Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Papers
toshihiro - ona Last modified date:2021.05.28

Associate Professor / Sustainable Resources Science / Department of Agro-environmental Sciences / Faculty of Agriculture


Papers
1. Jyunichi - Ohshima,Kazuya - Iizuka,Futoshi - Ishiguri,Toshihiro - Ona, Representative heights for assessing whole-tree values of cell-type proportions in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, Journal of Forest Research, 10.1007/s11676-018-00871-z, 1-16, 2019.02, Representative heights for assessing whole-tree values of cell-type proportions in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus.
2. Junko - Johzuka,Toshihiro - Ona, Development of universal method for skin stimulus determination by epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensory system for homeostasis maintenance, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 23, 2, 47-52, 2018.12, Development of universal method for skin stimulus determination by epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensory system for homeostasis maintenance.
3. Junko - Johzuka,Toshihiro - Ona,Masatoshi - Nomura, One Hour in vivo-like phenotypic screening system for anti-cancer drugs using a high precision surface plasmon resonance device, Analytical Sciences, 34, 10, 1189-1194, 2018.10, One Hour in vivo-like phenotypic screening system for anti-cancer drugs using a high precision surface plasmon resonance device.
4. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Teruyuki - Seino, New 1h phenotypic screening allows efficacy and toxicity evaluation for anti-liver cancer against Chinese chive extract, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 21, Supplement, 126-126, 2016.12, New 1h phenotypic screening allows efficacy and toxicity evaluation for anti-liver cancer against Chinese chive extract.
5. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Akio - Hayakawa, Tsukasa - Nagao, New 1h phenotypic screening allows efficacy and toxicity evaluation for anti-pancreatic cancer against extract of sprout-forcing grape seeds, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 20, Supplement, 146-146, 2015.12, New 1h phenotypic screening allows efficacy and toxicity evaluation for anti-pancreatic cancer against extract of sprout-forcing grape seeds.
6. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Development of universal method in skin stimulus measurement using epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensor system for homeostasis maintenance-Feasibility study-, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 20, Supplement, 125-125, 2015.12, Development of universal method in skin stimulus measurement using epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensor system for homeostasis maintenance-Feasibility study-.
7. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Rapid in vivo-like phenotypic assay of epidermis pro-turnover efficacy with toxicity by gold kiwi fruit grown in Saga prefecture, Japan, The 23rd International Congress on Nutrition and Integrative Medicine (ICNIM 2015), 187-189, 2015.07, Rapid in vivo-like phenotypic assay of epidermis pro-turnover efficacy with toxicity by gold kiwi fruit grown in Saga prefecture, Japan..
8. Jyunichi - Ohshima, Kazuya - Iizuka, Futoshi - Ishiguri, Shinso - Yokota, Toshihiro - Ona, Relationship between various extracted basic densities and cell morphology in Eucalyptus, International Symposium on Wood Science and Technology 2015 (IAWPS 2015), 5FS-P25-5FS-P25, 2015.03, Wood density is an important index for mechanical and pulp properties of wood. However, it is affected by the existence of extraneous compounds. Here, the relationship between various extracted basic densities and cell morphology were investigated by their within-tree variations in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus grown at the same site of Western Australia with the age of 14. For various extracted basic densities, examined were for basic density (BD), extractives-free basic density (EF-BD), alkali-extractives-free basic density (AF-BD), total-extractives-free basic density (TF-BD), and extraneous compounds-free basic density (ECF-BD). For cell morphology, investigated were fiber, vessel, apotracheal and paratracheal axial parenchyma cells, proportion of cell types, and derived wood properties. In E. camaldulensis, BD had significant negative relationships with fiber length, and tangential diameter and wall thickness in paratracheal axial parenchyma only (example of BD vs wall thickness of paratracheal axial parenchyma in Fig. 1, r=-0.530**), while EF-BD, TF-BD, and ECF-BD had the relationships with many cell morphology. In E. camaldulensis, BD was influenced by the presence of extraneous compounds and did not clearly reflect the cell morphology. In E. globulus, almost all fiber and vessel morphology had significant correlations with all basic densities (example of BD vs fiber wall thickness in Fig. 2, r=0.585**), whereas apotracheal and paratracheal axial parenchyma cell morphology had low or no correlations. Vessel percentage did not relate to all basic densities, although other proportion of cell types significantly related to them. Highly significant correlations were obtained between derived wood properties and all basic densities. In contrast to E. camaldulensis, E. globulus showed distinctly high correlations between almost all cell morphology and all basic densities. From these, in E. globulus, BD expresses cell morphology well without the disturbance by extraneous compounds. Based on the obtained results, between-species difference was clearly observed for two eucalypt species grown at the same site with the same age in the relationship between BD and cell morphology. Our results will help the usage of BD and extracted BDs for wood and pulp & paper industries..
9. Junko - Shibata, Toshihiro - Ona, Development of in vivo-like cell-based screening system for rapid and quantitative toxicity and efficacy predictions against epidermis activation, Drug Discovery 2014, 85-85, 2014.09, Animal test is widely used for compound toxicity and evaluation although the results obtained are different from human clinical test even using a monkey.
For in vitro compound screening against epidermis activation, cocultivation of keratinocyte with a target compound is often hired since animal test is inhibited for cosmetic development in EU. The 3D cell culture is performed using extracellular matrix and additionally fibroblast cells from dermis to reconstitute skin structure. However, this requires long time culture duration (ca. 1 month) because the method is based on endpoint. Furthermore, it will not allow simultaneous determination of toxicity of apoptosis and necrosis, and efficacy. Moreover, the cell activity decreases during long term culture causing low experimental repeatability.
We have developed a custom-made human cell-based assay device, High-Precision Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR), and in vivo-like method for anti-cancer drug screening. This monitors early stage of mitochondrial response to stimuli within live cells giving endpoint toxicity and efficacy predictions rapidly (ca. 1 hour) without cell culture.
We proved HP-SPR validity for prediction of target compound toxicity and efficacy at physiological concentration for epidermis activation, and successfully established new in vivo-like test..
10. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, New in vivo-like chemosensitivity test for physiological concentration of anti-cancer drug: Rapid and reliable prediction within 1 h., Drug Discovery 2014, 75-75, 2014.09, Conventional technology of in vivo-like test for anti-cancer drug screening is based on expensive endpoint assay of 3D cell culture with extracellular matrix necessitating time-consuming experimental process and labeling agents causing interference with a target compound that provide low reliability. The previous device methods depend on the pharmaceutical mode of action, and give no relation to the conventional method. And a separate set of experiment is required to obtain both efficacy and toxicity results. Our new technology overcomes these all problems sensing dynamic cellular reaction against target compound(s) by laser.
