration of monoamine concentrations in the brain of medaka, Oryzias latipes, exposed to tributyltin, Environmental Toxicology, 22(1):53-57, 2007.01.
201. Momoka Sato, Tetsuya Tachibana, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Total lipid and triacylglycerol contents in the liver of broiler and layer chickens at embryonic stages and hatching, ANIMAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2006.00381.x, 77, 5, 526-531, 77(5):526-531, 2006.10, To compare the hepatic function of broiler and layer chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) at various embryonic stages and hatching, the total lipid and triacylglycerol (TG) content were determined. The chicken embryos accumulated a large amount of lipids in the liver and the total lipid content gradually increased toward hatching, though no significant difference was observed between broilers and layers. The TG contents in the liver increased considerably with developmental stage. At embryonic day 14 the TG content in the liver was similar between broilers and layers; thereafter, it was 1.3 and 2.2 times higher in broilers than in layers at embryonic day 18 and for newly hatched chicks, respectively. Chick embryos accumulate an excessive amount of cholesterol ester in the liver, but cholesterol ester is replaced by TG after hatching. The results of hepatic TG contents in the present study suggest that the development of the hepatic function between broilers and layers may already differ at embryonic stages..
202. Tachibana, T., Kaiya, H., Denbow, D.M., Kangawa, K. and Furuse, M., Central ghrelin acts as an anti-dipsogenic peptide in chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 405(3):241-245, 2006.09.
203. Tachibana, T., Sato, M., Oikawa, D., Takahashi, H., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of neuropeptide Y modifies carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in chicks, Regulatory Peptides, 136(1-3):1-8, 2006.09.
204. Emoto F, Tomonaga S, Tachibana T, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Effect of centrally administered sphingomyelin on food intake and HPA axis of chicks., Journal of Applied Animal Research, 10.1080/09712119.2006.9706579, 29, 2, 91-96, 29(2):91-96, 2006.06.
205. Asechi, M., Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T., Han, L., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of L-serine analogs and derivatives induces sedative and hypnotic effects under an acute stressful condition in neonatal chicks, Behavioural Brain Research, 170(1):71-77., 2006.06.
206. Tachibana, T., Takahashi, H., Oikawa, D., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Thyrotropin-releasing hormone increased heat production without the involvement of corticotropin-releasing factor in neonatal chicks, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 83(4): 528-532, 2006.04.
207. Tomonaga S, Kaneko K, Kaji Y, Kido Y, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Dietary β-alanine enhances brain, but not muscle, carnosine and anserine concentrations in broilers, Animal Science Journal, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2006.00323.x, 77, 1, 79-86, 77(1):79-86, 2006.02.
208. Kurauchi, I., Asechi, M., Tachibana, T., Han, L., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of L-alanine induces a sedative effect under an acute stressful condition in neonatal chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 43(4):384-387, 2006.01.
209. Yamasaki, Y., Oikawa, D., Asechi, M., Tsuyama, S. and Furuse, M., Effects of oral administration of L-serine on the inhibition of compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior and on the concentration of ceramides in the epidermis in mice, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 9(2):67-75, 2006.01.
210. Zhang, D.M., Yoshimatsu, T. and Furuse, M., The endogenous presence of L-carnitine in live foods used for larviculture, Aquaculture, 255(1-4):272-278, 2006.01.
211. Sato, M., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., Heat production and lipid metabolism in broiler and layer chickens during embryonic development, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 143(3):382-388, 2006.01.
212. Tachibana, T., Sato, M., Oikawa, D. and Furuse, M., Involvement of CRF on the anorexic effect of GLP-1 in layer chicks., Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 143(1):112-117, 2006.01.
213. Adachi, N., Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate attenuates acute stress responses through GABAergic system in the brain, European Journal of Pharmacology, 531(1-3):171-175, 2006.01.
214. Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T., Takahashi, H., Sato, M., Denbow , D.M. and Furuse, M., Nitric oxide involves in carnosine induced hyperactivity in chicks, European Journal of Pharmacology, 10.1016/j.ejphar.2005.09.008, 524, 1-3, 84-88, 524(1-3):84-88, 2005.10.
215. T Takagi, YH Choi, T Tachibana, DM Denbow, M Furuse, Effect of intracerebroventricular injection of L-pipecolic acid on GABA concentrations in brain sites of neonatal chicks, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 28, 1, 9-13, 28(1):9-13, 2005.09, L-pipecolic acid (L-PA) is a major metabolic intermediate of L-lysine in the mammalian and chicken brain, which enhances gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) release and inhibits GABA re-uptake. Our previous study showed that intracerebrouentricular (i.c.v.) injection of L-PA suppressed feeding and induced sleep-like behavior in neonatal chicks. These behaviors which are associated with the GABA system, suggest a link between L-PA and GABA. The present study was designed to determine GABA concentrations in several chick brain sites after i.c.v. injection of L-PA. Unexpectedly, L-PA tended to decrease GABA concentrations in all brain sites tested except for the pons-medulla oblongata and the decrease was largest in the optic lobe. These results, taken together with previous findings, support a link between i.c.v. L-PA and extracellular GABA concentrations..
216. Saito, S., Tachibana, T., Choi, Y.-H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., ICV CRF and isolation differentially enhance plasma corticosterone concentrations in layer- and meat-type neonatal chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 10.1016/j.cbpb.2005.05.054, 141, 3, 305-309, 141(3):305-309, 2005.09.
217. Oikawa, D., Nakanishi, T., Nakamura, Y., Yamamoto, T., Yamaguchi, A., Shiba, N., Iwamoto, H., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., Modification of skin composition by CLA alone or with combination of other fatty acids in mice, British Journal of Nutrition, 10.1079/BJN20051488, 94, 2, 275-281, 94(2):275-281, 2005.08.
218. Tomonaga S, Kaji Y, Tachibana T, Denbow DM, Furuse M, Oral administration of β-alanine modifies carnosine concentrations in the muscles and brains of chickens., Animal Science Journal, 10.1111/j.1740-0929.2005.00263.x, 76, 3, 249-254, 76(3):249-254, 2005.06.
219. Oikawa, D., Hirakawa, H., Hayamizu, K., Nakamura, Y., Shiba, N., Nakanishi, T., Iwamoto, H., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., Dietary Garcinia cambogia does not modify skin properties of mice with or without excessive sucrose intake, Phytotherapy Research, 10.1002/ptr.1618, 19, 4, 294-297, 19(4):294-297, 2005.04.
220. Tachibana, T., Tsukada, A., Fujimoto, M., Takahashi, H., Ohkubo, T., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Comparison of mammalian prolactin-releasing peptide and Carassius RFamide for feeding behavior and prolactin secretion in chicks, General and Comparative Endocrinology, 10.1016/j.ygcen.2005.06.012, 144, 3, 264-269, 144(3):264-269, 2005.01.
221. Saito, S., Tachibana, T., Choi, Y.-H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., ICV melatonin reduces acute stress responses in neonatal chicks, Behavioural Brain Research, 10.1016/j.bbr.2005.06.045, 165, 2, 197-203, 165(2):197-203, 2005.01.
222. Zhang, D.M., Yoshimatsu, T. and Furuse, M., Effects of L-carnitine enrichment on the population growth, egg ratio and body size of the marine rotifer, Brachionus rotundiformis, Aquaculture, 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2005.04.019, 248, 1-4, 51-57, 248(1-4):51-57, 2005.01.
223. Tachibana, T., Sato, M., Takahashi, H., Ukena, K., Tsutsui, K. and Furuse, M., Gonadotropin-inhibiting hormone stimulates feeding behavior in chicks, Brain Research, 10.1016/j.brainres.2005.05.035, 1050, 1-2, 94-100, 1050(1-2):94-100, 2005.01.
224. Koutoku, T., Takahashi, H., Tomonaga, S., Oikawa, D., Saito, S., Tachibana, T., Han, L., Hayamizu, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of phosphatidylserine attenuates isolation stress induced behavior in chicks, Neurochemistry International, 10.1016/j.neuint.2005.03.006, 47, 3, 183-189, 47(3):185-191, 2005.01.
225. Takahashi, H., Iigo, M., Ando, K., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Regulation of body temperature by thyrotropin releaing hormone in neonatal chicks, Developmental Brain Research, 10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.03.004, 157, 1, 58-64, 157(1):58-64, 2005.01.
226. Koga, Y., Takahashi, H., Oikawa, D., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Brain creatine functions to attenuate acute stress responses through gabanergic system in chicks, Neuroscience, 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2005.01.004, 132, 1, 65-71, 132(1):65-71, 2005.01.
227. Tachibana, T., Hiramatsu, K., Furuse, M., Hasegawa, S., Yoshizawa, F. and Sugahara, K., Distributions of proglucagon mRNA and GLP-1 in the brain of chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 140(2):203-207, 2005.01.
228. Saito, E.-S., Kaiya, H., Tachibana, T., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M., Kangawa, K. and Furuse, M., Inhibitory effect of ghrelin on food intake is mediated by the corticotropin-releasing factor system in neonatal chicks, Regulatory Peptides, 10.1016/j.regpep.2004.09.003, 125, 1-3, 201-208, 125(1-3):201-208, 2005.01.
229. Koga, Y., Saito, S., Kaneko, K., Kido, Y. and Furuse, M., Changes in plasma constituents of cross-bred (aigamo) ducks during winter season, Journal of Poultry Science, 41(2):131-139, 2004.01.
230. Bungo, T., Ueda, H., Kitazawa, T., Taneike, T. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken motilin does not induce hyperphagia in meat-type chicks, Physiology & Behavior, 10.1016/j.physbeh.2004.02.032, 82, 2-3, 199-203, 82(2-3):199-203, 2004.01.
231. Tachibana, T., Saito, E.-S., Saito, S., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Comparison of brain arginine-vasotocin and corticotrophin-releasing factor for physiological responses in chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/j.neulet.2004.02.055, 360, 3, 165-169, 360(3):165-169, 2004.01.
232. Zhang, R., Tachibana, T., Takagi, T., Koutoku, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Serotonin modifies corticotropin-releasing factor-induced behaviors of chicks, Behavioural Brain Research, 10.1016/j.bbr.2003.08.005, 151, 1-2, 47-52, 151(1-2):47-52, 2004.01.
233. Tachibana, T., Saito, S., Tomonaga, S., Takagi, T., Saito, E.-S., Nakanishi, T., Koutoku, T., Tsukada, A., Ohkubo, T., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Effect of central administration of prolactin-releasing peptide on feeding in chicks, Physiology & Behavior, 10.1016/j.physbeh.2003.12.005, 80, 5, 713-719, 80(5):713-719, 2004.01.
234. Nakanishi, T., Oikawa, D., Koutoku, T., Hirakawa, H., Kido, Y., Tachibana, T. and Furuse M., Gamma-Linolenic acid prevents conjugated linoleic acid-induced fatty liver in mice, Nutrition, 10.1016/j.nut.2003.12.014, 20, 4, 390-393, 20(4):390-393, 2004.01.
