Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Reports
Nobuhiro Hata Last modified date:2021.07.26

Lecturer / Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University / Neurosurgery / Kyushu University Hospital


Reports
1. Nobuhiro Hata, Raymund L. Yong, Joy Gumin, Frank Marini, Rui-Yu Wang, Michael Andreeff, Frederick Lang, PDGF-beta mediates the tropism of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for malignant gliomas, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.9, No.4, p.592, 2007.10.
2. Raymund L. Yong, Juan Fueyo, Frank Marini, Nobuhiro Hata, Joy Gumin, Michael Andreeff, Frederick F. Lang, Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGD in the treatment of malignant glioma, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.9, No.4, p.591, 2007.10.
3. Nobuhiro Hata, Raymund Yong, Joy Gumin, Frank Marini, Raymond Sawaya, Michael Andreeff, Frederick Lang, Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for glioma therapy: In vivo functional analyses using bioluminescence imaging, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.9, No.4, p.592, 2007.10.
4. Frederick Lang, Toshiyuki Amano, Nobuhiro Hata, Joy Gumin, Kenneth Aldape, Howard Colman, Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are recruited to and alter the growth of human gliomas, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.9, No.4, p.596, 2007.10.
5. Raymund L. Yong, Joy Gumin, Nobuhiro Hata, Juan Fucyo, Frank Marini, Michael Andreeff, Frederick Lang, HUMAN BONE-MARROW DERIVED MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS HARBORING DELTA-24-RGD INHIBIT GLIOMA GROWTH AND IMPROVE MOUSE SURVIVAL AFTER SYSTEMIC DELIVERY, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.10, No.5, p.900, 2008.10.
6. Frederick F. Lang, Toshiyuki Amano, Nobuhiro Hata, Amy Heimberger, Joy Gumin, Frank Marini, Michael Andreeff, Kenneth Aldape, Erik Sulman, Howard Colman, TUMOR-DERIVED MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN HUMAN GLIOMAS, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.11, No.2, p.230, 2009.04.
7. Masahiro Mizoguchi, Daisuke Kuga, Yanlei Guan, Nobuhiro Hata, Koji Yoshimoto, Tadahisa Shono, Tomio Sasaki, GENOMEWIDE ANALYSIS OF LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY IN GLIOBLASTOMA USING THE SNP MAPPING ARRAY AND THE PCR WITH MULTIPLE MICROSATELLITE MARKERS, NEURO-ONCOLOGY, Vol.11, No.6, p.930, 2009.12.
8. Relationship between MR Findings and Genetic Alterations in Glioblastomas.
9. Yusuke Funakoshi, Nobuhiro Hata, Daisuke Kuga, Ryusuke Hatae, Yuhei Sangatsuda, Yutaka Fujioka, Kosuke Takigawa, Masahiro Mizoguchi, Update on chemotherapeutic approaches and management of bevacizumab usage for glioblastoma, Pharmaceuticals, 10.3390/ph13120470, Vol.13, No.12, pp.1-21, 2020.12, Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor in adults, has one of the most dismal prognoses in cancer. In 2009, bevacizumab was approved for recurrent glioblastoma in the USA. To evaluate the clinical impact of bevacizumab as a first-line drug for glioblastoma, two randomized clinical trials, AVAglio and RTOG 0825, were performed. Bevacizumab was found to improve progression-free survival (PFS) and was reported to be beneficial for maintaining patient performance status as an initial treatment. These outcomes led to bevacizumab approval in Japan in 2013 as an insurance-covered first-line drug for glioblastoma concurrently with its second-line application. However, prolongation of overall survival was not evinced in these clinical trials; hence, the clinical benefit of bevacizumab for newly diagnosed glioblastomas remains controversial. A recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of bevacizumab combined with temozolomide in recurrent glioblastoma also showed an effect only on PFS, and the benefit of bevacizumab even for recurrent glioblastoma is controversial. Here, we discuss the clinical impact of bevacizumab for glioblastoma treatment by reviewing previous clinical trials and real-world evidence by focusing on Japanese experiences. Moreover, the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab are summarized, and we provide suggestions for updating the approaches and management of bevacizumab..