The technological break points are as follows.
1. New device is developed for real-time monitoring of mitochondrial polarization status within live cells without both labeling and invasion.
2. Early mitochondrial polarization change rate after addition of target compound (s) is revealed as a key to quantitatively predict the final compound efficacy and toxicity against live cells.
3. 3D cell activity is obtained by conditioning 2D attached cells covered by extracellular matrix for short time with no cell division..
11. Junko - Shibata, Shouhei - Yano, Teruyuki - Seino, Toshihiro - Ona, Anti-liver cancer effect of Chinese chive using in vivo-like test, The 22nd International Congress on Nutrition and Integrative Medicine (ICNIM 2014), 49-49, 2014.07, Chinese chive is a perennial herb belonging to Allium genus cultivated BC era in China. In Japan, it is introduced in old book Manyoshu in 8th century. In herbal medicine, dried leaves of Chinese chive are used as called Kyusai. The efficacy spectrum is widely reported in tonicity, recover from exhaustion, improvements in vascular flow and cholesterol, preventions in arteriosclerosis and myocardial infarct, pro-body temperature, prevention and suppression in tumors, anti-microbial and so on.
As active compounds, Chinese chive contains sulphuric amino compounds of methin and aliin, vitamins C, A and E, minerals of Ca、K、Mg、Se、Fe、P, chlorophylls and dietary fibers.
In Japan, Chinese chive is cultivated from Hokkaido to Okinawa. In Hokkaido, Shiriuchi town in Oshima district is top for the production using a brand name of “Kitano Hana” with 1,700t/y. The first picking leaves are thick and sweat and attract customers with increased handling volume. Shiriuchi town is eager to add more values to “KitanoHana”and has started various projects.
On the other hand, in a liver, absorbed food compounds are directly works against a liver first. After this, metabolized compounds within a liver with chemical modification work against a liver secondary.
In active compound evaluation, physiological concentration results are demanded equally as in vivo. For this, in vivo-like chemosensitivity test is often hired using 3D cell culture with extracellular matrix. However, this requires time-consuming experimental process with 2-4 weeks and labeling agents causing misjudge, and has difficulty in simultaneous efficacy and toxicity measurement. We conquered all these problems with development of High Precision-Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR) device and applications.
Here we examined and conformed the nature of extract from Chinese chive for anti-cancer efficacy and toxicity against liver before and after their metabolism within liver as real-time manner by HP-SPR..
12. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Activation of skin by AHCC: comparison between whole and low molecular weight fraction., The 22nd International Congress on Nutrition and Integrative Medicine (ICNIM 2014), 33-33, 2014.07, Skin aging has intrinsic and extrinsic processes. Intrinsic process is derived from genetic factors such as chronicle age and reduction in estrogen. Extrinsic one is from environmental factors such as exposure to sunlight and pollutants, and diet. These generate free radicals (ROS). When ROS amount exceeds cell scavenging capacity, the oxidative stress occurs.
The oxidative stress at epidermis accelerates the formation of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) by protein glycation of plasma membrane. AGE inhibits SOD activity, reduces DNA repair ability and stability, mitochondrial function, cell division and delays cell cycle and migration, and induces apoptosis. This implies the decrease in cell metabolism.
As a result, epidermis becomes thin with 10-50% reduction by atrophy of stratum spinosum. Furthermore, the skin glycation reduces skin elasticity. These increase skin vulnerability and fragility and decrease in desquamation to delay wound healing and in replacement speed of lipids to disturb barrier function.
The compound screening for epidermis activation often hires cocultivation of keratinocyte with a target compound. On the other hand, 3D cell culture is reported with the use of extracellular matrix and even with fibroblast cells from dermis to reconstitute skin. However, this necessitates long time culture duration (ca. 1 month) because of endpoint method, and has difficulty in simultaneous determination of efficacy and toxicity. Moreover, the reduction in cell activity causes low experimental repeatability by long term culture.
We developed a custom-made instrument and method to monitor early stage of mitochondrial response to stimuli within live cells utilizing High-Precision Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR) as a measurement principle. This brings endpoint efficacy and toxicity predictions extremely before endpoint without cell culture.
At last ICNIM meeting, we elucidated the validity of AHCC for pro-skin turnover. This time, we report on the validity difference by comparison between whole and low molecular weight fraction of AHCC..
13. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Akio - Hayakawa, Shinya - Sakamoto, Rapid in vivo-like cell-based assay of epidermis pro-turnover efficacy with toxicity by homogenized Kiwi fruits, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 19, Supplement, 174-174, 2014.12, [Background and Objectives] The compound screening against epidermis pro-turnover often utilizes cell-based assay. For this, keratinocyte cells of epidermis basal layer are cocultivated with a target compound. However, 2D cell culture requires practically high concentration of a target compound. On the other hand, 3D cell culture gives low experimental repeatability by long test duration (ca. 1 month) causing cell activity decrease. Furthermore, both will not allow determining compound efficacy and toxicity in one experimental setup. To conquer these issues, we developed an original rapid in vivo-like cell-based assay system using high-precision surface plasmon resonance (HP-SPR) as a measurement principle. We successfully applied this to rapid assay of epidermis pro-turnover efficacy with toxicity without cell culture. Here we report epidermis pro-turnover efficacy with toxicity of homogenized Kiwi fruits using HP-SPR system.
[Materials and Methods] Gold Kiwi fruits grown in Saga prefecture of Japan were used after homogeneity treatment including allergen break-down, such as pressing after peel off, sterilization by heat and enzymatic decomposition. A cell line of human keratinocyte PSVK1 was hired as cells. The 2D cultured cells were self-attached on an HP-SPR sensor chip surface, and they were layered by collagen to activate cells into in vivo-like condition. The cell response was collected as an HP-SPR signal change after the compound addition for 80 min.
[Results and Discussion] The efficacy of epidermis pro-turnover was observed at 5.0 (v/v) most, dose-dependently. However, higher concentrations from 10.0 (v/v) gave no efficacy, but extremely low toxicity with major dysfunction of mitochondria mode and minor general apoptosis mode.