235. Tachibana, T., Hirofuji, K., Matsumoto, M., Furuse, M., Hasegawa, S., Yoshizawa, F. and Sugahara, K., The hypothalamus is involved in the anorexic effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 10.1016/j.cbpb.2003.09.026, 137, 1, 183-188, 137(1):183-188, 2004.01.
236. Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T.,Takagi, T., Saito, E.-S. , Zhang, R., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Effect of central administration of carnosine and its constituents on behaviors in chicks, Brain Research Bulletin, 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2004.01.002, 63, 1, 75-82, 63(1):75-82, 2004.01.
237. Saito, S., Takagi, T., Koutoku, T., Saito, E.-S., Hirakawa, H., Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Differences in catecholamine metabolism and behaviour in neonatal broiler and layer chicks, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071660410001715740, 45, 2, 158-162, 45(2):158-162, 2004.01.
238. Tachibana, T., Saito, E.-S., Takahashi, H., Saito, S., Tomonaga, T., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Anorexigenic effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the chick brain are mediated by corticotrophin-releasing factor, Regulatory Peptides, 10.1016/j.regpep.2004.02.016, 120, 1-3, 99-105, 120(1-3):99-105, 2004.01.
239. Effect of oral administration of L-pipecolic acid on food intake in chicks and mice
It has been demonstrated that L-pipecolic acid (L-PA), a major metabolic intermediate of L-lysine (L-Lys) in the brain, is involved in the functioning of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system. Previous study has shown that intracerebroventricular injection of L-PA suppressed feeding and induced sleep-like behavior in neonatal chicks. The present study examines whether the action of L-PA was induced by gavage in both chicks and mice. Oral administration of L-PA significantly inhibited food intake at 2 h after treatment in neonatal chicks, although no significant effect of L-Lys was detected. In mice, oral L-PA suppressed food intake compared to the control after 2 h of treatment. It was concluded that L-PA was effective for suppression of food intake after oral administration in both avian and mammalian species..
240. Bungo, T., Izumi, T., Kawamura, K., Takagi, T., Ueda, H. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of muscimol, baclofen or nipecotic acid stimulates food intake of layer-type, but not meat-type chicks, Brain Research, 10.1016/j.brainres.2003.09.017, 993, 1-2, 235-238, 993(1-2):235-238, 2003.01.
241. Hayamizu, K., Ishi, Y., Kaneko, I., Shen, M., Okuhara, Y., Shigematsu, N., Tomi, H., Furuse, M., Yoshino, G. and Shimasaki, H., Effects of Garcinia cambogia (hydroxycitric acid) on visceral fat accumulation in humans: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, Current Therapeutic Research, 10.1016/S0011-393X(03)00152-8, 64, 8, 551-567, 64(8):551-567, 2003.01.
242. Zhang, R., Tachibana, T., Takagi, T., Koutoku, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Centrally administered norepinephrine modifies the behavior induced by corticotropin-releasing factor in neonatal chicks, Journal of Neuroscience Research, 10.1002/jnr.10798, 74, 4, 630-636, 74(4):630-636, 2003.01.
243. Tachibana, T., Tomonaga, S., Oikawa, D., Saito, S., Takagi, T., Saito, E.-S., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibit feeding in the chick brain by different mechanisms, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(03)00646-3, 348, 1, 25-28, 348(1):25-28, 2003.01.
244. Oikawa, D., Nakanishi, T., Nakamura, Y., Takahashi, Y., Yamamoto, T., Shiba, N., Tobisa, M., Takagi, T., Iwamoto, H., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., Dietary CLA and DHA modify skin properties in mice, Lipids, 10.1007/s11745-003-1105-x, 38, 6, 609-614, 38(6):609-614, 2003.01.
245. Takagi, T., Tachibana, T., Saito, E.-S., Tomonaga, S., Saito, S., Bungo, T., Denbow, D.M., Furuse, M., Central pipecolic acid increases food intake under ad libitum feeding conditions in the neonatal chick, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(03)00701-8, 347, 2, 93-96, 347(2):93-96, 2003.01.
246. Tachibana, T., Takagi, T., Saito, E.-S., Tomonaga, S., Zhang, R., Koga, Y., Kido, Y., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Beta 3-adrenergic receptor is involved in feeding regulation in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 10.1016/S1095-6433(03)00107-7, 135, 3, 403-409, 135(3):403-409, 2003.01.
247. Takagi, T., Bungo, T., Tachibana, T., Saito, E.-S., Saito, S., Yamasaki, I., Tomonaga, S., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular administration of GABA-A and GABA-B receptor antagonists attenuate feeding and sleep-like behavior induced by L-pipecolic acid in the neonatal chick, Journal of Neuroscience Research, 10.1002/jnr.10656, 73, 2, 270-275, 73(2):270-275, 2003.01.
248. Yamasaki, I., Takagi, T., Oikawa, D., Koutoku, T., Koga, Y., Tomonaga, S., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Changes in catecholamines and dopaminergic metabolites in pigeon brain during development from the late embryonic stage toward hatch, Zoological Science, 20, 5, 551-555, 20(5):551-555, 2003.01.
249. Hayamizu, K., Hirakawa, H., Oikawa, D., Nakanishi, T., Takagi, T., Tachibana, T. and Furuse, M., Effect of hydroxycitrate on serum leptin and insulin in mice, Fitoterapia, 74(3):267-273, 2003.01.
250. Nakanishi, T., Koutoku, T., Kawahara, S., Murai, A. and Furuse, M., Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reduces cerebral prostaglandin E2 in mice, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(03)00189-7, 341, 2, 135-138, 341(2):135-138, 2003.01.
251. Tachibana, T., Matsumoto, M., Furuse, M., Hasegawa, S., Yoshizawa, F. and Sugahara, K., Central, but not peripheral, glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits crop emptying in chicks, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 10.1016/S1095-6433(03)00009-6, 134, 4, 777-781, 134(4):777-781, 2003.01.
252. Tachibana, T., Saito, S., Tomonaga, T., Takagi, T., Saito, E.-S., Boswell, T. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide inhibits feeding in chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(03)00017-X, 339, 3, 203-206, 339(3):203-206, 2003.01.
253. Koutoku, T., Zhang, R., Tachibana, T., Oshima, Y. and Furuse, M., Effect of acute L-tryptophan exposure on the brain serotonergic system and behavior in the male medaka, Zoological Science, 10.2108/zsj.20.121, 20, 2, 121-124, 20(2):121-124, 2003.01.
254. Tachibana, T., Takagi, T., Tomonaga, S., Ohgushi, A., Ando, R., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript inhibits food intake in chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(02)01321-6, 337, 3, 131-134, 337(3):131-134, 2003.01.
255. Koga, Y., Yamasaki, I., Saito, E.-S., Saito, S., Takagi, T., Tachibana, T., Kido, Y. and Furuse, M., Comparison of plasma constituents between Japanese quail and chickens under fed and fasted conditions, Journal of Applied Animal Research, 24, 1, 1-6, 24(1):1-6, 2003.01.
256. Saito, S., Takagi, T., Koutoku, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Feeding condition and strain difference influence sleeping behavior in newborn chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 40(1):62-68, 2003.01.
257. Hayamizu, K., Ishi, Y., Shigematsu, N., Okuhara, Y., Tomi, H., Furuse, M., Yoshino, G. and Shimasaki, H., Safety of Garcinia cambogia extract in healthy men. - High-doses administration study I -, Journal of Oleo Science, 52(9):499-504, 2003.01.
258. Nakanishi, T., Koutoku, T. and Furuse, M., Effect of conjugated linoleic acid during pregnancy and lactation on growth and liver triacylglycerol content in offspring of mice, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 6(1):7-11, 2003.01.
259. Effects of intrayolk injection of bisphenol a on hatchability and sex ratio in chickens
The effect of intra yolk injection of bisphenol A (BPA) on hatching and sex ratio in domestic chicken was investigated. The fertilized eggs were injected with four levels (0, 1, 10, 100 ng/10 µl) of BPA in three experiments just before incubation, with a fifth level of 1000 ng/10 fil in experiment 2. The hatchability, embryonic stages of eggs failed to hatch and the phenotypical sex in gonadal organ were determined in experiment 1. There was no significant difference in hatchability and death ratios of each embryonic stage among all the treatments. In phenotype sexing, chicks injected with 100 ng BPA tended to show higher male ratio than the control. Besides phenotypical sexing in experiment 2, DNA sexing was conducted by polymerase chain reaction using a set of primers from the flanking sequences in chicken, but BPA did not affect gonadal sex differentiation in the chicken. BPA was not detected in the brain, liver and residual yolk in all treatments in experiment 3. These findings suggest that low doses of BPA have no toxic effect on the hatchability and embryonic development in the chicken. © GSP, India..
260. Effect of environmental lighting on aggressive and anxious behavior in male mine
To study the influence of the different conditions of environmental lightning on aggressive behavior and open field activity, male mice where kept under different conditions of environmental lighting, i.e., A) 12-hour each light and dark (LD), B) continuons light (LL) and C) continuous dark (DD) for 27 days. Although no significant differences were observed among three groups, LL and DD conditions tended to show the inhibitory effect on aggression. In the open field test, the Crossing, the time and the path significantly increased with the length of lighting period, but the rearing and defecation were not affected. The amounts of monoamines and their metabolites in the cerebellum, cerebrum and brainstem were hardly affected by lighting conditions. Taken together, DD condition was most preferable for mice to keep cal m rather LL condition. © GSP, India..
261. Comparison of Hypothalamic Monoamine Contents of Broiler-and Layer- Type Chickens at Prehatch and Posthatch
Domestic chickens, which are precocial, have relatively well developed mechanisms of food intake regulation at hatch. Although their body weight is similar at hatch, broiler- and layer-type chickens have different growth rates and food intake following hatch. The purpose of the present study was to compare the hypothalamic content of the monoamines norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetic acid (HVA) and 5-dihydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) between these strains on day 18 of incubation, and at 0 day-of-age. In both strains, 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels increased with age. On day 18 of incubation, the amounts of NE and E were almost the same between the two strains. Thereafter, the content of both monoamines rapidly increased at hatch in both strains, and layer-type chicken embryos had significantly higher E levels compared to broiler-type chicken embryos. The levels of DOPAC and HVA on day 18 of incubation were higher in broiler-type chicken embryos than in layer-type chicken embryos, but these differences were reduced at hatch. These changes at hatch may partly explain the difference in the performance between the two strains. © 2003, Japan Poultry Science Association. All rights reserved..
