Kyushu University Academic Staff Educational and Research Activities Database
List of Reports
Andrew John Chapman Last modified date:2022.04.21

Associate Professor / Multiscale Science and Engineering for Energy and the Environment Thrust / International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research


Reports
1. Prioritizing mitigation efforts considering co-benefits, equity and energy justice: Fossil fuel to renewable energy transition pathways
© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable energy (RE) is one of the core strategies in developing sustainable future energy systems. But in planning such a transition, it is common to consider primarily cost and greenhouse gas reduction, as typified by cost-mitigation curves that have become widespread. Such assessments tend to leave important considerations of energy justice on the periphery. This paper puts forward an alternative assessment technique, incorporating various indicators of social equity in order to assess the priority of power plant replacement that would lead to the greatest improvement in benefits, while placing the burden of system changes away from the most vulnerable. An example of the application of this approach is presented for prioritization of the retirement and replacement (with RE) of Australia s ageing fleet of coal-fired power plants. The assessment shows very different results from a standard cost-mitigation approach, with the retirement of the large brown coal power plants (including the recently retired Hazelwood power plant) and the replacement with wind power (where applicable) promoting the best overall outcomes on both cost and equity. Considering a selection of high priority indicators with many locally-specific data sets, the approach adds significant contextual relevance to prioritization, and is considered to offer useful findings for policy-makers..
2. Resource security strategies and their environmental and economic implications: A case study of copper production in Japan
© 2019 by the authors. Japan is a nation which is highly dependent on the import of raw materials to supply its manufacturing industry, notable among them copper. When extracting copper from ore, a large amount of energy is required, typically leading to high levels of CO2 emissions due to the fossil fuel-dominated energy mix. Moreover, maintaining security of raw material supply is difficult if imports are the only source utilized. This study examines the environmental and economic impacts of domestic mineral production from the recycling of end-of-life products and deep ocean mining as strategies to reduce CO2 emissions and enhance security of raw material supplies. The results indicate that under the given assumptions, recycling, which is typically considered to be less CO2 intensive, produces higher domestic emissions than current copper processing, although across the whole supply chain shows promise. As the total quantity of domestic resources from deep ocean ores are much smaller than the potential from recycling, it is possible that recycling could become a mainstream supply alternative, while deep ocean mining is more likely to be a niche supply source. Implications of a progressively aging society and flow-on impacts for the recycling sector are discussed..
3. Investigating ties between energy policy and social equity research: A citation network analysis
© 2019 by the authors. Just over twenty years ago, the Kyoto Protocol brought nations together to address the emergent issue of climate change. To support the development of energy policy, a number of academic fields were strengthened, particularly surrounding sustainable development and the economic, environmental, and social aspects of sustainability. This research focuses on the social aspects of energy policy, beginning with climate justice, through to the emergence of energy justice and the notion of a just transition. Through a bibliometric analysis of 5529 academic studies incorporating energy policy and social equity across relevant academic fields, strong ties among five distinct schools of thought were identified. Interestingly, energy transitions scholarship appears distinct from most social equity and energy justice related scholarship. There is a need to better integrate disparate schools of thought in order to achieve a just transitions framework able to address inequities in energy policy outcomes in the Paris Agreement era and beyond..
4. Engendering an inclusive low-carbon energy transition in Japan: Considering the perspectives and awareness of the energy poor
© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Engendering a low-carbon energy transition is necessary to limit climate change impacts and temperature rises. Ideally, this transition would be inclusive, incorporating all stakeholders, however, the issue of energy or fuel poverty is a major obstacle to this goal. This research investigates energy poverty in Japan using a subjective, multidimensional energy poverty measure, clarifying the linkages between energy poverty and an inclusive, just transition in terms of energy system and policy awareness, behavior and preferences. Through the analysis of an original survey, we uncover that there is a marked difference between low-income and energy poverty households’ environmental awareness, and their subsequent attitude toward the low-carbon energy transition. Currently, the energy poor have a negative attitude toward the low-carbon energy transition in Japan, causing a lack of self-reported engagement which will not engender an inclusive, just transition. Our findings suggest that if the Japanese low-carbon energy transition were to be inclusive, a further 5 percent of households could participate in the low-carbon energy transition through access to solar or renewable energy capital. Findings identify the need for policies targeted at the energy poor, specifically promoting access to solar capital and low-carbon technologies, in addition to existing policies targeted at low-income households..
5. Andrew John Chapman, Timothy Fraser, Melanie Dennis, Investigating ties between energy policy and social equity research
A citation network analysis
, Social Sciences, 10.3390/socsci8050135, 2019.05, Just over twenty years ago, the Kyoto Protocol brought nations together to address the emergent issue of climate change. To support the development of energy policy, a number of academic fields were strengthened, particularly surrounding sustainable development and the economic, environmental, and social aspects of sustainability. This research focuses on the social aspects of energy policy, beginning with climate justice, through to the emergence of energy justice and the notion of a just transition. Through a bibliometric analysis of 5529 academic studies incorporating energy policy and social equity across relevant academic fields, strong ties among five distinct schools of thought were identified. Interestingly, energy transitions scholarship appears distinct from most social equity and energy justice related scholarship. There is a need to better integrate disparate schools of thought in order to achieve a just transitions framework able to address inequities in energy policy outcomes in the Paris Agreement era and beyond..