[Conclusions] We elucidated that homogenized Kiwi fruits showed extremely high efficacy and extremely low toxicity for epidermis pro-turnover using rapid new in vivo-like cell-based assay of HP-SPR system.
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14. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, A plan for development of universal method in skin stimulus measurement using epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensory system for homeostasis maintenance, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 19, Supplement, 162-162, 2014.12, A plan for development of universal method in skin stimulus measurement using epidermal keratinocyte mitochondria as a forefront of sensory system for homeostasis maintenance
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15. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Cell-based rapid and quantitative toxicity and efficacy monitoring in consecutive before and after the compound metabolism within liver for two ginger compounds at physiological concentration, ALTEX Proceedings, 3, 1, 24-24, 2014.08, [Objectives] Animal test is often used for compound toxicity and efficacy evaluation although the results obtained are different from clinical test and show total metabolism [1]. We have developed an original human cell-based assay device, High-Precision Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR), and method [2,3]. Here we examined the applicability of HP-SPR to elucidate toxicity and efficacy including metabolism of two ginger compounds as examples working against liver before and after their metabolism.
[Methods] Human liver cell Hep G2 was used for two ginger compounds of 6-shogaol (SHOG) and 6-gingerol (GING). The 2D cultured cells were self-attached to an HP-SPR sensor chip surface and covered by collagen to obtain in vivo like cell status [3], and monitored.
[Results] In SHOG (heated GING), the efficacy of liver activation was observed at 100nM. This activation was twice higher in after metabolism than in before metabolism. Apoptotic effect as toxicity was observed at 1000nM to inhibit liver activation before the metabolism. However, after the metabolism, its effect was revered and detoxification was processed. In GING, 100nM showed apoptotic effect as toxicity before and after the metabolism, and no effect was observed below 100nM. The different mode of action was successfully monitored between two ginger compounds.

1. Damia G, D'Incalci M. Eur J Cancer, 2009; 45:2768-2781.
2. Ona T, Shibata J. Anal Bioanal Chem, 2010; 398:2505-2533.
3. Ona T. WO 2013/039112 A1..
16. Yasui - Kojima, Yoshiaki - Kato, Yukiko - Ishikura, Seung-Lak - Yoon, Toshihiro - Ona, Photoyellowing of chemically modified chemithermomechanical pulps (CTMP) from Eucalyptus globulus under various atmospheres, HOLZFORSCHUNG, 10.1515/hf-2013-0086, 68, 2, 143-149, 2014.02, Chemithermomechanical pulps (CTMP) were prepared from Eucalyptus globulus and photoirradiated, and the responses have been examined by means of ultraviolet (UV) microspectrophotometer. The absorbance in the UV spectra of fiber walls increased in the range of 300 of 350 nm as a result of photoirradiation, indicating the formation of conjugated double
-bound systems in the fiber walls. These spectral changes occurred only on the irradiated surface of sheets. CTMP photoirradiation under various atmospheres indicated that the presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere is not necessary for CTMP yellowing. In nitrogen or vacuum, photoyellowing was at the same level as observed under oxygen. This observation was interpreted as a result of direct elimination of proton radicals from free phenolic groups and/or cleavage of β-aryl ether linkages. This induced probably the excited triplet state of α-carbonyl structures in CTMP, which leads to chromophore formation in the absence of oxygen. Reduction of CTMP with sodium borohydride impeded effectively the effects of photoirradiation only in the absence of oxygen. On the contrary, acetylation of CTMP had no effect in the absence of oxygen but led to photobleaching in the presence of oxygen..
17. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Rapid and quantitative efficacy prediction of bioactive compound for skin turnover with toxicity at physiological concentration - Evaluation within 1 h -, Alternatives to Animal Testing and Experimentation, 121, 18 (Supplement), 226-226, 2013.12, [Background and Objectives] Conventional chemosensitivity test is designed for efficacy prediction of target bioactive compound(s) using cell culture technique supplemented with the bioactive compound(s). In case of bioactive compound evaluation at physiological concentration to achieve in vivo like condition, it is based on three dimensional (3D) cell culture necessitating time-consuming experimental procedure for about 2-4 weeks and labeling agents, sometimes causing low reliability of compound efficacy prediction. We conquered this by a custom-made instrument and method to monitor early stage of mitochondrial response to stimuli within live cells utilizing High-Precision Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR) as a measurement principle. Here we examined the applicability of HP-SPR for evaluation of skin turnover using the candidate compounds.
[Materials and Methods] A cell line of human keratinocyte PSVK1 was used for bioactive compound candidates of trans-resveratrol (RESV) and AHCC (Active Hexose Correlated Compound). Self-attached 2D cultured cells on an HP-SPR sensor chip were covered by collagen to activate cells into in vivo like status and subsequently monitored HP-SPR signal change after the compound addition for 1 h.
[Results and Discussion] In RESV, the efficacy of skin turnover enhancement was observed at 220nM most, dose-dependently. However, apoptotic effect as toxicity was revealed at 2200nM On the other hand, in AHCC, 50 µg/mL was most effective and 300 µg/mL showed apoptotic effect as toxicity, dose-dependently. In both compounds, effective conc. ranges were in blood conc. level. The efficacy of skin turnover was almost 4 times higher in AHCC than in RESV. In human keratinocyte cell, the cell reaction was activated into in vivo like status by this method similarly as before.
[Conclusions] We proved HP-SPR validity as a label-free, rapid and reliable new chemosensitivity test for prediction of bioactive compound efficacy at physiological concentration for skin turnover with toxicity and successfully established new in vivo like test.
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18. Junko - Shibata, Toshihiro - Ona, Development of label-free, rapid and reliable efficacy prediction of anti-cancer drug at physiological concentration using high-precision surface plasmon resonance, The Twelfth Asian Conference on Analytical Sciences (ASIANALYSIS XII), 3H3-AM6-3H3-AM6, 2013.08, Conventional chemosensitivity test is designed for efficacy prediction of target drug(s) using cell culture technique supplemented with the drug(s). In case of drug evaluation at physiological concentration to achieve in vivo like condition, it is based on three dimesion (3D) cell culture and endpoint assay necessitating time-consuming experimental procedure for about 2-4 weeks and labeling agents, sometimes causing low reliability of drug efficacy prediction.