262. R Zhang, A Ohgushi, T Takagi, T Nakanishi, ES Saito, T Yoshimatsu, DM Denbow, M Furuse, Alpha-helical CRF9.41, blocks stress- and CRF-induced behavior changes in chicks, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 22, 2, 169-176, 22(2):169-176, 2002.12, Three experiments were conducted to test the role of the brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system in mediating stress-induced behaviors and regulating food intake by using CRF receptor autagonists (a-helical CRF9.41 and astressin) in chicks. In Experiment 1, birds were intracerebro-ventricularly (i.c.v.) injected with 10 mug of alpha-helical CRF9.41 or saline and placed individually into an acrylic glass recording chamber 20 min post-injection and automatically monitored by an audio analysis application for 60 seconds. The number of distress vocalizations (DVs) induced by isolation was significantly suppressed by alpha-helical CRF9.41 compared to the control group. Chicks were similarly treated with astressin in doses of 0, 5 and 10 mug in Experiment 2, but no significant difference of DVs was observed. In Experiment 3, after a 3h fast, birds were i.c.v. injected with either saline, 0.1 mug of CRF, 0.1 mug of CRF + 5 mug of alpha-helical CRF9.41 or 0.1 mug of CRF + 10 mug of alpha-helical CRF9.41 and food intake was measured for 2h. CRF suppressed food intake and a-helical CRF9.41 partially blocked such effect. The results suggested that 1) alpha-helical CRF9.41 attenuated the behavior changes induced by isolation and exogenous CRF; 2) CRF receptors in avian species may be somewhat different from that in mammals..
263. Bungo, T, Tachibana, T, Sashihara, K, Kawakami, S-I, Ohgushi, A, Furuse, M, Ueda, H, Feeding and drinking responses and hypothalamic monoamine concentrations of neonatal chicks following intracerebroventricular injection of 6-OHDA, Journal of Applied Animal Research, 22, 2, 183-192, 22(2):183-192, 2002.12.
264. K Sashihara, T Bungo, R Ando, A Ohgushi, SI Kawakami, DM Denbow, M Furuse, Role of central serotonergic systems on the regulation of feeding behavior of chicks in two different strains, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 21, 1, 17-23, 21(1):17-23, 2002.03, Significant role of 5-HT for control of feeding behavior in mammalian and avian species is well known. To study the strain difference in the mechanisms of serotonergic systems on food intake, effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of serotonin (5-HT) or 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-(propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT: 5-HT, receptor agonist) on two strains of chicks (Cobb and Ross Chunky) was examined. Central administration of 5-HT suppressed food intake of chicks in both strains, but 5-HT induced anorexia lasted longer in Cobb than in Ross Chunky. Food intake in Ross Chunky enhanced by the highest dose of 8-OH-DPAT, but not in Cobb. The difference of sensitivity for 5-HT between two strains could be because of the density or binding affinity of 5-HT1A receptor. This evidence suggests that there are some genetic differences in central serotonergic systems between two strains on the regulation of food intake..
265. Saito, E.-S., Kaiya, H., Takagi, T., Yamasaki, I., Denbow, D.M., Kangawa, K. and Furuse, M., Chicken ghrelin and growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 inhibits food intake of neonatal chicks, European Journal of Pharmacology, 10.1016/S0014-2999(02)02393-2, 453, 1, 75-79, 453(1):75-79, 2002.01.
266. Bungo, T., Higaki, T. Ueda, H. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular administration of octopamine stimulates food intake of chicks through a 2-adorenoceptor, Physiology & Behavior, 10.1016/S0031-9384(02)00750-3, 76, 4-5, 575-578, 76(4-5):575-578, 2002.01.
267. Tachibana, T., Tanaka, S., Furuse, M., Hasegawa, S., Kato, H. and Sugahara, K., Intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide-1 decreases the monoamine concentrations of the hypothalamus in chicks, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071660120109971, 43, 1, 122-126, 43(1):122-126, 2002.01.
268. Kita, K. Kitayama, Y., Nagao, K., Hwangbo, J., Furuse, M. and Okumura, J., Dietary sorbose failed to ameliorate hyperglycemia in alloxan-injected diabetic mice, Journal of Applied Animal Research, 21, 1, 49-55, 21(1):49-55, 2002.01.
269. Kita, K. Kitayama, Y., Nagao, K., Hwangbo, J., Furuse, M. and Okumura, J., Dietary sorbose ameliorates obesity and hyperglycemia in gold thioglucose-injected obese mice, Journal of Applied Animal Research, 22, 1, 25-32, 22(1):25-32, 2002.01.
270. Bungo, T., Higaki, T., Ueda, H. and Furuse, M., Comparison of the effects of octopamine and noradrenaline on feeding and sleep-like behavior in fasted chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 39(4):316-322, 2002.01.
271. Hayashi, K., Furuse, M., Soh, T., Kusaba, H., Iwamoto, H. and Ando, K., Develpoment and age-related change of cerebrovascular noradrenergic (NA) innervation in the Japanese quail, Animal Science Journal, 73(6):523-531, 2002.01.
272. Intracerebroventricular Injection of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Does not Alter Monoamine Content of the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Neonatal Chicks
Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on monoamine contents of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) was investigated in neonatal chicks. The PVN was isolated from the brains of neonatal chicks 15 minutes after the i.c.v. administration of 0, 0.01, 0.1 or 1μg of CRF. The concentrations of noradrenaline, adrenaline, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, dopamine, 5 -hydroxyindole-3-acetic, homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine were determined. The monoamines and their metabolites showed some alterations, but the differences were not significant among all treatments. The results suggested that CRF did not affect the monoamine contents of the PVN in the neonatal chick. © 2002, Japan Poultry Science Association. All rights reserved..
273. Ghrelin activates behavior of neonatal chicks in a short period of post- intracerebroventricular injection
Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH)-releasing peptide with an acylated side chain, is the endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ghrelin stimulates GH secretion and feeding of rats, but ghrelin inhibited feeding of neonatal chicks. It was also confirmed that ghrelin induced sleep-like behavior later than 30 minutes post-administration in neonatal chicks. However, exciting behavior was observed in a short period (less than 30 min) in previous reports. Thus, we further investigated the behavioral changes in neonatal chicks by ICV administration of ghrelin within a short period. Chicks were divided into two groups and administered ICV saline or 2 fig of ghrelin and the numbers of step and vocalization were monitored. Just after behavioral test, the amount of monoamines of chick hypothalamus was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Central ghrelin enhanced the numbersof step and kept the numbers of vocalization, but no significant difference in the amount of monoamines was detected. In conclusion, central ghrelin activates chick behavior in a short period without modification of hypothalamic monoamine contents. © GSP, India..
274. T Nakanishi, A Ohgushi, T Yamashita, K Sashihara, T Takagi, E Dobashi, T Kamegai, M Kasai, T Yoshimatsu, M Furuse, Effect of orally administered conjugated linoleic acids on behaviors and tissue fatty acid compositions in mice, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 20, 2, 157-170, 20(2):157-170, 2001.12, To compare the influences of the oral administration of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on behaviors and fatty acid composition of some tissue with those of linoleic acid (LA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), mice (8-week old) were orally administered with oils containing high levels of CLA, DHA or LA for 4 weeks (6 days per week, 0.2 ml per day). Control group was administered with saline. Behavioral tests such as locomotor activity, swim test, elevated plus maze test and biting test were done on the commencement of the study (0 week) and 2 and 4 weeks after treatments. No significant changes were observed in all the parameters. Oral CLA increased the liver weight and reduced the epididymal white adipose tissue weight. The ratio of arachidonic acid to total fatty acids was significantly increased by LA and decreased by CLA compared with the control, especially in the liver. Small amounts of CLA were detected in the brain of mice administered with CLA or LA groups, but not detected in mice of the control and DHA groups. The level of DHA in the brain was not altered by DHA administration. It is concluded that oral administration of CLA influenced some tissues but not behaviours of mice at lease after growth..
275. Interaction of corticotropin-releasing factor and glucagon-like peptide-1 on behaviors in chicks
Both corticortropin-releasing factor (CRF) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) inhibit food intake of chicks, but they also produce other behaviors. The present experiments were undertaken to clarify the interaction of CRF and GLP-1 regarding their anorectic actions as well as other behaviors. In Experiment 1, birds were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), following a 3-h fast, with either saline, 0.1 μg of CRF, 0.1 μg of CRF + 0.1 μg of GLP-1 or 0.1 μg of CRF + 1 μg of GLP-1, and food intake was measured for 2 h. The injection of CRF decreased food intake, and CRF injected with GLP-1 suppressed food intake for up to 2 h. Birds were treated similarly in Experiment 2 in which the doses of CRF and GLP-1 were reversed. GLP-1 strongly suppressed food intake, and this effect was augmented by coadministration of CRF. In Experiment 3, the behaviors of chicks injected with saline, CRF (0.1 μg), GLP-1 (0.1 μg) or CRF (0.1 μg) + GLP-1 (0.1 μg) were monitored for the numbers of steps, vocalization and locomotion. Chicks were excited, moved more and vocalized loudly following injection of CRF, whereas an opposite response was seen with GLP-1. The behaviors were intermediate following the coinjection of the two peptides. In conclusion, CRF and GLP-1 interact in the chick brain, but the response depends on the behavior being measured. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved..
276. Bungo, T, Kawakami, S.-I, Ohgushi, A, Sashihara, K, Saito, N, Sugahara, K, Hasegawa, S, Denbow, D.M, Furuse, M, Intracerebroventricular injection of fusaric acid attenuates the anorexia by glucagons-like peptide-1 in the neonatal chick., Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 70, 2-3, 251-255, 70(2-3):251-255, 2001.10.
277. Tachibana T, Sugahara K, Ohgushi A, Ando R, Sashihara K, Yoshimatsu T, Furuse M, Intracerebroventricular injection of exendin (5–39) increases food intake of layer-type chicks but not broiler chicks, Brain Research, 10.1016/S0006-8993(01)02943-2, 915, 2, 234-237, 915(2):234-237, 2001.10.
278. Bungo, T, Ando, R, Kawakami, S.-I, Ohgushi, A, Furuse, M, The role of central catecholaminergic systems in regulation of food intake of chicks., The Journal of Poultry Science, 38, 1, 35-40, 38(1):35-40, 2001.03.
279. T Yamashita, M Tobisa, A Ohgushi, M Furuse, Enhancement of plasma calcium concentration by dietary calcium sources and oligosaccharides in neonatal chicks, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 19, 1, 25-32, 19(1):25-32, 2001.03, The effects of dietary calcium (Ca) sources and several oligosaccharides on plasma Ca concentration were examined in the neonatal chick. In the first experiment, the efficiency of Ca carbonate and eggshell Ca was compared by determining plasma Ca concentration at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min post oral administration. It was significantly higher in the eggshell Ca treatment than in the Ca carbonate treatment and the peak for plasma Ca concentration was obtained at 30 min. The effect of dietary oligosaccharides on plasma Ca concentration was investigated by using isomaltooligosaccharides, gentiooligosaccharides and nigerooligosaccharides with Ca carbonate. In the second experiment Nigerooligosaccharides enhanced plasma Ca concentration when compared with other treatments. The efficacy of lactose and nigerooligosaccharides on plasma Ca concentration was compared in the third experiment, but no significant difference was detected between them. These results suggested that plasma Ca concentration of the neonatal chick can be modified by dietary Ca sources and the supplementation with specific oligosaccharides..
280. T Bungo, YH Choi, M Furuse, Chronic inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system with guanethidine: Effects on body and organ weights and food intake of chicks given a phenylalanine excess diet, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 19, 1, 97-106, 19(1):97-106, 2001.03, To investigate the effect of chronic inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system oil food intake in the chicken, guanethidine (GTD, 0 or 50 mg/kg body weight/d), all adrenergic blocker, was subcutaneously administered to chicks for 4 weeks starting at 10 days of age in experiment 1, Chronic GTD decreased body weight gain and brain weight, but not heart and adrenal gland weights. Irt the second; experiment, effects of chronic GTD and dietary excess phenylalanine (Phe) oil; daily food intake were investigated at one week interval for 4 weeks. At each week, food intake was determined at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h after feeding. Significant dietary effects of excess Phe were found at several times iir every week, but chronic GTD administration did not alter intake of Pile excess diet.;Main effect of GTD could be detected until 2 weeks of feeding. A significant interaction between GTD and Phe treatments was detected in some times determined until 3 weeks of feeding, implied that effects of excess Phe improved by GTD. At a. final! week, dietary excess Phe decreased food intake, but the effect of GTD disappeared. It is possible that the anorexia by excess Phe may be affected by sympathectomy ill an early week of age..
281. Takagi, T., Ando, R., Ohgushi, A., Yamashita, T., Dobashi, E., Hussain-Yusuf, H., Onodera, R., Bungo, T., Sato, H. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of pipecolic acid inhibits food intake and induces sleeping-like behaviors in the neonatal chick, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(01)02059-6, 310, 2-3, 97-100, 310(2-3):97-100, 2001.01.
282. Ando, R., Kawakami, S.-I., Bungo, T., Ohgushi, A., Takagi, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Feeding responses for several neuropeptide Y receptor agonists in the neonatal chick, European Journal of Pharmacology, 10.1016/S0014-2999(01)01201-8, 427, 1, 53-59, 427(1):53-59, 2001.01.
283. Zhang, R., Nakanishi, T., Ohgushi, A., Ando, R., Yoshimatsu, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Suppression of food intake induced by corticotropin-releasing factor family in neonatal chicks, European Journal of Pharmacology, 10.1016/S0014-2999(01)01109-8, 427, 1, 37-41, 427(1):37-41, 2001.01.
284. Sashihara, K., Miyamoto, M., Ohgushi, A., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Influence of ketone body and the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation on the food intake of the chick, British Poultry Science, 42, 3, 405-408, 42(3):405-408, 2001.01.
285. Tachibana, T., Sugahara, K., Ohgushi, A., Ando, R., Kawakami, S.-I., Yoshimatsu, T. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of agouti-related protein attenuates the anorexigenic effect of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(01)01827-4, 305, 2, 131-134, 305(2):131-134, 2001.01.
286. Furuse, M., Tachibana, T., Ohgushi, A., Ando, R., Yoshimatsu, T. and Denbow, D.M., Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing factor inhibits food intake in neonatal chicks, Neuroscience Letters, 10.1016/S0304-3940(01)01621-4, 301, 2, 123-126, 301(2):123-126, 2001.01.
287. Sashihara, K., Ohgushi, A., Ando, R., Yamashita, T., Takagi, T., Nakanishi, T., Yoshimatsu, T. and Furuse, M., Effects of central administration of bisphenol A on behaviors and growth in chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 38(4):275-281, 2001.01.
288. Tachibana, T., Ohgushi, A. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin induces sleep-like behavior in neonatal chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 38(4):358-363, 2001.01.
289. Ohgushi, A., Nakanishi, T., Bungo, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on isolation-induced distress behavior in chicks, Animal Science Journal, 72(5):427-430, 2001.01.
290. Ohgushi, A., Yamashita, T., Sashihara, K., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Influence of intrayolk administration of docosahexaenoic acid on behaviors of chicks after hatching, Animal Science Journal, 72(6):494-497, 2001.01.
291. Yunus, M., Ohba, N., Tobisa, M., Nakano, Y., Shimojo, M., Furuse, M. and Masuda, Y., Improving fermentation and nutritive quality of Napiergrass silage by mixing with Pharsey bean, Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Science, 14, 7, 947-950, 14(7):947-950, 2001.01.
292. Kawakami, S.-I., Ando, R., Bungo, T., Ohgushi, A., Tachibana, T., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Central administration of BIBP3226, neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor antagonist, does not inhibit fasting- and NPY-induced food intake in neonatal chicks, Journal of Poultry Science, 38(4):259-265, 2001.01.
293. A Ohgushi, T Bungo, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, DM Denbow, M Furuse, Relationships between feeding and locomotion behaviors after central administration of CRF in chicks, PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 72, 1-2, 287-289, 72(1-2):287-289, 2001.01, The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on various behaviors in chicks was determined at 15-min intervals over a 30-min period. Food intake of chicks was significantly decreased, and pecking rhythm was significantly delayed by CRF during the first 15-min post-injection. The similar tendencies were observed in the second 15-min post-injection, but not significantly different. Stepping, as an indicator of locomotion, was not different at 15-min post-injection, but was increased by CRF, thereafter. These results suggest that CRF acts within the central nervous system to decrease food intake and increase locomotion in the chick. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved..
294. M Furuse, T Bungo, R Ao, R Ando, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, DM Denbow, Involvement of central gastrin and cholecystokinin in the regulation of food intake in the neonatal chick, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 18, 2, 129-136, 18(2):129-136, 2000.12, The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of chicken gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) on food intake were compared in the neonatal chick. In Experiment 1, the effect of 131 pmol of chicken gastrin (36 amino acid residues) on food intake was compared with 66 and 131 pmoL of CCK-8S over 2h. Chicken gastrin strongly inhibited food intake, but both levels of CCK-8S did not, The similar effect of 131 pmol chicken gastrin was obtained by 262 pmoL CCK-8S at Ih after ICV injection in Experiment 2. This suppressive effect of chicken gastrin continued over 2h after ICV injection though the effect of CCK-8S had disappeared by 2h. In. Experiment 3, the effects of 131 pmol of CCK- 8S, CCK-33S and chicken gastrin were compared. The effect of CCK-8S was weak, but CCK-33S and chicken gastrin similarly and strongly inhibited food intake of chicks. These results suggested that the suppressive effect of food intake of gastrin /CCK family may be dependent upon the length of amino acid sequence..
295. R Ando, T Bungo, SI Kawakami, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, M Furuse, Intracerebroventricular injection of mammalian motilin, melanin-concentrating hormone or galanin does not stimulate food intake in neonatal chicks, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 41, 4, 508-511, 41(4):508-511, 2000.09, 1. Several neural peptides are known to stimulate feeding behaviour in mammalian species. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether central injection of mammalian motilin, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or galanin stimulates feeding in the neonatal chick.
2. None of the peptides applied here enhanced the food intake of the chick.
3. It is suggested that motilin, MCH and galanin, at least those of mammalian origin, may not regulate feeding in neonatal chicks, when administered to the central nervous system..
296. T Bungo, R Ando, SI Kawakami, A Ohgushi, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, M Furuse, Central bombesin inhibits food intake and the orexigenic effect of neuropeptide Y in the neonatal chick, PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 70, 5, 573-576, 70(5):573-576, 2000.09, It is well known that central injection of bombesin (BN) suppresses feeding in mammalian and avian species, but the anorexigenic effect of central BN are still open with special reference to the chick. The dose response (0, 0.1 and 0.5 mug) of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of BN was examined in Experiment 1. ICV injection of BN inhibited food intake in a dose-dependent manner. Experiment 2 was done to determine whether BN interacts with the orexigenic effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the neonatal chick. Central administration of NPY (2.5 mug) greatly enhanced food intake, but co-injection of BN (0.5 mug) suppressed food intake. The dose response of NPY (2.5 mug) co-injected with three levels of BN (0, 0.1 and 0.5 Gig) was examined in Experiment 3. ICV injection of BN attenuated the hyperphagia by NPY in a dose-related fashion. It is suggested that central BN may interact with NPY for the regulation of feeding in the neonatal chick. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved..
297. S Kawakami, T Bungo, R Ando, A Ohgushi, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, M Furuse, Central administration of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone inhibits fasting- and neuropeptide Y-induced feeding in neonatal chicks, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 398, 3, 361-364, 398(3):361-364, 2000.06, In the present study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) on food intake of neonatal chicks was examined. In experiment 1, i.c.v. injection of alpha-MSH (0.04, 0.2 and 1 mu g) significantly inhibited food intake of 3-h fasted chicks in a dose-dependent manner. In experiment 2, alpha-MSH strongly inhibited neuropeptide Y-induced feeding when neuropeptide Y (2.5 mu g) and several doses of alpha-MSH were given simultaneously i.c.v. These results suggest that alpha-MSH plays an important role in the regulation of food intake of neonatal chicks. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved..
298. R Mori, A Murai, J Okumura, S Sugita, K Sugahara, M Furuse, Effect of cyclodextrins on small intestinal mucosa and glucose absorption in the rat, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 17, 2, 201-208, 17(2):201-208, 2000.06, Cyclodextrin (CD) is the cyclic oligomer of glucose and can uptake hydrophobic molecules irt its structure, In the present study, the influences of three hinds of CD on rat intestinal mucosa and absorptional function of glucose were studied. This investigation was done by perfusing the solutions into rat small intestine. beta-CD and gamma-CD, not alpha-CD, extracted cholesterol from small intestinal mucosa. Three CDs did not extract phospholipids and protein, the other components of cell membrane, from small intestinal mucosa. These results suggested that decrease Of glucose absorption via active transport system by beta-CD is due to the interaction between the membrane components and beta-CD. This interaction would induce changes of membrane structure, resulting in inhibition of the route of glucose absorption via Na+-glucose co-transporter..
299. T Bungo, YH Choi, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, DM Denbow, M Furuse, A nitric oxide synthase inhibitor attenuates neuropeptide Y- and clonidine-induced feeding in the neonatal chick, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ANIMAL RESEARCH, 17, 2, 257-264, 17(2):257-264, 2000.06, It is reported that inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) decreased food intake in mammalian and avian species. On the other hand, central administration of alpha(2)-agonists stimulated food intake in both species. Similarly, neuropeptide Y (NPY) has the orexigenic effect mediated by alpha(2) receptors. The present study was done to determine whether central injection of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, in the neonatal chick modulates the increase in food intake induced by NPY- and clonidine (CLON, a specific alpha(2)-agonist)-induced food intake. Both NPY (2.5 mu g)- and CLON (50 ng)-induced food intake of neonatal chicks was significantly attenuated by coadministration with the higher doses of L-NAME (0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg). Our results suggest that NO may interact with orexigenic systems in modulating food intake in the neonatal chick..
300. S Kawakami, T Bungo, A Ohgushi, R Ando, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, DM Denbow, M Furuse, Brain-derived mast cells could mediate histamine-induced inhibition of food intake in neonatal chicks, BRAIN RESEARCH, 857, 1-2, 313-316, 857(1-2):313-316, 2000.02, In the present study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine on food intake of neonatal chicks was examined over 2 h, Histamine (100, 200 or 400 nmol, respectively) was injected in the lateral ventricle of 2-day-old chicks, and cumulative food intakes were measured. i.c.v. injection of histamine significantly inhibited food intake in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, compound 48/80, which causes degranulation of mast cells and release of histamine, or thioperamide, which is an antagonist of the histamine H3 autoreceptor and increases histamine release from histaminergic nerve terminals, was injected i.c.v. to clarify whether mast cell- or neuron-derived histamine in the: central nervous system of chicks is essential to the feeding inhibition. Central administration of compound 48/80 inhibited food intake with a dose-dependent manner, but thioperamide had no effect on feeding. An inhibitor of mast cell degranulation, sodium cromoglycate, somewhat attenuated food intake inhibited by compound 48/80. These results suggest that brain-derived mast cells could be a major source of histamine in the inhibition of food intake of neonatal chicks. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved..