We previously developed label-free cell-based sensing technology of High-Presision Surface Plasmon Resonance (HP-SPR) for new chemosensitivity test using second dimension (2D) cultured cells within 1 h after the addition of the drug regardless to the mode of action [1]. We achieved this by a custom-made instrument and method to monitor early stage of mitochondrial response to stimuli within live cells utilizing HP-SPR as a measurement principle. Furthermore, we have found mitochondrial polarization status change rate quantitatively implied endpoint cell status.
In the present study, we examined validity of HP-SPR for evaluation of anti-cancer drugs at physiological concentration to perform in vivo like test, using pancreatic cancer cell lines. To accomplish this, self-attached 2D cultured cells on a sensor chip were covered by extracellular matrix to activate cells into in vivo like status and subsequently monitored HP-SPR signal change after the drug addition for 1 h. The obtained HP-SPR signal change rate correlated to cell viability by conventional 3D cell culture chemosensitivity test of collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test [2].
Consequently, we proved HP-SPR validity as a label-free, rapid and reliable new chemosensitivity test for prediction of drug efficacy at physiological concentration regardless to the mode of action and successfully established new in vivo like test.
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19. Toshihiro - Ona, Junko - Shibata, Activation of skin by AHCC, The 21st International Congress on Nutrition and Integrative Medicine (ICNIM 2013), 76-76, 2013.07, We successfully developed a rapid, high sensitive, label-free and non-invasive cell-based sensing technology for reliable efficacy prediction of bioactive compounds at physiological concentration within 1 h regardless to the mode of action.
Conventional technology is based on endpoint assay of 3D cell culture with extracellular matrix necessitating time-consuming experimental process and labeling agents causing interference with a target compound that provide low reliability. This will not allow the simultaneous prediction of efficacy and toxicity. Alternative method using specialized device such as impedance monitoring depends on the pharmaceutical mode of action, and gives no relation to the conventional method.
New technology is brought by a custom-made instrument and method to monitor early stage of mitochondrial response to stimuli utilizing high-precision surface plasmon resonance as a measurement principle. And we have found mitochondrial polarization status change rate quantitatively implied endpoint cell status. From these, we overcome all problems described above and achieved prediction of endpoint cell status as efficacy and toxicity against target compound(s) correlating to conventional cell-based chemosensitivity test.
Expected applications for compound screening are anti-cancer, -Alzheimer disease and -aging (skin care), diabetes, pro-fat burning, -metabolism, -hair restoration and -body temp, even suitable in case of DDS.
We report the application of our new technology for skin activation by AHCC.
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20. toshihiro - ona, Shibata, J., Label-free, rapid and reliable new cell-based assay for physiological concentration of anti-cancer and anti-metabolic syndrome compounds: evaluation within 1h, Journal of Pharmacological Sciences, 121, Supplement 1, 159-159, 2013.03, We successfully developed a label-free, rapid, high sensitive and non-invasive new cell based assay for reliable efficacy prediction of anti-cancer and anti-metabolic syndrome compounds in physiological concentration. This allows monitoring dynamic mitochondrial polarization status as cellular reaction against target compounds (including combined use) and predicts the compound efficacy within 1 h after the addition regardless to the mode of action. Conventional cell-based assay is based on endpoint assay necessitating time-consuming experimental procedure and labeling agents sometimes causing interference with a target compound that bring low reliability of the efficacy prediction. Genomics and proteomics depend on the pharmaceutical mode of action, and give little quantitative relation to the standard cell-based assay, especially in polypharmacy. New cell-based assay overcomes these all problems. Features are: 1) Easy handling, 2) Medium exchange free, 3) Rapid prediction of endpoint cell status against target compound(s), 4) Label-free detection, 5) limited cells used (ca 1000), 6) High reliability in polypharmacy, and 7) Correlation to conventional cell-based assay..
21. toshihiro - ona, Shibata, J., Label-free, rapid and reliable new chemosensitivity test for physiological concentration of anti-cancer drug: evaluation within 1h, Journal of Pharmacological Sciences, 121, Supplement 1, 132-132, 2013.03, Conventional chemosensitivity test for physiological concentration of anti-cancer drug is based on 3D cell culture and endpoint assay necessitating time-consuming experimental procedure for about 2-4 weeks and labeling agents, sometimes causing low reliability of drug efficacy prediction. We successfully developed label-free cell-based sensing technology, HP-SPR, for this purpose using 2D cultured cells within 1 h after the addition of drug regardless to the mode of action. In the present study, we examined validity of HP-SPR for evaluation of anti-cancer drugs (doxorubicin and paclitaxel) at physiological concentration, using pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1). To achieve this, self-attached 2D cultured cells on a sensor chip were covered by collagen for several hours and subsequently monitored HP-SPR signal change after the drug addition for 1 h. The obtained HP-SPR signal change rate correlated to cell viability by conventional 3D cell culture chemosensitivity test of CD-DST and proved its validity as a label-free, rapid and reliable new chemosensitivity test for prediction of drug efficacy at physiological concentrations regardless to the mode of action..
22. toshihiro - ona, New chemosensitivity test for physiological concentration of anti-cancer drug: Rapid and reliable prediction within 1 h, The 71st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association, 54-54, 2012.09, We successfully developed a rapid, high sensitive, label-free and non-invasive cell-based sensing technology for reliable efficacy prediction of anti-cancer drugs in physiological concentration. This technology senses dynamic cellular reaction against target drugs (including combined use) and determines their efficacy within 1 h after the drug addition regardless to the pharmaceutical mode of action.
Conventional technology is based on endpoint assay necessitating time-consuming experimental process and labeling agents causing interference with a target drug that provide low reliability. It depends on the pharmaceutical mode of action, and gives no relation to the standard chemosensitivity test, especially in multipharmacy. New technology overcomes these all problems.
Features are: (1) Real-time monitoring of mitochondrial polarization status, (2) Prediction of endpoint cell status as cell activity change against target drug(s), and (3) Correlating to conventional cell-based chemosensitivity test.
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23. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Feasibility study of quality plantation pulpwood breeding on fibre length, vessel element length and their ratio sought by within-tree variations in Eucalyptus trees, Forestry Studies, 54, 37-47 , 2011.10.
24. Ona, T. and Shibata, J., Advanced dynamic monitoring of cellular status using label-free and non-invasive cell-based sensing technology for the prediction of anti-cancer drug efficacy, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 398, 6, 2505-2533, 2010.06.