301. Murai, A., Satoh, S., Okumura, J. and Furuse, M., Factors regulating amylase secretion from chicken pancreatic acini in vitro, Life Sciences, 10.1016/S0024-3205(99)00631-1, 66, 7, 585-591, 66(7): 585-590, 2000.01.
302. Bungo, T., Choi, Y.-H., Denbow, D.M., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricularly administered neuropeptide Y and clonidine: Effects on feeding behavior in the neonatal chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 37(1):27-32, 2000.01.
303. Bungo, T., Choi, Y.-H., Denbow, D.M., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricularly administered neuropeptide Y and clonidine: Effects on feeding behavior in the neonatal chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 37(1):27-32, 2000.01.
304. Kita, K., Sakai, S., Okumura, M., Nakajima, S., Nakagawa, J., Furuse, M. and Okumura, J., Effects of soaking barley in water containing phytase on growth and plasma phosphorus concentration in chicks, Animal Science Journal, 71(3):250-254, 2000.01.
305. Asano, Y., Imura, Y., Shimojo, M., Furuse, M. and Masuda, Y., Diurnal variation of amylase activities and carbohydrate contents in root and stem of phasey bean (Macroptilium lathyroides L. Urb.), Grassland Science, 46(1):66-69, 2000.01.
306. Honda, K., Suzuki, M., Kamisoyama, H., Motoki, T., Kano, K., Yagi, K., Sugahara, K., Furuse, M. and Hasegawa, S., Influence of dietary protein types on the suppressive food intake induced by intracerebroventricular administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 in chicks, Japanese Poultry Science, 37(4):251-257, 2000.01.
307. Ando, R., Bungo, T. and Furuse, M., Administration of erythromycin does not stimulate food intake in fasted chickens, Japanese Poultry Science, 37(6):372-378, 2000.01.
308. Yunus, M., Ohba, N., Shimojo, M., Furuse, M. and Masuda, Y., Effects of adding urea and molasses on Napiergrass silage quality, Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Science, 13, 11, 1542-1547, 13(11):1542-1547, 2000.01.
309. M Furuse, R Ando, T Bungo, R Ao, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, Intracerebroventricular injection of orexins does not stimulate food intake in neonatal chicks, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 40, 5, 698-700, 40(5):698-700, 1999.12, 1. Recently, 2 novel neuropeptides were discovered, both derived from the same precursor by proteolytic professing, which bind and activate 2 closely related orphan G protein-coupled receptors, Named orexin-A and -B (Sakurai et at., 1998). Both stimulate food intake when administered centrally to rats.
2. Our aim was to elucidate whether central injection of mammalian orexin-A. or -B stimulates food intake in the chick.
3. Under conditions of free access to food, orexin-A did not alter the food intake of chicks, but cumulative food intake was significantly suppressed by orexin-B.
4. The orexin-B was then administered to chicks deprived of food for 3 h to confirm its; suppressive effect. No significant effect of orexin-B on food intake was detected.
5. Central injection of orexin-B did not modify food intake when appetite was stimulated, by fasting.
6. Neither of these orexins appears to stimulate feeding in chicks..
310. T Bungo, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, N Saito, K Sugahara, S Hasegawa, M Furuse, Effects of substitution of N-terminal amino acid of glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide on food intake of the neonatal chick, LIFE SCIENCES, 65, 24, PL295-PL299, 65(24):PL295-PL299, 1999.11, Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a member of glucagon superfamily, is synthesized from a large precursor, preproglucagon, and has been postulated to be a novel incretin. Recently, it was reported that central administration of GLP-1 (7-36) amide decreased food intake in rats and chickens. Generally, the amino acid sequences of the glucagon superfamily members except for gastric inhibitory peptide and growth hormone-releasing factor are identical at N-terminal histidine. It is well known that the GLP-1 receptor is highly specific for GLP-1 and does not bind other peptides of the glucagon superfamily. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether central injection of substituted GLP-1 in which N-terminal histidine of mammalian GLP-1 (7-36) amide was replaced with tyrosine, inhibits food intake in the chick. Intracerebroventricular administration of substituted GLP-1 inhibits food intake in the chick, although the effect of substituted GLP-1 was 11 to 13 fold less than that of mammalian GLP-1 (7-36) amide. These results indicate that N-terminal histidine of GLP-1 (7-36) amide is important for efficacy, but not essential for its bioactivity (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc..
311. Bungo T, Kawakami S.-I, Ohgushi A, Shimojo M, Masuda Y, Saito N, Sugahara K, Hasegawa S, Furuse M, Intracerebroventricularly administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 induces sleep-like behavior in the neonatal chick., Japanese Poultry Science, 36, 6, 377-381, 36(6):377-381, 1999.10.
312. Takashi Bungo, Yutaka Nakano, Kaoru Okano, Maki Hayashida, Hiroko Kawagoe, Hirotoshi Furusawa, Koichi Yasukochi, Takahiro Matsuishi, Kiyotaka Izumi, Masataka Shimojo, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Yasuhisa Masuda, Direction of jaw movement in dairy cattle during the rumination period, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 10.1016/S0168-1591(99)00037-4, 64, 3, 227-232, 64(3):227-232, 1999.07, Jaw movements in dairy cattle were observed during rumination. The direction of jaw movement was recorded to determine the frequency in three phases: the first jaw-opening movement (FJM) which serves to keep the major part of the bolus on one side of the oral cavity, the main jaw-opening and -closing movements (MJM), from the second movement to the penultimate one, which serve to repeatedly jumble and grind the bolus, and the last jaw-opening movement (LJM) which serves to prepare the bolus for swallowing. Five dairy cattle were monitored in trial 1 to record FJM, MJM and LJM, and 16 cows were monitored in trial 2 to record MJM. It was found that the direction of FJM and MJM during a single rumination period (time spent chewing one bolus) was a one-way movement, either left or right depending on the position of each bolus in the oral cavity (the storage side). However, the direction of MJM was opposite to that of FJM, because in the case of MJM, the jaw-opening activity scattered the bolus, so it moved from the storage side in the oral cavity and the jaw-closing activity ground it down while it was being moved from the other side to the storage side. Furthermore, it was found that the direction of MJM is not always the same from one rumination period to another. It was suggested from this study that dairy cattle tend to show jaw movement in a constant one-way direction, either left or right, when remasticating most of the boli during a given rumination period, but there were cases in which cattle changed the direction of jaw movement between rumination periods..
313. M Shimojo, T Bungo, Y Imura, M Tobisa, N Koga, T Shao, M Yunus, Y Nakano, Goto, I, M Furuse, Y Masuda, Accumulation of digestible materials with growth of forages and digestion of forage dry matter by in vitro incubation with rumen fluid and pepsin, JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE KYUSHU UNIVERSITY, 43, 3-4, 373-382, 1999.02, The present study was conducted to suggest an equation to the analysis of forage dry matter digestion by in vitro incubation with rumen fluid and pepsin, and also to suggest an equation, using digestion rate, to the analysis of decreases in dry matter digestibility [DDMD] with growth of forages. Forage digestion characteristics were relative digestion rate of dry matter [RDRW], degradation rate of lignin [DRL] and dry matter digestion per unit degradation of lignin [DWDL]. This method was applied to two tropical forages to evaluate (1) RDRW using DRL and DWDL, and (2) DDMD using RDRW. Accumulation of digestible materials and DDMD using accumulation rate with forage growth (Shimojo Bt al., 1998a, b, c, 1999) were also taken up and applied to the same tropical forages. Two different-type equations for DDMD suggested, roughly speaking, a sort of relationship between digestion characteristics of forage dry matter in ruminants and accumulation characteristics of digestible materials in forages..
314. M Shimojo, T Bungo, M Tobisa, Y Imura, N Koga, T Shao, M Yunus, Y Nakano, Goto, I, M Furuse, Y Masuda, Net assimilation rate of forages and forage intake of ruminants as related using a hypothetic equation suggested to growth analysis of both forages and ruminants, JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE KYUSHU UNIVERSITY, 43, 3-4, 365-371, 1999.02, In this study another-type hypothetic equation with three parameters, which was slightly different in the form from the previous equation (Shimojo et al., 1998b), was suggested to the growth analysis of both forages and ruminants. From the present hypothetic equation, absolute growth rate [AGR] and relative growth rate [RGR] of forages and those of ruminants were derived as special cases. In addition, when a certain substitution was made for parameters, AGR and RGR equations each were shown to be composed of daily forage intake [DFI] per animal or per unit body weight, net assimilation rate [NAR] per plant, and the term suggesting a sort of relationship between ruminant DFI and forage NAR. This relationship was suggested by adjusting growth period and yield of the forage to be equal to its feeding period and cumulative intake in the ruminant, respectively..
315. Denbow, D.M., Snapir, N. and Furuse, M., Inhibition of food intake by CRF in chickens, Physiology & Behavior, 10.1016/S0031-9384(98)00340-0, 66, 4, 645-649, 66(4):645-649, 1999.01.
316. Furuse, M., Ao, R., Bungo, T., Ando, R., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y. and Saito, N., Central gastrin inhibits feeding behavior and food passage in neonatal chicks, Life Sciences, 10.1016/S0024-3205(99)00249-0, 65, 3, 305-311, 65(3):305-311, 1999.01.
317. Bungo, T., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y., Choi, Y.-H., Denbow, D.M. and Furuse, M., Induction of food intake by a noradrenergic system using clonidine and fusaric acid in the neonatal chick, Brain Research, 10.1016/S0006-8993(99)01299-8, 826, 2, 313-316, 826(2):313-316, 1999.01.
318. Bungo, T., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y., Tachibana, T., Tanaka, S., Sugahara, K. and Furuse, M., Intracerebroventricular administration of mouse leptin does not reduce food intake in the chicken, Brain Research, 10.1016/S0006-8993(98)01223-2, 817, 1-2, 196-198, 817(1-2):196-198, 1999.01.
319. Bungo, T., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y., Saito, N., Sugahara, K., Hasegawa, S. and Furuse, M., Effect of naloxone on the anorexic action by glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) in the neonatal chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 36(2):109-115, 1999.01.
320. Furuse, M., Matsumoto, M., Pinontoan, R., Saito, N., Sugahara, K. and Hasegawa, S., Intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits water intake of the neonatal chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 36(4):229-235, 1999.01.
321. Bungo, T., Ando, R., Ao, R., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y., Choi, Y.-H., Saito, N. and Furuse, M., Influence of intracerebroventricular administration of morphine and kyotorphin on food intake of the neonatal chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 36(5):319-324, 1999.01.
322. Saito, N., Furuse, M., Sasaki, T., Arakawa, K. and Shimada, K., Effects of naloxone on neurohypophyseal peptide release by hypertonic stimulation in chicks, General and Comparative Endocrinology, 10.1006/gcen.1999.7302, 115, 2, 228-235, 115(2):228-235, 1999.01.
323. Mori, R., Okumura, J., Kasutani, Y., Sako, T. and Furuse, M., Effects of b-cyclodextrin on feeding behavior in rats and dogs, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 2(2):39-47, 1999.01.
324. Furuse, M., Kasutani, Y. and Sako, T., Prevention and amelioration of obesity by dietary b-cyclodextrin and cholestyramine in the dog, Journal of Pet Animal Nutrition, 2(2):48-52, 1999.01.
325. M Shimojo, T Bungo, Y Imura, M Tobisa, N Koga, S Tao, M Yunus, Y Nakano, Goto, I, M Furuse, Y Masuda, Mean leaf area of the canopy for light interception by forages and mean retention time of feed in the rumen for feed ingestion by ruminants as investigated using simple models, JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE KYUSHU UNIVERSITY, 43, 1-2, 111-118, 1998.11, This study was conducted to take up the following two subjects. (1) relationships between light interception by the forage canopy and its mean leaf area weighted by the light attenuation curve [MLA], and (2) relationships between feed ingestion by ruminants and mean retention time of feed in the rumen weighted by the feed disappearance curve [MRT], using simple models for forages and those for ruminants. The following results were suggested: (1) when the canogy leaf area index [L] was high the small coefficient of light extinction [K-f] enabled the canopy to have large MLA which could intercept more amount of light, whereas the saturation of light interception occurred in lower L when the canopy had large K-f, (2) daily feed intake [DFI] by ruminants increased with the increase in MRT-1 [=feed disappearance rate]. The present study using simple models suggested that MLA of the canopy of forages was like MRT-1 of feed in the rumen of ruminants as indices for the estimation of energy ingestion..
326. M Furuse, T Bungo, M Shimojo, Y Masuda, N Saito, S Hasegawa, K Sugahara, Effects of various N-terminal fragments of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) on food intake in the neonatal chick, BRAIN RESEARCH, 807, 1-2, 214-217, 807(1-2):214-217, 1998.10, Recently, the suppressive effect on food intake by the central administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been confirmed in both rats and chicks, The importance of the N-terminal amino acid, histidine, for the bioactivity of GLP-1(7-36) in the central nervous system was suggested, though the role for C-terminal amino acids in the central nervous system has not been reported, The present study was done to elucidate the central effect of N-terminal fragments of GLP-1(7-36) on food intake of the neonatal chick. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of mammalian GLP-1(7-36) inhibited food intake of chicks, hut the fragments of GLP-1(7-16) and GLP-1(7-26) did not show the suppressive effect on food intake. Furthermore, the extended fragments, GLP-1(7-30) and GLP-1(7-33), also had no effects on food intake. It is concluded that C-terminal amino acids of GLP-1(7-36) have an important role for the bioactivity in the central nervous system with special reference to feeding behavior. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved..
327. Furuse, M., Bungo, T., Shimojo, M., Masuda, Y., Saito, N., Hasegawa, S. and Sugahara, K., Influence of intracerebroventricular administration of exendin (9-39) on food intake of the newly-hatched chick, Japanese Poultry Science, 35(6):376-380, 1998.01.
328. Komaki, H., Yamashita, M., Niwa, Y., Tanaka, Y., Kamiya, N., Ando, Y. and Furuse, M., The effect of processing of chlorella (vulgaris: K-5) on in vitro and in vivo digestibility in rats, Animal Feed Science and Technology, 10.1016/S0377-8401(97)00089-8, 70, 4, 363-366, 70(4):363-366, 1998.01.
329. M Furuse, RT Mabayo, Y Miyachi, J Okumura, Effect of ketone bodies on crop emptying in the chicken, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 38, 4, 432-435, 1997.09, 1. The effect of ketone bodies on crop emptying was studied in chickens in 2 experiments. Tn the first, the effect of beta-hydroxybutyrate acetoacetate or acetone on relative crop content tvas measured. The effects of dietary medium and long chain triacyglycerols upon serum beta-hydroxybutyrate were investigated in the second.
2. beta-Hydroxybutyrate, but not acetoacetate and acetone, delayed crop emptying in a dose dependent fashion. Serum beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration was high in chicks given medium chain triacylglycerol, when compared with long chain triacylglycerol.
3. The results suggest that delayed crop emptying induced by medium chain triacylglycerol could partly br explained by an enhanced concentration of serum beta-hydroxybutyrate, which is the result of die rapid oxidation of medium chain fatty acids..
330. M Furuse, RT Mabayo, J Okumura, Effects of dietary cholestyramine on the utilisation of diets containing medium or long chain triacylglycerols by chicks, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 38, 4, 436-438, 1997.09, 1. The effects of graded dietary concentrations of cholestyramine (CSTY, a bile acid binding polymer), which prevents micelle formation and bile acid reabsorption. on the lipid and energy metabolism of chicks given diets containing different dietary concentrations of medium chain triacylglycerol (MCT) and long chain triacylglycerol (LCT) were investigated.
2. MCT-or LCT-supplemented diets containing 100 or 200 g oil/kg diet and 0, 10 or 20 g CSTY kg were fed to 7 d old chicks for 10 d. As dietary CSTY concentration increased, a reduction in the metabolisable energy value was observed for both dietary lipid sources. Consequently, fat and energy retentions were also reduced as the dietary CSTY content increased..
331. N Kawamoto, A Murai, J Okumura, M Furuse, Effects of prostaglandin E-2 analogue, enprostil, on lipid metabolism in mice, ASIAN-AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCES, 10, 4, 402-407, 1997.08, This study was conducted to investigate the effects of enprostil, a prostaglandin E-2 analogue, on liver triacylglycerol content and factors that regulate liver lipid metabolism in mice. Mice received vehicle or 10 mu g enprostil/kg body weight intraperitoneally every 6 h, and were killed at 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h after the first injection. Enprostil significantly lowered liver triacylglycerol content after 12 h of the first injection. However, the peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity was inconsistent with the result of liver triacylglycerol content, because its activity was lowered by enprostil. In another experiment, the effect of enprostil on lipid metabolism in mice was investigated in a short period. Mice received 10 mu g enprostil/kg body weight intraperitoneally, and were killed after 0, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min. After 30 min, malic enzyme activity was significantly increased by the administration of enprostil compared with the activity at 5 min after. No significant changes in liver camitine palmitoyltransferase and peroxisomal beta-oxidation activities were observed. Plasma free fatty acid concentrations were markedly reduced from 5 through 60 min after the administration of enprostil. Consequently, enprostil suppressive effect on liver triacylglycerol concentration might resut from the decreased entry of free fatty acid into the liver..
332. RT Mabayo, JI Okumura, M Furuse, Dietary flavor modifies oil preferences in the chicken, APPLIED ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR SCIENCE, 49, 3, 213-221, 1996.09, The effect of dietary flavor on the preference for diets containing 20% medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) or long-chain triacylglycerol (LCT) was investigated in the chicken. A series of experiments using birds pre-fed with a flavored basal pre-feeding diet or an MCT diet was done to identify the role of dietary flavor on the food selection of flavored LCT (FLCT) or flavored MCT (FMCT) in chickens. The basal pre-feeding diet contained 3% LCT and the MCT pre-feeding diet contained 20% MCT. Using FLCT or FMCT, the birds showed a significant preference for non-flavored diets over flavored diets. The pre-feeding diet changed the pattern of diet preference, which implies that chickens can be trained to prefer a diet which was disliked over another. It is concluded that flavor controls the preference of diets containing MCT or LCT in chickens..
333. RT Mabayo, J Okumura, A Hirao, S Sugita, K Sugahara, M Furuse, The role of olfaction in oil preference in the chicken, PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 59, 6, 1185-1188, 1996.06, The role of olfaction on the preference of diets containing 20% medium-chain (MCT) or long-chain triacylglycerol (LCT) was investigated in the chicken. Olfactory bulbectomized, sham-operated (Sham) or intact (Intact) birds were offered a choice between LCT or MCT diet and food intake was measured over a short time period. Intact and Sham groups showed a significant preference for LCT over MCT diet, but olfactory-bulbectomized chickens lost the preference for LCT over MCT. The bilateral cutting of the olfactory nerves confirmed the results taken in olfactory bulbectomy. It is concluded that olfaction plays a major role in the preference of diets containing MCT or LCT in chickens..
334. M Furuse, RT Mabayo, Effects of partially hydrolysed guar gum on feeding behaviour and crop emptying rate in chicks, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 37, 1, 223-227, 1996.03, 1. The effects of partially hydrolysed guar gum (PHGG) or intact guar gum (GG) on feeding behaviour and crop emptying rate in growing chicks were investigated.
2. Several combinations of dietary PHGG and GG at 50 g per kg diets were prepared for a feed intake experiment. Birds (17-d-old) were given diets for 3 h after 16 h fasting, and food consumption was measured at 1 h intervals. The food intake rapidly decreased as the dietary GG content increased even at 1 h after feeding.
3. The rate of food passage from the crop was also investigated with birds (20-d-old) after 16 h fasting. Birds were tube-fed diets having several ratios of dietary PHGG and GG. After 1 h of feeding, the diet remaining in the crop was measured after drying. The crop emptying rate decreased linearly as dietary PHGG concentration decreased.
4. The present study suggests that partial hydrolysis of dietary GG improve both feeding behaviour and food passage from the crop in growing chicks..
335. A Murai, M Furuse, J Okumura, Involvement of (n-6) essential fatty acids and prostaglandins in liver lipid accumulation in Japanese quail, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH, 57, 3, 342-345, 1996.03, Objective-To investigate the involvement of (n-6) essential fatty acids, such as linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)] or gamma-linolenic acid [18:3(n-6)], and of prostaglandins on liver lipid accumulation in Japanese quail.
Design-Effects of graded amounts of aspirin, which inhibits prostaglandin synthesis, on liver weight were determined in experiment 1. Experiment 2 was designed to clarify the effect of dietary essential fatty acid sources and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis on the liver fat and fatty acid profile.
Animals-Female Japanese quail.
Procedure-In experiment 1, from 1 to 3 weeks of age, birds were fed ad libitum the essential fatty acids-free or linoleic acid-adequate (2%) diets with graded amounts of aspirin (0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4%). In experiment 2, from 1 to 4 weeks of age, birds were fed the same amount of essential fatty acids-free, linoleic acid-adequate, or gamma-linolenic acid (0.4%) diets with (0.2%) or without aspirin.
Results-In experiment 1, in groups given the essential fatty acids-free diet, liver weight increased with an increase in dietary aspirin concentration. In experiment 2, gamma-linolenic acid completely prevented liver triacylglycerol and cholesterol accumulation induced by the essential fatty acids-free diet. Aspirin treatment significantly lowered plasma prostaglandin F-2 alpha concentration, but did not affect liver lipid concentrations. In groups fed the essential fatty acids-free diets, however, aspirin treatment increased liver weight and liver triacylglycerol concentration by 20 and 40%, respectively.