25. Nishijima, H., Kosaihira, A., Shibata, J. and Ona, T., Development of signaling echo method for cell-based quantitative efficacy evaluation of anti-cancer drugs in apoptosis without drug presence using high-precision surface plasmon resonance sensing, Analytical Sciences, 26, 5, 529-534, 2010.05.
26. Mizumoto, M., Shimokita, E., Ona, T., Seino, T., Ishida, Y. and Ohtani, H., Rapid and direct characterization of total fatty acids in wood by thermochemolysis-gas chromatography – flame ionization detector / mass spectrometry with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, Vol. 87 (1): 163-167, 2010.01.
27. Kojima, M., Yamamoto, H., Okumura, K., Ojio, Y., Yoshida, M., Okuyama, T., Ona, T., Matsune, K., Nakamura, K., Ide, Y., Marsoem, S. N., Sahri, M. H., Hadi, Y. S., Effect of the lateral growth rate on wood properties in fast-growing hardwood species, Journal of Wood Science, Vol. 55 (12): 417-424, 2009.12.
28. Yokota, S., Ohta, T., Kitaoka, T., Ona, T. and Wariishi, H., Preparation of cellobiose-conjugated polyacrylamide and its interaction with a cellulose matrix for papermaking application, Sen’i Gakkaishi, Vol. 65 (8): 212-217, 2009.08.
29. Yokota, S., Ohta, T., Kitaoka, T., Ona, T. and Wariishi, H., Preparation and characteristics of anionic polyacrylamides containing direct dye with a high affinity for cellulose, BioResources, Vol. 4 (2): 497-508, 2009.02.
30. Shibata, J., Kosaihira, A. and Ona, T., Rapid and quantitative method for evaluating the personal therapeutic potential of pancreatic cancer drugs, World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2008, 68th International Congress of FIP, 182, 2008.08.
31. Ona, T., Nishijima, H., Kosaihira, A. and Shibata, J., Rapid and quantitative method for evaluating the therapeutic potential of liver cancer drugs, World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2008, 68th International Congress of FIP, 181, 2008.08.
32. Shibata, J., Kosaihira, A. and Ona, T., Development of cell-based quantitative evaluation method and instrument on personal therapeutic potential of cancer drugs for apoptosis by high precision surface plasmon resonance sensor, Third International Conference “Smart Materials, Structures and Systems”, 105, 2008.06.
33. Ona, T. and Murakami, S., Development of cavity mirror enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CMERS), Third International Conference “Smart Materials, Structures and Systems”, 104, 2008.06.
34. Kosaihira, A. and Ona, T., Rapid and quantitative method for evaluating the personal therapeutic potential of cancer drugs, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Vol. 391 (5): 1889-97, 2008.05.
35. Shibata, J. and Ona, T., Development of wave-guided surface plasmon spectrometer for cancer drug efficacy evaluation aiming personal therapy, Photonics Europe 2008, 66, 2008.04.
36. Ona, T., Nishijima, H., Kosaihira, and A. Shibata, J., Development of cell-based quantitative evaluation method for cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs for apoptosis by high precision surface plasmon resonance sensor, Photonics Europe 2008, 60, 2008.04.
37. Kojima, Y., Isaji, S., Yoon, S-L. and Ona T., Selection criteria of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. for production of chemithermomechanical pulps (CTMP), Holzforschung, Vol. 62 (1): 71-76, 2008.01.
38. Ona, T., Shibata, J. and Kosaihira, A., Quantitative prediction of therapeutic potential of cancer drugs including pharmacokinetic interactions for apoptosis by monitoring mitochondrial polarity, Cell Polarity, 112, 2007.12.
39. Ona, T. and Kosaihira, A., Quantitative screening method and instrumentation of polyphenol for apoptotic efficacy against cancer including pharmacodynamic interactions, Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, Vol. 41 (Supplement): 80, 2007.11.
40. Shibata, J., Masaki, T. and Ona, T., Quantitative prediction of anti-cancer efficacy of polyphenols by AKT and ERK1/2 down regulation, Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, Vol. 41 (Supplement): 78, 2007.11.
41. Shibata, J., Masaki, T. and Ona, T., Quantitative prediction of cancer drug efficacy by AKT and ERK1/2 down regulation in pancreatic cancer, European Journal of Cancer Supplements, Vol. 5 (4): 82, 2007.09.
42. Ona, T. and Kosaihira, A., Quantitative prediction of therapeutic potential of cancer drugs including pharmacokinetic interactions for apoptosis in 5 min, European Journal of Cancer Supplements, Vol. 5 (4): 72, 2007.09.
43. Kojima, Y., Isaji, S., Yoon, S-L. and Ona T., Selection criteria of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. for production of chemithermomechanical pulps (CTMP), Holzforschung, Vol. 62: 71-76, 2008.01.
44. Murakami, S., Ona, T., Seino, T., Sato, H. and Tao, H., Rapid and easy measurement of solid polystyrene molecular weights by Raman spectroscopy, The 20th International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy, 483, 2006.08.
45. Kosaihira, A., Mizumoto, K., Tanaka, M. and Ona, T., Identification of molecular mechanism of apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway detected by surface plasmon resonance, 20th IUBMB International Congress of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and 11th FAOBMB Congress , 444, 2006.06.
46. Ona, T., Yoshioka, A., Kojima, Y., Seino, T., Mizumoto, M., Nozaki, H., Ishida, Y. and Ohtani, H., Characterization of lignin structure in chemithermomechanical pulp predicting photo-yellowing level by pyrolysis-gas chromatography with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, 2006 Pan Pacific Conference - Advances in Pulp & Paper Sciences and Technologies - , 173-176, 2006.06.
47. Ishida, Y., Goto, K., Yokoi, H., Tsuge, S., Ohtani, H., Sonoda, T. and Ona, T., Direct analysis of phenolic extractives in wood by thermochmolysis-gas chromatography in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, Vol. 78: 200-206, 2006.05.
48. Masaki, T., Ona, T., Mizumoto, K. and Tanaka, M., Mechanism of apoptosis induced by trans-resveratrol in human pancreatic cancer cell line, MIA PaCa-2, International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies, 307, 2005.12.
49. Murakami, S., Ona, T., Seino, T., Sato, H., and Tao, H., Rapid characterization of solid polystyrene molecular weight by using Raman spectroscopy, International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies, 120, 2005.12.
50. Murakami, S. and Ona, T., Toward the online quantification of nano-particle-diameter of polymers in suspensions by Raman spectroscopy, International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies, 118, 2005.12.
51. Kosaihira, A., Ona, T., Mizumoto, K., and Tanaka, M., Rapid and non - label cell - based screening method for anticancer drug by surface plasmon resonance, International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies, 41, 2005.12.
52. Ona, T., Quality breeding by tree selection with high performance for paper recycling in Eucalyptus globulus, 6th Pacific Regional Wood Anatomy Conference, 85, 86, 2005.12.
53. Ohta, T., Yokota, S., Kitaoka, T., Wariishi, H., and Ona, T., Preparation and Wet-End Performance of Cellobiose-Pendant Polymer, International Symposium on Wood Science and Technology (IAWPS 2005), 374, 375, 2005.11.
54. Murakami, S., Saito, K., Fukushima, K., and Ona, T., Effect of Deuterium Exchange for the Rapid Lignin Structural Analysis by FT-Raman Spectroscopy, International Symposium on Wood Science and Technology (IAWPS 2005), 372, 373, 2005.11.
55. Mizumoto, M., Nozaki, H., Seino, T., Ona, T., Ishida, Y., and Ohtani, H., Rapid characterization of total fatty acids in wood by thermochemolysis-gas chromatography with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, International Symposium on Wood Science and Technology (IAWPS 2005), 64-67, 2005.11.
56. Murakami, S., and Ona, T., Quantification of nano-particle-diameter of polymers in suspensions by Raman spectroscopy, Colloquium Spectroscopicum Internationale XXXIV, 322, 2005.09.
57. Kosaihira, A., Ona, T., Mizumoto, K., and Tanaka, M., Rapid and non-label method for quantification of therapeutic potential of anticancer drug by surface plasmon resonance in the use of living cancer cells, Colloquium Spectroscopicum Internationale XXXIV, 294, 2005.09.
58. Murakami, S., Ona, T., Seino, T., Sato, H., and Tao, H., Rapid determination of solid polystyrene molecular weights by Raman spectroscopy, Colloquium Spectroscopicum Internationale XXXIV, 59, 2005.09.
59. Ona, T., and Murakami, S., Rapid quantification on nano-particle-diameter of polystyrene latex suspensions by Raman spectroscopy, 8th SPSJ international Polymer Conference (IPC 2005), 188, 2005.07.
60. Murakami, S., Ona, T., Seino, T., Sato, H., and Tao, H., Rapid molecular weight characterization of solid polystyrene by Raman spectroscopy, 8th SPSJ international Polymer Conference (IPC 2005), 187, 2005.07.
61. Ohta, T., Yokota, S., Kitaoka, T., Wariishi, H., and Ona, T., Wet-end interaction of cellulose-affinity molecules as retention promoter, 59th APPITA Annual conference & Exhibition, 293-296, 2005.05.
62. Kojima, Y., Ishikura, Y., Isaji, S., and Ona, T., Variation in photo-yellowing of CTMP from E. globulus by chemical modification, 59th APPITA Annual conference & Exhibition, 187-190, 2005.05.
63. Ona,T., Kawana, J., Kibatani, Y., Tateishi, M., Seino, T., Ishikura, Y., Kojima, Y., Nozaki, H., and Okayama, T., Tree selection with high performance for paper recycling in Eucalyptus globulus, 59th APPITA Annual conference & Exhibition, 203-206, 2005.05.
64. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T. , Representative heights for assessing whole-tree values and the within-tree variations of derived wood properties in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, Wood and Fiber Science, 37, 1, 51-65, Vol. 37: 51-65, 2005.01.
65. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Examination of within-tree variations and the heights representing whole-tree values of derived wood properties for quasi-non-destructive breeding of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus as quality pulpwood, Journal of Wood Science, 10.1007/s10086-004-0625-3, 51, 2, 102-111, Vol. 51: 102-111, 2005.01.
66. Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi, K., Yokota, S., and Yoshizumi, N. , In situ determination of cell morphology in trees by Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy, International Symposium on Wood Sciences, 46, 2004.10.
67. Tateishi, M., Seino, T., Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi, K., Yokota, S., and Yoshizawa, N., Rapid assessment of vessel anatomical features by pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Eucalyptus in a changing world, International IUFRO Conference of the WP2.08.03 on Silviculture and Improvement of Eucalyptus, 674-676, 2004.10.
68. Ona, T., Tateishi, M., Nozaki, H., Seino, T., yoon, S-L., Isaji, S., and Kojima, Y., Feasibility stydy of tree selection for high pulp yield and high brightness before and after heat exposure for recyclable chemithermomechanical paper production using Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus in a changing world, International IUFRO Conference of the WP2.08.03 on Silviculture and Improvement of Eucalyptus, 207-208, 2004.10.
69. Ona, T., Kawano, J., Kibatani, Y., Ishikura,Y., Kojima, Y., Nozaki, H., Tateishi, M., Seino, T., and Okayama, T., Toward the construction of efficient link between forest recycling and paper recycling using tree selection strategies with high performance for paper recycling in Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus in a changing world, International IUFRO Conference of the WP2.08.03 on Silviculture and Improvement of Eucalyptus, 205-206, 2004.10.
70. Tateishi, M., Seino, T., Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi, K., Yokota, S., and Yoshizawa, N., Rapid Assessment of Vessel Morphology by pyrolysis-gas chromatography, 16th International Symposium on Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 147, 2004.05.
71. Mizumoto, M., Seino, T., Ona, T., Ishida, Y., and Ohtani, H., Characterization of total fatty acids in wood by reactive thermal desorption-gas chromatography with tetrabuthylammonium hydroxide, 16th International Symposium on Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 87, 2004.05.
72. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T, Within-tree variation of vessel morphology and frequency and representative heights for estimating whole-tree values in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus., Appita Journal, 57, 1, 64-69, Vol. 57: 64-69, 2004.01.
73. Seino, T., Yoshioka, A., Takai, M., Kojima, Y., Ishikura, Y., Ona, T., Ishida, Y. and Ohtani, H., Characterization of photo-yellowing trigger compounds repressing paper recyclability., Transactions of the Materials Research Society of Japan, Vol. 29: 2093-2096, 2004.01.
74. Ona, T., Tateishi, M., Nozaki, H., Seino, T., Yoon, S.-L., Isaji, S. and Kojima, Y., Feasibility study of tree selection for high pulp yield, brightness and recyclable paper production., Transactions of the Materials Research Society of Japan,, Vol. 29: 2455-2458, 2004.01.
75. Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi,K., Yokota, S. and Yoshizawa, N., Length determination of vessel elements in tree trunks used for water and nutrient transport by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 10.1007/s00216-004-2856-y, 380, 7-8, 958-963, Vol. 380: 958-963, 2004.01.
76. Watanabe, Y., Kojima, Y., Ona, T., Asada, T., Sano, Y., Fukazawa, K. and Funada, R., Histochemical study on heterogeneity of lignin in Eucalyptus species II. The distribution of lignins and polyphenols in the walls of various cell types., IAWA Journal, 25, 3, 283-295, Vol. 25: 283-295, 2004.01.
77. Ito, K., Kato, T. and Ona, T., Rapid viscosity determination of waterborne automotive paint emulsion system by FT-Raman spectroscopy., Vibrational Spectroscopy, 10.1016/j.vipspec.2003.12.017, 35, 1-2, 159-163, Vol. 35: 159-163, 2004.01.
78. J. Ohshima, S. Yokota, N. Yoshizawa and T. Ona,, Within-tree variation of vessel morphology and frequency and representative heights for estimating whole-tree values in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, Appita Journal, 57, 1, 64-69, Vol. 57: 64-69, 2004.01.
79. T. Okuyama, H. Yamamoto, J. Doldan and T. Ona, Heart splitting at crosscutting of Eucalyptus logs, Journal of Wood Science, 10.1007/s10086-003-0533-y, 50, 1, 1-6, Vol. 50: 1-6, 2004.01.
80. J. Ohshima, S. Yokota, N. Yoshizawa and T. Ona, Within-tree variation of detailed fibre morphology and its position representing the whole-tree value in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E.globulus, Appita Journal, 56, 6, 476-482, 56: 476-482, 2003.12.
81. Murakami, S., Ona, T., Sakai, K., Saito, K. and Fukushima, K., Effect of deuterium exchange in lignin on its structural analysis using FT-Raman spectroscopy, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 164-169, 2003.11.
82. Haisaki, H., Tateishi, M., Seino, T., Sakai, K., Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi, K., Yokota S. and Yoshizawa, N., Assessment of vessel anatomical feature in Eucalyptus camaldulensis by pyrolysis-gas chromatography, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 159-163, 2003.11.
83. Ona, T., Kawana, J., Kibatani, Y., Ishikura, Y., Kojima, Y. and Okayama, T., Toward the construction of efficient link between forest recycling and paper recycling using trees with high performance for paper recycling, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 155-158, 2003.11.
84. Ona, T., Tateishi, M., Nozaki, H., Seino, T., Yoon, S-L., Isaji, S. and Kojima, Y., Feasibility Study of Tree Selection for High Pulp Yield, Brightness and Recyclable Chemithermomehanical Paper Production using Eucalyptus globulus, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 150-154, 2003.11.
85. Mizumoto, M., Seino, T., Sakai K., Ona, T., Ishida, Y. and Ohtani, H., Rapid characterization of total fatty acids in wood by reactive thermal desorption-gas chromatography with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 146-149, 2003.11.
86. Kosaihira, A., Fukumori, T., Sakai, K. and Ona, T., A new combination device comprised of surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy for a rapid screening of anticancer phenolic compounds, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 137-139, 2003.11.
87. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Rapid assessment of vessel morphology by pyrolysis-gas chromatography, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 124-128, 2003.11.
88. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Representative heights assessing whole-tree values and the within-tree variations of derived wood properties in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 119-123, 2003.11.
89. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Within-tree variation of vessel morphology and frequency and representative heights for estimating the whole-tree values in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 114-118, 2003.11.
90. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Within-tree variation of detailed fiber morphology and its position representing the whole-tree value in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 109-113, 2003.11.
91. Ibuki, T., Tokida, Y., Matsuda, N., Czempinski, K., Muller-Roeber, B., Ona T. and Uozumi, N., Characterization of potassium channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 98-100, 2003.11.
92. Okayama, T., Kibatani, Y., Nakayama, K., Kojima Y. and Ona, T., Fiber properties and papermaking potential of recycled Acacias pulp, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 83-90, 2003.11.
93. Seino, T., Yoshioka, A., Takai, M., Kojima, Y., Ishikura, Y., Ona, T., Ishida, Y. Ohtani, H. and Tsuge S., Characterization of photo-yellowing trigger compounds repressing paper recyclability of Eucalyptus globulus by Pyrolysis-GC/MS, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 78-82, 2003.11.
94. Kojima, Y., Isaji, S. and Ona T., Production of high brightness CTMP from Eucalyptus globulus and their light-induced color reversion, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 71-77, 2003.11.
95. Yokota, S., Nakayama, K., Sagawa, A., Urabe, F., Ona, T., Asada, T. and Yoshizawa, N., Possible effects of properties in polyphenol oxidases on rooting ability of Eucalyptus camaldulensis cutting shoots, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 52-53, 2003.11.
96. Ishiguri, F., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Radial variation of cell morphology in three acacia species, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 36-38, 2003.11.
97. Yoshizawa, N., Ishiguri, F., Yokota, S. and Ona, T., Formation and structure of reaction wood fibers forming no G-layer in some hardwood species, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 33-35, 2003.11.
98. Ona, T., Overview of the project “Development of forest resources with high performance for paper recycling, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 3-7, 2003.11.
99. Yamamoto, H., Kojima, Y., Okuyama, T., Ona, T. and Okayama, T., An essay on the fine structure of the wood cell wall related to the physical properties of the recycled paper, 4th Symposium on the Improvement of Forest Resources for Recyclable Forest Products, 12-16, 2003.11.
100. Seino, T., Yoshioka, A., Takai, M., Kojima, Y., Ishikura, Y., Ona, T., Ishida, Y., Ohtani, H. and Tsuge, S., Characterization of photo-yellowing trigger compounds repressing paper recyclability, 8th IUMRS International Conference on Advanced Materials, 2003.10.
101. Ona, T., Yoon, S-L., Isaji, S. and Kojima, Y., Tree selection feasibility for high pulp yield brightness and recyclable paper production without bleaching., 8th IUMRS International Conference on Advanced Materials, 2003.10.
102. Ito, K., Kato, T. and Ona, T., Nondestructive viscosity determination of waterborne automotive paint emulsion system by FT-Raman spectroscopy., 2nd International Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy, 2003.08.
103. Kosaihira, A., Fukumori, T., Sakai, K. and Ona, T., A new combination device comprised of Surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy for rapid screen of anticancer compounds., 2nd International Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy, 236, 2003.08.
104. Seino, T., Yoshioka, A., Takai, M., Kojima, Y., Ishikura, Y., Ona, T., Ishida, Y., Ohtani, H. and Tsuge, S., Detection of p-hydroquinone in phot-yellowing paper from CTMP of Eucalyptus globulus by pyrolysis-GC/MS., 11th International Symposium on Wood and Pulping Chemistry, 2003.06.
105. Ona, T., Ohshima, J., Adachi, K., Yokota, S. and Yoshizawa, N., A rapid quantitative method to assess Eucalyptus wood properties for kraft pulp production by FT-Raman spectroscopy., 11th International Symposium on Wood and Pulping Chemistry, Vol. 2: 87-90, 2003.06.
106. H. Yokoi, T. Nakase, Y, Ishida, H. Ohtani, S. Tsuge, T. Sonoda and T. Ona, Discriminative analysis of Eucalyptus camaldulensis grown from seeds of various origins based on lignin components measured by pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 32: 389-393, 2003.03.
107. Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T., Within-tree variation of detailed fibre morphology and its position representing the whole-tree value in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus., Appita Journal, 56, 6, 476-482, Vol. 56: 476-482, 2003.01.
108. Yokoi, H., Nakase, T., Goto, K., Ishida, Y., Ohtani, H., Tsuge, S., Sonoda, T. and Ona, T., Rapid characterization of wood extractives in wood by thermal desorption-gas chromatography in the presence of tetramethylammonium acetate., Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, Vol. 67: 191-200, 2003.01.
109. T. Ona, J. Ohshima, K. Adachi, S. Yokota and N. Yoshizawa, A rapid quantitative method to assess Eucalypus wood properties for kraft pulp production by FT-Raman spectroscopy, Journal of Plup and Paper Science, 29, 1, 6-10, 29: 6-10, 2003.01.
110. K. Ito, T. Kato and T. Ona,, Non-destructive method for the quantification of the average particle diameter of latex as water-based emulsions by near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, 10.1002/jrs.860, 33, 6, 466-470, 33:466-470, 2002.06.
111. T. Seino, T. Ona, A. Yoshioka, M. Takai and M. Tabata, Thermal-induced hemolytic scission of interunitary bonds in the lignin solution, Analytical Sciences, 17 (Supplement): i523-i526, 2001.12.
112. T. Sonoda, T. Ona, H. Yokoi, Y. Ishida, H. Ohtani and S. Tsuge, Quantitave analysis of detailed lignin monomer composition by pyrolysis-gas chromatography combined with preliminary acetylation of the samples, Analytical Chemistry, 73: 5429-5435, 2001.11.
113. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, Y. Tamai, Y. Kojima, J. Ohshima, S. Yokota and N. Yoshizawa, Investigation of relationships between cell and pulp properties in Eucalyptus by examination of within-tree property variations, Wood Science and Technology, 2001.06.
114. N. Uozumi, K. yamada, S. Goshima, T. Ona and S. Oiki, Sodium blocking induced by a point mutation at the C-terminal end of the pore helix of KAT1 channel, Journal of Membrane Biological, 181: 163-170, 2001.06.
115. K Ito, T. Kato and T. Ona, Improvement of reproducibility for quantitative analysis of real world samples by NIR FT-Raman spectroscopy using a thermal box, Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, 32: 389-393, 2001.05.
116. Sonoda, T., Ona, T., Yokoi, H., Ishida, Y., Ohtani, H. and Tsuge, S., Novel quantitative analysis of detailed lignin monomer composition by pyrolysis-gas chromatography combined with preliminary acetylation of the samples., Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 73: 5439-5435, 2001.01.
117. H. Yokoi, T. Nakase, Y. Ishida, H. Ohtani, S. Tsuge, T. Sonoda and T. Ona, Discriminative analysis of Eucalyptus camaldulensis grown from seeds of various origins based on lignin components measured by pyrolysis-gas chromatography., Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 57: 145-152, 2001.01.
118. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito and M. Shibata, Effect of alkali extraction on the lignin monomeric composition in Eucalyptus, Journal of Wood Science, 46: 410-413, 2000.10.
119. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K, Ito, M. Shibata, Y. Ootake, Y. Tamai and J. Kojima, Rapid prediction of pulp properties by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of native wood, Journal of Pulp and Paper Science, 26: 43-47, 2000.02.
120. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, Y. Ootake, J. Ohshima, S. Yokota and N. Yoshizawa, Quantitative FT-Raman spectroscopy to measure wood cell dimensions, Analyst, 124: 1477-1480, 1999.10.
121. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, Y. Ootake, J. Ohshima, S. Yokota and N. Yoshizawa, Rapid determination of cell morphology in Eucalyptus wood by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Applied Spectroscopy, 53: 1078-1082, 1999.09.
122. T. Ona and S.Tsuda, Plant protoplast isolation from sterile Acacia mangium seedlings requires β-1, 3-glucanase, Journal of Plant Physiology, 155: 110-113, 1999.07.
123. H. Yokoi, Y. Ishida, H. Ohtani, S. Tsuge, T. Sonoda, and T.Ona, Characterization of within-tree variation of lignin components in Eucalyptus camaldulensis by pyrolysis - gas chromatography, The Analyst, 124: 699-674, 1999.05.
124. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, Y. Ootake, J. Ohshima, S. Yokota and N. Yoshizawa, In situ determination of proportion of cell types in woods by FT-Raman spectroscopy, Analytical Biochemistry, 268: 43-48, 1999.03.
125. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, T. Kato and Y. Ootake, Determination of wood basic densities by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology, 18: 367-379, 1998.09.
126. T. Ona, T, Sonoda, K. Ito and M. Shibata,, Relationship between various extracted basic densities and wood components in Eucalyptus globulus, Journal of Wood Science, 1998.06.
127. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, T. Kato and Y. Ootake, Non-destructive determination of hemicellulosic neutral sugar composition in native wood by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology, 18: 43-51, 1998.01.
128. T. Ona, T. Sonoda, K. Ito, M. Shibata, T. Katayama, T. Kato and Y. Ootake, Non-destructive determination of lignin syringyl/guaiacyl monomeric composition in native wood by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology, 18: 27-41, 1998.01.