Conclusions-gamma-Linolenic acid or its metabolites, but not linoleic acid itself, are important factors in reducing fatty liver in Japanese quail with the essential fatty acids-deficient condition..
336. A MURAI, M FURUSE, J OKUMURA, ROLE OF DIETARY GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID IN LIVER LIPID-METABOLISM IN JAPANESE-QUAIL, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 36, 5, 821-827, 1995.12, 1. The importance of linoleic acid (18:2n-6) itself and of dietary gamma-linolenic acid (18:3n-6) as essential fatty acids (EFA) in Japanese quail were investigated with regard to liver lipid metabolism. Experimental diets were made by adding of 0, 2 or 4 g gamma-linolenic acid/kg, or 20 g linoleic acid/kg to an n-6 EFA-free diet. From 3 to 6 weeks of age, birds were fed equal amounts of experimental diets.
2. Liver weight and lipid content in birds fed the 2 and 4 g gamma-linolenic acid/kg diet were significantly lower than those in birds fed the gamma-linolenic acid-free diet. However, no significant difference was observed between the gamma-linolenic acid- and linoleic acid-supplemented diets.
3. In birds fed the 4 g gamma-linolenic acid/kg diet, the proportion of arachidonic acid in the liver lipid was similar to that in quail fed the 20 g linoleic acid/kg diet, implying a conversion rate from linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid of approximately 20% of whole body content.
4. It is concluded that linoleic acid itself is not essential for Japanese quail and that at least 2 g/kg of gamma-linolenic acid in the diet completely prevents liver enlargement accompanied by lipid accumulation..
337. S. Satoh, M. Furuse, J. Okumura, Factors influencing the intestinal phase of pancreatic exocrine secretion in the turkey, Experientia, 10.1007/BF01931106, 51, 3, 249-251, 1995.03, The present study was done to investigate the factors regulating the intestinal phase of exocrine pancreatic secretion in the turkey. The intestine of turkeys equipped with pancreatic fistulas was perfused with peptone solution, fat emulsion and hydrochloric acid (HCl), and pancreatic flow and protein output were measured. Neither peptone solution nor fat emulsion had any effects on pancreatic secretion. HCl enhanced the flow rate of pancreatic juice but not protein output. To clarify the neural mechanism of this phenomenon, the vagal postganglionic blocker atropine was continuously infused and pancreatic secretion in response to intestinal HCl was measured. Atropine completely suppressed both pancreatic flow and protein output. It is suggested that the avian intestinal phase of pancreatic secretion is mainly controlled by cholinergic action though HCl stimulation. © 1995 Birkhäuser Verlag Basel..
338. YH CHOI, M FURUSE, S SATOH, J OKUMURA, ENDOGENOUS CHOLECYSTOKININ IS NOT A MAJOR REGULATOR OF FOOD-INTAKE IN THE CHICKEN, JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY B-BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY, 164, 6, 425-429, 1994.12, This study investigated whether or not endogenous cholecystokinin exerts satiety effects in chickens. After several doses (O, 1, 2 and 4 mu g.kg body weight(-1)) of intravenous injection of caerulein, the bile flow was increased in a dose-dependent fashion. However, the pharmacological level of caerulein failed to suppress the food intake of chickens. Two potent stimulators of endogenous cholecystokinin, i.e., soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylalanine were administered to chickens before feeding and food intake was determined over 2 h. The soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylalanine did not alter food intake. Devazepide, a cholecystokinin-A receptor antagonist, significantly decreased amylase release from the dispersed chicken pancreatic acini stimulated by caerulein. However, devazepide did not improve food intake of the chicken. The results obtained suggest that endogenous cholecystokinin may not act as a satiety signal in chickens..
339. S SATOH, M FURUSE, YH CHOI, J OKUMURA, CHOLECYSTOKININ IS NOT A MAJOR REGULATOR IN THE DIGESTIVE-SYSTEM IN THE CHICKEN, EXPERIENTIA, 50, 9, 812-814, 1994.09, To find out whether physiological concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), a gastrointestinal hormone in mammals, are also active in chickens, the pancreatic amylase secretory response to CCK-8 was investigated in vitro. Rat pancreatic acini responded to the physiological concentration of CCK-8, but in chickens amylase release was induced at a concentration of CCK-8 1000 times higher than that observed in rats. In another experiment, biliary flow was tested with several doses of CCK-8. The bile flow was stimulated in a dose-dependent fashion, but a significant enhancement was not obtained at a concentration of 0.5 mu g CCK-8/kg body weight, which was considerably higher than physiological ones. It is concluded that endogeneous CCK does not have an important role in the digestive system in the chicken..
340. M FURUSE, C KIMURA, H TAKAHASHI, J OKUMURA, INFLUENCE OF DIETARY SORBOSE ON DIABETES IN NONOBESE DIABETIC MICE, COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-PHYSIOLOGY, 108, 1, 123-127, 1994.05, The effect of dietary sorbose on diabetes after the incidence of the syndrome in the nonobese diabetic mouse was investigated in the animals from 8 to 14 weeks of age. When sucrose (200 g/kg diet) in a control diet was replaced by sorbose, the body weight and the blood glucose concentration were significantly reduced, but the serum insulin concentration was unchanged. The urinary glucose concentration was the same for both sucrose and sorbose diets. It is suggested that after the incidence of diabetes, dietary sorbose could not improve urinary excretion of glucose, even though sorbose could reduce the blood glucose concentration..
341. RT MABAYO, M FURUSE, A MURAI, J OKUMURA, INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MEDIUM-CHAIN AND LONG-CHAIN TRIACYLGLYCEROLS IN LIPID AND ENERGY-METABOLISM IN GROWING CHICKS, LIPIDS, 29, 2, 139-144, 1994.02, The combined effects of dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCT) and long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT) on lipid and energy utilization in chicks were investigated. Corn oil was used as the LCT source, and trioctanoin (8:0) was used as the MCT source. The efficiency of dietary energy utilization (such as metabolizable energy values and fat and energy retention) decreased linearly as the level of MCT increased, but the efficiency of dietary protein utilization (protein retained per protein consumed) was not affected in a consistent manner. Fecal saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid composition was dependent on the dietary fatty acid composition, whereas fecal linoleic acid content was not. It is concluded that dietary MCT and LCT influence each other to some degree, with respect to protein and Lipid metabolism in chicks. Moreover, in most cases, the nutritional characteristics of each triacylglycerol, including food efficiency and fat and energy retention, are independent of each other in growing chicks..
342. K KITA, M FURUSE, SI YANG, J OKUMURA, INFLUENCE OF DIETARY SORBOSE ON LIPOGENESIS IN GOLD THIOGLUCOSE-INJECTED OBESE MICE, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BIOCHEMISTRY, 24, 2, 249-253, 1992.02, 1. The influence of dietary sorbose on food intake and fatty acid synthesis of the liver and epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) was investigated in gold thioglucose (GTG)-injected obese mice from 12 to 14 weeks of age.
2. Sorbose was supplemented to a semi-purified diet at a level of 200 g/kg diet at the expense of sucrose.
3. On the last day of the experiment, fatty acids synthesis in the liver and EWAT was measured using an i.p. injection [1-C-14]sodium acetate.
4. The decreases in body weight and food intake by dietary sorbose in GTG-injected obese mice were greater than those in control mice.
5. Lipid content and fatty acid synthesis in the liver and EWAT of control mice were not influenced by dietary sorbose.
6. In GTG-injected obese mice, the reduction of food intake by dietary sorbose suppressed fatty acid synthesis and lipid deposition in both liver and EWAT..
343. M. Furuse, S. Miyagawa, J. Nakagawa, Effect of dietary sorbitol on the performance of broilers, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071669108417413, 32, 4, 875-880, 1991.09, 1. The effect of dietary sorbitol on the performance of broilers was investigated. Male and female broilers were given a control diet or a sorbitol diet (100 g/kg diet) ad libitum from 29 to 57 d of age. 2. Body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency and the ME values of the diets were not significantly different. Absolute and relative weights of abdominal fat were significantly reduced in birds given the sorbitol diet. 3. Compared to the control diet, the diet containing sorbitol lowered the serum glucose, total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein concentrations. © 1991, Taylor &
Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved..
344. Yoshinaga Tamura, Satoshi Matsuda, Toshio Shimizu, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Jun-Ichi Okumura, Energy Utilization of Dietary Sorbose in Growing Rats, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 10.1021/jf00009a017, 39, 9, 1623-1626, 1991.09, The energy value of L-sorbose in rats was estimated. Sorbose was shown to be stable under incubation with 0.05 M hydrochloric acid (pH about 1.3, 37 °C, 120 min). The in vitro absorption rate of sorbose was lower than that of glucose. When 14C-labeled sorbose was injected intravenously (6.0 mg/100 g of body weight), about 50 % was excreted in urine and about 30 % was expired as CO2 in 24 h. 14C-Labeled sorbose or 14C-labeled glucose was orally administered (20 mg/100 g of body weight) to rats fed diets with or without antibiotics. The recovery of 14CO2 in glucose-administered rats was significantly higher than that of 14CO2 in sorbose-administered rats with or without antibiotics. The recovery of expired 14CO2 in rats without antibiotics was significantly higher than that of the corresponding antibiotics- treated group. Large amounts of sorbose were recovered in urine (16-19%) and feces (9-16%). The remainder which was not recovered in radioactivity after labeled sorbose doses would provide its full energy, so that available energy of sorbose for the rat could be calculated as about 1.3-2.2 kcal/g. © 1991, American Chemical Society. All rights reserved..
345. M FURUSE, C KIMURA, H TAKAHASHI, JI OKUMURA, PREVENTION OF THE INCIDENCE OF DIABETES BY DIETARY SORBOSE IN NONOBESE DIABETIC MICE, JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 121, 7, 1135-1138, 1991.07, The effect of dietary sorbose on the prevention of the incidence of diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse was investigated in animals from 5 to 11 wk of age. When sucrose (200 g/kg diet) in the control diet was replaced by sorbose, body weight was significantly reduced. The blood glucose level also was lowered in mice fed sorbose, but the serum insulin level was unchanged. Glucose was not detected in the urine of mice fed the sorbose diet during the experiment, but some mice in the control group excreted glucose in urine. Relative weights of the heart, liver and left kidney were significantly higher in mice fed the sorbose diet vs. those fed the control diet. The results suggest that dietary sorbose would benefit patients with diabetes by lowering blood glucose and inhibiting urinary glucose excretion..
346. M FURUSE, Y TAMURA, S MATSUDA, T SHIMIZU, J OKUMURA, FEEDING-BEHAVIOR IN GROWING RATS FED DIETS CONTAINING SORBOSE, PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 49, 6, 1247-1250, 1991.06, The effect of dietary sorbose on food and water consumption was investigated in growing rats. Rats (26-day old) were fed diets containing 0, 100, 200 or 300 g sorbose/kg diet for 5 weeks in Experiment 1. Daily food and water intakes were measured at day 0, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Absolute food intake (g) until day 21 decreased linearly with increasing sorbose levels and so did relative food intake (g/100 g b.wt.) until day 7. In contrast, relative water intake (ml/100 g b.wt.) and water:food intake ratio (ml/g) remained high by day 7 with increasing sorbose levels. In Experiment 2, the effect of sorbose on the short-term food intake was compared with those of glucose, sucrose and maltitol in growing rats (25-day old) at a level of 100 g/kg diet in order to investigate how quickly reduced food intake would be induced by sorbose consumption. Cumulative food intake was determined every hour for the first ten hours, then at two-hour intervals thereafter during the 24-hour period that followed feeding. As rapid as 6 hours after feeding, cumulative food intake significantly decreased in sorbose-fed animals compared with other dietary groups. It was concluded that sorbose consumption decreased the food intake of growing rats from 6 hours to a few weeks after feeding, but this inhibitory effect disappeared afterwards..
347. M FURUSE, SI YANG, N NIWA, YH CHOI, J OKUMURA, ENERGY-UTILIZATION IN GERM-FREE AND CONVENTIONAL CHICKS FED DIETS CONTAINING SORBOSE, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 32, 2, 383-390, 1991.05, 1. In experiment 1, growing conventional (CV) chicks were fed on diets containing graded amounts (0, 100, 200 and 300 g/kg diet) of sorbose from 4 to 14 d. Protein, fat and energy deposition were determined after carcase analysis. The values for growth, food efficiency, metabolisable energy (ME) and fat and energy depositions declined as the dietary sorbose content increased.
2. In experiment 2, the performances of germ-free (GF) and CV chicks fed on diets with (100 g sorbose/kg diet) or without sorbose were investigated. On both diets, body weight gain, food consumption and protein accumulation in GF chicks were significantly higher than those in CV birds. No significant differences were observed between the dietary treatment except for ME values, which were significantly lower for the sorbose diet.
3. It is suggested that dietary sorbose decreased energy utilisation, and that the microbial contribution to the utilisation of dietary sorbose was negligible in the chicken..
348. Yoshinaga Tamura, Satoshi Matsuda, Toshio Shimizu, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Jun-ichi Okumura, Energy utilization of sorbose in comparison with maltitol in growing rats, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 10.1021/jf00004a022, 39, 4, 732-735, 1991.04, Energy utilization of L-sorbose was investigated in two experiments. In experiment 1, growing rats were fed a control diet containing cornstarch as a carbohydrate or glucose, sucrose, sorbose, and maltitol for 6 weeks at 10% level. Dietary sorbose appeared to be an inefficient source of energy compared with other dietary carbohydrate sources except for maltitol, because there were significant decreases in values for body weight gain, food efficiency, body lipid accumulated, and total energy accumulated. In experiment 2, [U-14C]sorbose was administered (200 mg/kg of body weight) to sorbose-adapted and -unadapted rats, and [U-14C]maltitol was administered to maltitol-adapted rats. Both adaptation levels were 900-1000 mg/kg of body weight and were done for 1 week. The recovery of radioactivity of expired CO2 in sorbose-adapted rats was significantly lower and 60% of that in maltitol-adapted counterparts. Both urinary and fecal excretions of radioactivity were significantly increased in [U-14C] sorboseadministered rats compared to in [U-14C]maltitol-administered animals. Fecal recovery of radioactivity in sorbose-adapted rats was less than in sorbose-unadapted rats. © 1991, American Chemical Society. All rights reserved..
349. M FURUSE, SI YANG, N NIWA, J OKUMURA, EFFECT OF SHORT CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS ON THE PERFORMANCE AND INTESTINAL WEIGHT IN GERM-FREE AND CONVENTIONAL CHICKS, BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 32, 1, 159-165, 1991.03, 1. In experiment 1, the performance and tissue weights of germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) chicks fed on diets containing 25.4 g acetic acid/kg diet (AD) or 25.4 g kaolin/kg diet (KD) were investigated. Body weight gain in GF chicks was significantly higher on the AD, but significantly lower on the KD compared with their CV counterparts. The values for food efficiency, protein retention and energy retention followed a similar pattern to that of the body weight gain.
2. The weights of all sections of the intestine except the colon were significantly greater in CV chicks. In CV but not in GF birds the jejunum and ileum were heavier from birds fed on the AD than from those on the KD diet.
3. In experiment 2, the influence of butyric acid administration on the weight of some organs in chicks was investigated. The weight of duodenum, jejunum and ileum was significantly increased by intraperitoneal administration of butyric acid (2 ml of 100 mM solution/d) for 4 d, but no significant effect was observed by oral administration.
4. It might be suggested that short chain fatty acids such as acetic and butyric acids formed by bacterial action in the crop and subsequently absorbed are at least partly responsible for the heavier gut weight in CV birds..
350. M FURUSE, T ISHII, S MIYAGAWA, J NAKAGAWA, T SHIMIZU, T WATANABE, JI OKUMURA, EFFECT OF DIETARY SORBOSE ON LIPID-METABOLISM IN MALE AND FEMALE BROILERS, POULTRY SCIENCE, 70, 1, 95-102, 1991.01, Male and female broilers were given diets (6 males and 6 females per diet) containing varying percentages of sorbose (0,3,6 and 9%) and fed for ad libitum access from 28 to 56 days of age. Body weight gain and feed intake were decreased with increasing dietary sorbose, particularly in male birds fed diets containing 9% sorbose, although feed efficiency and N retention rate were not influenced by dietary treatments. Absolute and relative abdominal fat weights were higher in females than in males and decreased with the increasing levels of dietary sorbose in both sexes. Fat content in the pectoral muscle also decreased as dietary sorbose increased. Dietary sorbose did not have significant effects on serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density liprotein, very low density lipoprotein, and chylomicron levels in either male or female birds. The ME values of diets decreased as dietary sorbose increased. Palmitic acid content of abdominal fat was significantly lower in birds fed the 9% sorbose diet than in birds fed the control diet. The reverse was true for linoleic acid content. It was concluded that dietary sorbose can be used as a potential regulator of lipid deposition in broilers..
351. M FURUSE, SI YANG, T MURAMATSU, J OKUMURA, ENHANCED RELEASE OF CHOLECYSTOKININ BY SOYBEAN TRYPSIN-INHIBITOR IN CHICKENS, SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, 25, 12, 1242-1246, 1990.12.
352. M FURUSE, SI NAKAJIMA, J NAKAGAWA, T SHIMIZU, JI OKUMURA, REGULATION OF LIPID-METABOLISM BY DIETARY SORBOSE IN LAYING HENS, POULTRY SCIENCE, 69, 9, 1508-1512, 1990.09.
353. M FURUSE, J OKUMURA, EFFECT OF DIETARY ACETIC-ACID LEVELS ON PROTEIN AND ENERGY-UTILIZATION IN CHICKS, POULTRY SCIENCE, 68, 6, 795-798, 1989.06.
354. T MURAMATSU, O TAKASU, M FURUSE, J OKUMURA, EFFECT OF DIET TYPE ON ENHANCED INTESTINAL PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS BY THE GUT MICROFLORA IN THE CHICK, JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 118, 9, 1068-1074, 1988.09.
355. T. Muramatsu, S. Nakajima, M. Furuse, I. Tasaki, J. Okumura, Influence of the Gut Microflora on Fasting Heat Production in Chicks, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071668808417055, 29, 2, 301-309, 1988.06, 1. The influence of the gut microflora on fasting heat production in chicks was investigated. 2. Single Comb White Leghorn chicks were fed on an adequate diet from 2 to 12 d of age and then fasted for 3 d. Fasting heat production was estimated from changes in body composition and energy content of droppings from days 1 to 3 of fasting. Measurements of body temperature and plasma thyroxine concentration were also made. 3. Body fat content was consistently higher in germ-free (GF) chicks than in conventional (CV) counterparts during the starvation period, whereas no difference was found in body protein content. The GF birds had a significantly higher body temperature than the CV controls with no change in plasma thyroxine concentration. 4. It was concluded that estimated fasting heat production of chicks was increased by the absence of the gut microflora. © 1988, Taylor &
Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved..
356. M. Furuse, H. Yokota, Effect of the Gut Microflora on Chick Growth and Utilisation of Protein and Energy at Different Concentrations of Dietary Protein, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071668508416791, 26, 1, 97-104, 1985.01, 1. The effect of the gut flora on chick growth and protein and energy utilisation at a marginal dietary energy level (calculated metabolisable energy value 11.7 MJ/kg) was determined with diets containing 227 or 293 g protein/kg. 2. Germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) chicks were reared for 10 d on the diets, and excreta were collected during the last 4 d. The chicks were killed and carcases and droppings were analysed for N and fat. 3. The GF chicks grew significantly faster than the CV controls on both diets. The growth of CV chicks given the high protein diet was similar to that of GF chicks given the adequate protein diet. 4. Protein and energy utilisation were significantly less for CV than for GF chicks on both diets. 5. It was concluded that the energy requirement of CV chicks was greater than that of their GF counterparts, and that their poorer growth was due to utilisation of some dietary protein as an energy source. © 1985, Taylor &
Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved..
357. M. Furuse, H. Yokota, I. Tasaki, Influence of Energy Intake on Growth and Utilisation of Dietary Protein and Energy in Germ-Free and Conventional Chicks, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071668508416827, 26, 3, 389-397, 1985.01, 1. The effect of metabolisable energy (ME) intake on the growth and utilisation of dietary protein and energy in germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) chicks was investigated in two experiments. 2. In experiment 1 a high energy diet (HED, 14.8 kj ME/g) and a marginally-adequate energy diet (AED, 11.7 kJ ME/g) were fed to the GF and CV chicks at 240 g/2 birds/10 d. 3. In experiment 2 a diet with 13.7 kJ ME/g was fed at 118 g (low level, LL) or 128 g (high level, HL)/bird/10 d. 4. Body weight gain, protein retention and protein retention rate were similar in GF and CV chicks on both AED and HED in the first experiment, but in the second were higher in GF than in CV chicks. The increased ME intake of the CV chicks in experiment 2 may be too small to compensate for the increased requirement. 5. ME intake was significantly higher in the CV chicks than in the GF chicks, whereas energy retention was similar in both groups. © 1985, Taylor &
Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved..
358. M. Furuse, H. Yokota, Effect of the gut microflora on the size and weight of organs of chicks fed diets of different protein content, British Poultry Science, 10.1080/00071668408454884, 25, 3, 429-439, 1984.01, 1. Germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) chicks were reared for 14 d on diets containing 50 (LD), 200 (AD) and 400 (HD) g protein/kg. Food and water were provided ad libitum. The size and weight of the proven-triculus, gizzard, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caeca, colon, liver, pancreas, heart, spleen, adrenal glands and kidneys were measured, and liver composition was examined. 2. The absolute and relative (weight/kg body-weight) weights of the intestine of C V chicks fed AD and HD diets were greater than those of GF chicks. The LD diet did not affect the absolute and relative weights of the duodenum and ieiunum. 3. The absolute weight, relative weight and fat content of the liver of GF chicks given LD diet were greater than those of their CV counterparts. 4. The size and weight of some organs are affected by the diet (dietary protein content)-microflora-host interaction. © 1984, Taylor &
Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved..